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I want to scramble an egg - Page 2

post #31 of 42
Not to hijack the thread but I wanted to add: This is the step I use to improve a waffle batter recipe that doesn't already call for this.
So light and fluffy.
Yum-tastic (it's an industry term) :D
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post #32 of 42
I've tried everything from orange juice to milk along with various spices and add-ins, but my favorite way is quick and easy.

I heat up my pan to a moderately high heat with a small knob of butter melted inside. I whisk my eggs with a pinch of salt until they're just broken down and well-blended. I then pour the eggs into the hot pan, which should be hot enough so that it gives off a good sizzle when the eggs are poured in, and stir constantly. Depending on the amount of eggs, they should be done in no more than about 30 seconds. I always pull them out when they're just slightly underdone, as they finish on the warm plate by the time I get to the table.

I'll have to try out some of the ways here that I haven't yet done!
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post #33 of 42
>It's about time we had an egg discussion.

So what about the way we all prefer our eggs? I like mine boiled med/soft with toast. Butter, s&p on the side to mix in.

I like baked egg custard, egg mayonnaise, heavy on the pepper, Toast topped with a fried egg, then beans, then cheddar cheese, mushroom and rocket omlette. Mostly I like how my mum made me a soft boiled egg, mushed up in a cup with butter when i was a little girl
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #34 of 42
>One thing I've learned is that I do not ABSOLUTELY HAVE to have the heat on FULL all the time when cooking. ;)<

French Fries, the fact is, for home cooking, it's very rare that you should be cooking with the burners full-on.

But that's the grist for a different discussion.
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #35 of 42
Favorite is over easy fried in the bacon fat with toast. You didn't ask for healthy :lol:
post #36 of 42
Same here:D
post #37 of 42
Thread Starter 
Thanks for posting Gordon Ramsay's youtube method. I tried it out today and I've honestly never had a fluffier egg scramble!!!

Question - I left out the creme fraiche. It's too expensive and I'm not a huge fan anyway. What would be the right thing to sub it with?

Comment - After I scrambled the eggs in this fashion they seemed.... less. They didn't seem to occupy as much of the plate is what I mean. What could possibly cause this?

My favorite way to eat eggs is over easy, with french fries or a hashbrown casserole, sausage, and country bread for dipping.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #38 of 42
'Make your own fraiche drop of vinegar in some heavy cream /warm place overnight.
You could sub a touch of sour cream to eggs, /another use we often add to scrambled in chaffing dishes at buffets where to much exposure to heat makes eggs turn green. The sour cream accidity stops this from happening.:chef:
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post #39 of 42
Aha! So that's where green eggs and ham origiated....on the buffet :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #40 of 42
The technique I use to make scrambled eggs is to first start off with the intention of making an omelet.

Somehow ruin it and then be too embarrassed to serve it that way. . . then it's just a matter of doing the scrambling.:talk:
post #41 of 42
For someone in an area such as yours, the best replacement for creme fraiche is crema fresa -- which you can purchase fairly inexpensively from most hispanic markets. Crema fresa can be a bit salty, taste before you use and adjust accordingly. As a matter of fact, I prefer crema fresa for its conveniences and economy to creme fraiche for all purposes.

Ed's method, called "clabbering," gives you a more sour cream. The texture of clabbered cream will be much like a commercial creme fraiche if you catch it at the right time after clabbering. You can always stir overly thick, clabbered or commercial sour cream into something silkier, lighter, and more like creme fraiche. Attack it with a fork, con brio.

My wife never liked scrambled eggs but did like omelets. The method I use which suits her is as follows:

Whisk (or beat with a fork) two eggs until well mixed, but do not beat them fluffy. You may add pepper -- preferably white -- if you like, you may also add salt.

Preheat a 10" omelette pan over medium heat. Tip: Well cured, carbon steel, with sloped and ideally rounded sides is far and away the best. When the pan is evenly heated, oil it lightly with corn oil, or other light cooking oil.

When the oil is hot, remove the pan from the flame to prevent scorching, burning or browning, and immediately add two tsp of butter (one in your case). The butter will begin to melt and foam. Return the pan to the fire.

Beat the eggs again to make sure they haven't separated.

As soon as the foam from the butter subsides, pour the eggs into the pan. Stir the mixture in center of the pan with your fork. Wait about 20 seconds and shake the pan. You should see a layer at the bottom of the pan, reaching all the way to the edge, shake loose. If you don't, wait another 20 seconds and try again.

Tilt the pan away from you slightly, then use your fork to push the cooked eggs to the far edge. Holding the eggs there, tilt the pan towards you, so the uncooked egg mixture flows into the hot area of the pan.

When the fresh layer of cooked eggs reaches the edge, fold the eggs in half, as though you were making an omelette, and keep folding and turning. It's better to use the pan to toss-flip, but you may use a spatula if you don't know how. Remove the pan from the flame just before the eggs are cooked as you like -- and allow them to coast to done.

You can judge doneness quite accurately by appearance. For people who like their eggs medium, that means moving the pan when the eggs are still moist and shiny -- and serving them just as they just start to lose their sheen.

BDL
post #42 of 42
Try using a double boiler with the water below at a simmer...that's my favorite way.
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