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New verses Old Style of Cooking

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have been watching a show that maybe some of you are familar with called 'In Search of Perfection' by Heston Blumenthal. He is a culinary alchemist with 3 Michelin Stars.
I love the idea of finding the science behind the plate. He must have one of the most scientific kitchens to date yet he is not shy to try anything to get an idea across, like putting a fan under a barbecue to get a higher temperature to cook a pizza properly with the same temp all the way around, not just one level hotter than the top or bottom....that being said...
When I go home to see my mother, the first thing I do when I walk in the door is SMELL, I want to smell her cooking. What has she made ? Did she make any old recipes from her mother's cookbook ? Did she find anything new to cook ? If she were to make toast , it would taste like the best toast I ever had in the whole world because my mother made it . I have learned how to cook because of the inspiration of my mother and my grandmother. They did not even hesitate to whip up a souffle when duty called, they were masters of their own domain, they gave Julia a good run for her money. There was no high tech in the old days, all the recipes they made were passed down through the generations and some were developed because the wine may not have hit the pot. There was no science behind the plate. All mothers automatically got Michelin stars from their children and rightly so. Now I ask you, do you like modern cuisine or old fashioned ?
Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 12
I like both. When I visit my Grandmother I expect she will be making something in an old fashioned way. We're talking about a woman who used to grind her own bulgar wheat in her own stone mill. She has her own chickens and goats. She doesn't have any fancy equipment or deep fryers but when she gets her "frying pan" you will be treated to french fries, fried fish, or fried cheese pies that are not the least bit greasy. Nobody fries like my Grandma.

That said, I enjoy going out to restaurants where I know that the food may be modern and sophisticated. I'm impressed with knife skills, thermometers, pan skills, trussing, butchering, and presentation. But my mom doesn't even use a cutting board when she's cooking and those are knife skills even Hung from top chef doesn't have.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 12
I seem to have this discussion with cooks I work with on a constant basis... and my opinion has been pretty unwavering for a while now: both have their uses in cuisine and both are important... but it's silly to think that new techniques "kill" the craft and "art" behind cusine.

Just as photography didn't kill art, immersion circulators, xanthan gum, and other more modern tools will not kill cuisine. There is still appreciation and uses for the old styles of cooking (clarifying consommes with a raft, or roasting a pig in a pit of hot coals), but new methods open up the possibilities for new creations or simply a more efficient way to make the classics. Just as refrigeration, gas stoves, thermometers, and whisks helped make Escoffier's cuisine possible the tools conceived since his time will make new classics.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #4 of 12
I didnt have a mother growing up, but dad was chef. He was one of those scary chefs that made you think " i want to be a chef when i grow up, but not like him" He scraped the mould off anything festering in the fridge, concocted something, and made me n my brothers clean our plates. Apparently he was well thought of in culinary circles locally??

Anyhoo, I love to research traditional recipes and taper them to todays tastes. Ie, Victorian dishes full of butter, sugar and cream can be re-vamped to be more artery friendly.
I looove puddings and love making them. The UK has a huge tradition of fabulous puds.
Classic sauces will never die out. Neither will 1,000,000 other classic recipes but I do enjoy trying new ideas, especially with fish. Either at home, or eating out.

Ps. Re. dads talent. can you imagine feeding swede (ruterbager?) and black pepper rissotto to 5 under 10 years olds. Scary!!
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #5 of 12
I like both. I do like the comfort foods but I also enjoy modern cuisine as well both at home and when we are out.
OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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OK ... where am I going?.. and WHY am I in this handbasket??
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post #6 of 12
My Gramps is the chef in the family. Very, very old fashioned and stubborn in his ways ;). It's his way or no way. I cook for him and he enjoys the food I make, but if there is a different spice or a more modern twist to the dish, he questions, 'hmm...what is this?' in a curious way. I prefer to cook his recipes in his homemade cookbook because everything is delicious. It's also nice to experiment with different ways of cooking and different dishes that aren't necessarily your family's traditional cuisine.
post #7 of 12
Why does it have to be one or the other?

My only criteria is that it be good food prepared well. On one hand, this could mean an 18th century dish, cooked in a Dutch oven over an open fire. On the other hand, it could be something utilizing this morning's newest application of molecular gastronomy.

I believe most people are that way, with food preferences extending across the spectrum.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 12
With the way commercially grown chickens are produced, I found it impossible to prepare one the same way as I did going back to the 70's. Way less fat on today's birds and therefore no schmaltz. 8(

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #9 of 12
I can't really speak here. My grandmother has an immersion circulator in her home kitchen.
post #10 of 12
I like both.
I've also eaten at Blumethal's Fat Duck, too. I have to admit, that whilst I had to bow to his wonderful presentation and scientific approach - I won't be trying his snail porridge again any time soon!
post #11 of 12
The new cooking will soon become the old cooking.... I just like food done good. There's a lot of bruhaha about gastronomic cookery/chemistry, fiddling with food to make it surprising and new. I must admit, some of it is fascinating, and the processes slightly bewildering.

Nice for a new experience, to be able to say you've tried it. But are you going to do it at home? Nope. (Or at least highly unlikely).
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
You are right, the new cooking will become the old.....

I seem to have a fascination about the word "Why" . I love finding out why things work a certain way. Why foods cook the way they do. Can we attain perfection in a dish ? Is there such thing as "a perfect dish" ? Or is a dish only great in the eyes of the one who created it ? Or by the one who judges it ?

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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