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Beurre Blanc

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Do you add cream to your Beurre Blanc ? Do you use white wine or Vermouth ?
Serving up 400 plates on saturday and I am looking for a wonderful Beurre Blanc.

Petals

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 15
How is the plating? I'd add cream anyway. I've never made BB with Vermouth.
post #3 of 15
Cream isn't part of a classic beurre blanc, but it does help keep it from breaking. So if I were you, I'd add it.

Wouldn't use vermouth, though -- adds too much of a floral flavor, especially when reduced -- just a dry white.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 15
So I have a question here about the cream. How much cream to add and how much to reduce? I've always added just a couple Tablespoons of cream and reduced it until sauce consistency. Then add a few pounds of butter.
post #5 of 15
I never add cream no matter how much you need to make.....if you make it correctly and control the holding temp you should be fine.....burre blanc does not have cream....maybe i'm just old school
post #6 of 15
I know what you're saying, but for catering it's hard to do it without cream.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you for helping out. I realize that Beurre Blanc (authentic) does not have cream but last night someone told me to use it. I have been mulling this idea around this morning and thought I would get your thoughts.

It will be served with stuffed salmon (crab meat) along with , Haricots Lyonnaise and riz sauvage (wild rice) with a tomato au gratin.....I would like to make a decision on this by thursday.
Do you recommend another sauce ?

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 15
For banquet or catering service or volume yes add cream for stabiliztion. or A la Cart no
Pour it in a stainless steel coffee pot to put on individual plates easier then a ladle:chef:
Sauce Nantua, or Light Newburg sauce /alternates
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Interesting, I think you are right, Kuan said it too, for that many people I should go with the cream.


Not that I am going to use vermouth ( I will use white wine ) but have you or anyone else ever tried it ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 15
I have used vermouth in the past, and I agree that the flavor is pretty strong. Thing is, pair it with something that can stand up to the vermouth. An example is grapefruit.

As for cream, I use it for volume, never for a la carte.

Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

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Jason Sandeman

http://jasonsandeman.com

Developing Systems So You Can Cook

Reply
post #11 of 15
Technically speaking beurre blanc doesn't have cream, but beurre nantais does. One of the nice things about this is beurre nantais is simply beurre blanc with cream. Beurre nantais is a little less risky than beurre blanc, and if you want to serve it "a la carte" as it were you can go ahead and do so. Call it beurre nantais and you'll impress the heck out of your clients. But cream or no, it's perfectly legitimate to call it beurre blanc. Everyone does.

Speaking of variations, beurre blanc or nantais is very good made with lemon juice instead of vinegar, with capers and parsley added at the finish.

The proper way to introduce the cream is to do so after reducing the vinegar and shallots. Then reduce the cream for about two or three minutes. Lower the heat as low as it goes and mount the the first 75% of the butter in several stages. Finally, turn off the fire and use residual heat to mount the last 25% of the butter in two stages. If you hold off adding each new stage of butter until the previous addition is about 2/3 to 3/4 melted, you'll further increase your chances for success in creating a long lasting, silky emulsion, as well as giving your sauce more volume and structure.

Hope this helps,

BDL
post #12 of 15
The **** with it do a Bearnaise sauce............Bill
post #13 of 15
Nantais is a lot of cream though, it's like 1/2 cream 1/2 butter.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thank you so much for the input.

Yes, Beurre Nantais is seen on the menus here in Montreal , in particular, le Vieux Port de Montreal.

Because of the number of clients, I believe I will use the cream. You are so right about the emulsion, there can be no room for error on this one. I want them to talk about the 'sauce'.

Thanks for the reminder of using the capers and parsley, I love details.

Every man's life ends the same way. It is only the details of how he lived and how he died that distinguish one man from another.
Ernest Hemingway

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #15 of 15
I love beurre blanc, always do it with salmon. Now I am a slacker and don't do the whisking, so it is just a lemon butter sauce. Did this for a family reunion in the mountains of Montana and everybody LOVED it. At home even my fussy 2 year old really enjoys salmon with this sauce.
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