or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Almost Fondue Time!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Almost Fondue Time!

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
The air is getting that nip at night indicating it's time to break out the fondue set here in Switzerland. Yay!
Is there anything that sets a more convivial atmosphere? Maybe, but I don't know what that would be.

Here is the recipe used, in the canton Vaud where I live, by just about everyone I know. Gruyère cheese is used of course and if it isn't AOC (Appellation d'Origine Contrôlée) I swear Swiss people will know just by the smell!

Fondue Vaudoise
For four people

1 clove of garlic, cut in two
28.2 oz of grated or thin slices of Gruyère AOC cheeses (using different degrees of maturity)
4 tsp of cornflour
3.5 dl (11 - 11.5 oz I think) white wine (I use wine from the Domaine du Daley named Epesses)
1 tsp freshely squeezed lemon juice
1 small glass of Kirsch (small is defined by the person making it!)
freshly ground pepper
freshly grated nutmeg

Rub the fondue dish with the clove of garlic. If you want, you may leave the clove of garlic in the fondue dish.
Mix all the Gruyère together with the cornflour in the foundue dish, add the white wine and lemon juice. Bring to a boil while stirring continuously, until the cheese has melted.
Add the kirsch, season with the pepper and nutmeg and serve immediately.

I've learned that the secret of making a very creamy fondue is to leave the fondue mix to rest from 1 to 2 hours in chilled wine before the final preperation.

Local tradition here calls for a coup du milieu in the middle of the meal. Simply a drink break. Here beverages like kirsch, eau de vie (brandy), pear juice made from William pears - which I've never understood why that kind of pear only, calva (apple brandy) white wine, or grappa (plum juice)! I've seen people pour a bit of kirsch into a small glass then dip their bread in it prior to putting it into the fondue. Tried it, don't like it.

Don't forget, if the bread breaks off in the fondue, the offending person has to buy a round of drinks, if it's a man. A woman has to kiss the man sitting next to her left. Some use the rule that the offender has to jump in the snow wearing only their underware!
For me the best part is what's at the bottom of the pot...la religieuse (the nun. Nope, don't know why). It's the thin crust of cheese left in the bottom of the dish. Yum!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
post #2 of 8
Let me know when you're making it - I'll be there :)

Is the wine sweet or dry? Was almost too embarassed to ask - I just don't know!

What's your preferred bread to have to dip? I guess also grissini could be used?

It's still cold here at night, and I've got an unchristened fondue set that's begging to be used.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #3 of 8
Thread Starter 
"DC Sunshine Let me know when you're making it - I'll be there :)"

I'll probably make my first batch toward the end of the month, beginning of next...that gives you time to get plane reservations!

"Is the wine sweet or dry? Was almost too embarassed to ask - I just don't know!"

No need to be embarassed...I have no palate for wines. All I can do is tell you how they describe it. "Fine, very mineral white wine, with a touch of lemon and apple, discrete aromas, long and powerful finish. Excellent aperitif wine, also a perfect accompaniment to fish, cheese, raw meats and sushi." Domaine du Daley has three varities of Epesses. I use Chasselas Tradition Pôt Vaudois. So, because one of the "rules" of preparing a traditional cheese fondue is you should use a high-quality, dry white wine. Gotta love Swiss people and their tradtions! Apparently it's one of the major elements contributing to the success of traditional fondue. The wine's natural acidity makes the cheese smooth and creamy and keeps it from becoming runny. Young wine is best; very old wine generally isn't acidic enough. Or so I've been told. :)

"What's your preferred bread to have to dip? I guess also grissini could be used?"

Good bread choices for fondue are virtually limitless. Any type can be used, from fluffy, white bread to heavy, whole-grain bread. A fun way for me to present cheese fondue is with a variety of fresh, crusty white bread and multi-grain bread with nuts and spices. I suppose you could use grissini. I've never tried it but now I have to.

"It's still cold here at night, and I've got an unchristened fondue set that's begging to be used."

How can you sit there and listen to that poor fondue set begging night after night?! Break that puppy in!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
post #4 of 8
These posts bring back fond memories, I worked with a Swiss chef for 15 years. He was from Lausanne, did his apprenticeship at the Beau Rivage in the 60's. Besides making the Fondue like you mention, we would warm up some Raclette and serve it with buendnerfleisch, warm boiled potatoes with mustard and cornichons. Michel always had a few bottles of L'Arbalete to enjoy. His father is actually buried in the Dezaly over looking lake Geneva.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #5 of 8
Thank you, American_Suisse! This may inspire a weekend trip to New Glarus here in Southern Wisconsin. It's a community of Swiss immigrants which is over 100 years old. I haven't been there for ages; it's time to go again.

The last time I had authentic fondue was in Lucerne over 20 years ago. So delicious.... Too bad it was in the summer! The restaurant was stifling. But the nutty, rich taste of the fondue lingers.

Quick question: is "cornflour" what we in the US call "corn starch"? It's for thickening a sauce.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #6 of 8
Suisse - I'll listen more closely to that poor fondue set from now :) Now I've got you thinking about grissini...I think it would work. Can't hurt to try!

Ok so a young, dry white wine...check...

Cape Chef - those potatoes and cornichons sound like a great idea. Yummers.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #7 of 8
Thread Starter 
Sorry, it is corn starch. I'm starting to mix my languages!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME stuff, why didn't he just buy dinner?
Reply
post #8 of 8
Ça ne fait rien! :D
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Almost Fondue Time!