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Spanish Paella

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hello fellows!
I don't know about you but I love the typical Spanish Paella. I always did the recipe my mom showed me but I've been searching for new recipes and ways of doing it and I've found a lot of new paella recipes on this spanish site: Recetas paella - Gallina Blanca
There's 11 types of Spanish paella on the site but my favourite is the "Paella Marinera" (Receta de Paella marinera - Gallina Blanca).
The only problem is that you gotta understand a little spanish. But here goes the recipe for anyone who wants to do it:

Ingredientes


Paso 1º

Hervir los mejillones limpios, hasta que se abran. Colar y reservar el caldo.

Paso 2º

Rehogar la sepia en un poco de aceite. Añadir los pimientos a tiras, los guisantes y las gambas. Remover y dejar cocer unos 7-8 min. Añadir los ajos machacados, el Tomate Frito en Trozos y el arroz. Sofreír unos minutos.

Paso 3º

Agregar el Caldo de Pescado, el caldo reservado de los mejillones (colado), el colorante y dejar cocer a fuego vivo 3 min. Bajar el fuego y cocer unos 17 min. más. Dejar reposar fuera del fuego durante 5 min. Servir adornada con los mejillones.


If you have your own recipes or tips on how to do the paella please tell me, I'm planning a typical Spanish Party and I'm willing to do alot of spanish recipes. If you have any other spanish recipes like Gazpacho please tell me too.

Thanks :)
post #2 of 19
It's nice to see someone post a paella recipe which is a little more typically Spanish than the ubiquitous "paella Valenciana," in that most Spanish Paellas don't combine so many classes of proteins. So, brava!

On the other hand, it would be a kindness for those readers who don't speak Spanish if you'd translate the recipe for them. I doubt many will go to the trouble of breaking it down word by word with a dictionary.

Finally, the recipe is, to some extent, breand specific. Gallinas Blancas is a brand name, not a flock of white chickens. One of the items on the ingredient list in particular, the jar of tomatoes with fried onions is going to be a little difficult to find. You might want to recommend a substitute ingredient or at least mention that the average US cook is going to have to make her/his own. You might also mention that although fish stock isn't something you find in most US supers, fish stock base is available on the net and nearly all commercial suppliers, and there are perfectly adequate substitutes like (diluted) clam juice. Also, this recipe presumes a paellera -- something you might also want to mention.

Ole!
BDL
post #3 of 19
"Seafood paella recipe - Gallina Blanca

Recipe Seafood paellaMediaMediterranean20-40 minutesPaellaRiceStarter4
Ingredients
300 gr. rice
1pepper red
3 tablespoonsFrito Tomato Pieces Mis Sofritos
1green pepper
4teeth driving
1sepia
2 kg. Mussel
oil
150 gr. pea
150 gr. Shrimp
dye
600 ccthe Gallina Blanca Fish Broth

Preparing seafood paella recipe

Paso 1
Boil clean mussels until they open. Strain and reserve the hot.
Paso 2
Fry the sepia in some oil. Add the peppers into strips, peas and prawns. Remove and let cook 7-8 min. Add crushed garlic, the Tomate Frito Pieces and rice. Fry few minutes.
Paso 3
Add the fish stock, reserved broth from the mussels (foundry), the coloring and cook over high heat 3 min. Reduce heat and cook about 17 min. more. Let stand off the heat for 5 minutes. Serve decorated with mussels.
--------------------------------

Feeds RSS All recipes Recipes | Recipes ContactLEGAL NOTICE© Gallina Blanca Star 2009 "

***This was a Google translator version. It's kind of amusing where it says "4teeth driving" I take it that's 4 cloves of garlic? Or is it a soccer parent in their SUV? :D

Sepia is a cuttlefish
Paso is Step
Foundry = ? maybe stock?
Dye = Saffron/tumeric maybe?

Need to know more than just a little Spanish...but if you can follow, it does sound like a good dish, with not too much thrown in, as can be the case with some recipes for Paella.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #4 of 19
In this case, "foundry" is mistranslated from "colado," which should properly be translated as "strained."

"Colorante," the word translated as "dye," is just coloring. You could (and ideally would) use bloomed saffron or, less ideally, turmeric. But I get the sense the recipe is suggesting a budget alternative -- regular food coloring.

The "Frito Tomato Pieces Mis Sofritos" is pureed tomato with sauteed onions -- sold as a finished product in Spain, in much the way tomato sauce with "Italian seasoning" may be had here.

"Dientes de ajo" are indeed garlic cloves.

I wasn't actually asking for a translation, as I read and speak Spanish fluently. Rather, I thought it would have been a good idea had the OP posted the translation instead of posting in Spanish.

BDL
post #5 of 19
Was interested myself to see what the translation was - my Spanish is verrrry basic, so having done the translation for myself, just thought I'd share it.

Dientes de Ajo - I can see how they are called teeth - the cloves of garlic do look like fangs or canine teeth. Languages are fascinating.

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #6 of 19

Paella Por Ella

O por el. I used to have a friend who devised what I think is a really good Paella after a trip he made to Spain working on a movie as a Production Designer. Since he had never written down the recipe, and winged it, as they say, I followed him around his beautiful kitchen with a note pad one afternoon. Now, Ted, my friend, used only browned chicked and shellfish, but he had two secret ingredients: one drained can of smoked oysters, and one can of Lobster Bisque. These give the Paella a truly wonderful flavor. Oh, and a little dry white wine; Sauvignon Blanc works quite well. You might want to try this, since you are doing so much experimenting with this dish. I would guess there are about as many versions as there are Spaniards. Bon apetit!
post #7 of 19
Bon Appetit Deirdre,


I really enjoyed this thread , does not take much to learn something new .

Thanks for sharing the definitions. (oh ye faithful translators)

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 19
I would have been more in keeping with the thread had I closed with Buen provecho, instead of the French, petals - but, glad you found the added ingredients interesting.

Because you're a chocolate-lover, I have to tell you I always wanted to start my own film production company just so I could call it Better Than Chocolate Productions.

Have to ask you, do you prefer Callebaut, Valrhona or Guittard, or even something else? I just bought all three to make my "Tortoises" (Turtles being a trademark), which are a Christmas tradition for my family, but always bought the chocolate coins at our local cake decorating shop where I used to live, not knowing what brand they used. I make both light and dark chocolate versions.
post #9 of 19
About the buen provecho thing, the post was crankier than informative -- which is why it got deleted. Lo siento mis amigas.

On the thread-bending chocolate thing:

Don't fall in love with a brand, buy whichever good brand is freshest. Fresh Ghirardelli from Trader Joes beats anything, no matter how much better it was when fresh, that's been sitting around.

It's easy to taste staleness, but "not quite fresh" is a little more subtle. The aftertaste is revealing. Fresh chocolate lingers for a little while, then cuts out completely. Chocolate which is not quite fresh persists on your palate. Once you've sorted this out in your mind, you'll always choose fresh.

Aprovecharle!
BDL
post #10 of 19
aprovecharle is an enclitic form of Spanish verb aprovechar

a·pro·ve·char Verb
  1. make good use of, make use of, utilize, avail, capitalize on, profit by, utilise; Synonyms: echar mano de, emplear, hacer buen uso de, hacer uso de, ocupar, servirse de, usar bien; Emplear útilmente alguna cosa, hacerla provechosa o sacarle el máximo rendimiento.Zoe aprovecha el tiempo, Zoe makes good use of the time
I learned a new word today :D
Talking about chocolate, I wish there was a thread dedicated to this glorious topic.
That being said,
I must say that Godiva and Callebaut and Chauo (which won the Gold) are right up there in my books. Yes, Valrhona is very good too.

But Ghirardelli is terrific also for baking. So you have a vast array of chocolates to work with. Do not get sold on any one name brand but find the type of chocolate that suits your needs.

I went to a bridal shower last night and made Ghirardelli chocolate ginger brownies. Why Ghirardelli ? It is dark, its easy to melt, and it tastes great. Now when you factor in the cost of the other types of chocolate for baking then there is the price tag. What is your budget ? Your clients taste ? and so on.

This is just an opinion .....hopefully , like I said , someone will open a thread and really get into the heart of this powerful ingredient.
Petals
Buenas Tardes

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #11 of 19
Be sure I will make good use of your advice. Personally, just don't care for Ghiardelli.

I'm confused, though, about the buen provecho thing. Was I offensive in saying that I should have closed that note in Spanish instead of French??? It didn't really hit me until petals replied in French, and I slapped my forhead, thinking what an idiot I had been. Now it's been deleted? No problema, pero lo siento mucho.
post #12 of 19
Good reason not to use it.

No. But I really put my foot into it, didn't I?

I deleted my own post, which you apparently (and luckily) seem to have mssed. In retrospect it seemed overly picky. There was no reason for me to call attention to the language incongruity; which, it goes without saying, is just fine.

Para todas las faltas de anterior, disculpame.

A su servicio,
BDL
post #13 of 19
I love good chocolate! (hmmm...which is not unlike my feelings toward all other things edible:crazy:)

There's a lot of nice chocolate out there that I've tried...but my current favorite is Scharffen Berger.


Yum!
dan
post #14 of 19
Ah, esta claro ahora, BDL. Ademas, no problema.
post #15 of 19

The keys to great paella

The sofritto

The broth

The rice

And of course the saffron has to be good and there has to be enough of it.

the rest is elementry

post #16 of 19

Perhaps a hand hammered black steel paella pan to add to the mix!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by boar_d_laze View Post

"paella Valenciana,"

Ole!
BDL

 

If you order paella in Valencia, you will get it with rabbit and snails (and usually chicken, beans and peppers), and it will be cooked over orange wood.  And their seafood rice dish is made with squid ink.

post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deirdre View Post
no problema.

No hay problema

post #19 of 19

Si, lo siento.  Necesito mas practica.  Or something like that

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