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Yeast For Bread - Dry Or Fresh?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi All

I have a bread maker and I know you are supposed to use dry yeast - which I have been since I bought it. However, unfortunately I can no longer find a source for it here.

But, I discovered recently that my local supermarket has started stocking fresh yeast. I am totally unfamiliar with it and hoped that an expert on here might be able to answer a few questions for me. My apologies for any 'silly' questions in advance! :)

1. Can fresh yeast be used for making bread when the recipe for the bread maker states dry yeast?

Assuming the answer to the first question is yes...

2. If so, what is the relationship (quantity-wise) between dry and fresh yeast?

If a loaf recipe uses 1 teaspoon of dry yeast, how much do you use of the fresh yeast? It comes in a 25g pack and has the consistency of very soft nougat.

3. I assume that fresh yeast is a living organism and wondered if it could be cultivated or 'grown'. If so, is it easy to do, or is specialist equipment required.

Thanks for your time...

TenBaz
post #2 of 20
Just get yourself a pound sack of SAF Red Instant yeast since, unlike fresh yeast cakes that real bakers use, has a very long shelf life even when frozen. After being open for almost 2 years, I'm still using the same sack of Red SAF and it seems to work as well as when first opened.

A little more research is needed on your part. You'd do quite well if you got a copy of Jeffrey Hamelman's book entitled Bread. It offers clear explainations between the different yeasts.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #3 of 20
Don't know where you live, but I find it strange that any supermarket stocks fresh yeast, but not some form of dry.

The problem with using fresh yeast in your bread machine is twofold.

Bread machines (doesn't matter which make and model) are designed to use instant yeast. Reason for that is that instant (aka, SAF, bread-machine, and a few other aliases) can be used without first blooming it. You just mix it in with the other dry ingredients.

Instant yeast, because of the percentage of live yeast cells in contains, also works much faster. Instant yeast has 25% more live cells than active dry yeast, and 300% more than fresh yeast. So you can see the kinds of adjustments you'd have to make using fresh in your bread machine.

Were it me I'd double check availability of the others. Typically they come in envelopes (three such attached to each other) and in 4-oz jars. Markings will be "active dry" for the standard yeast; "instant" on the envelopes or "bread machine" on the jars.

If you still can't find it, I would go on-line and order it in bulk. A pound of SAF isn't all that expensive, and, by storing the main reserve of it in the freezer, it can last you two days longer than forever.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 20
No idea where "Here" is but just about every Walmart in North America carries jars of bread machine yeast and well as the packets of rapid rise yeast. You may want to consider an on line soure.
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
"Don't know where you live", "No idea where "Here" is"...

'Here' is a small volcanic island just off the NW coast of Africa! :)

Anyway, I managed to find a half-kilo bag of dry yeast a few years back. I know it lasts because I have just enough left in the bag for half a dozen more loaves of bread and believe it or not, the expiry date on the bag is 2006!

But the bread still rises perfectly, tastes right and hasn't killed me yet so I'm not worrying about it...

As I said, I've searched almost all the shops and bakeries here without success and although I can more than likely get relatives to bring me some out with them when they come to visit me, I just wondered if fresh yeast was a viable option in the meantime - if I run out before anyone comes out.

If it worked, I had thoughts of being able to 'grow' it and never have to buy it again.

Thanks to you all for the info.

TenBaz
post #6 of 20
In America your yeast might be known as SAF RED INSTANT YEAST that's sold in one pound (therefore approx 1/2 kg) bags. You should be able to get this stuff by ordering online and I've never seen in sold in all of the shops/brick and mortar stores that I've visited.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #7 of 20
Ten Baz, there are many ingredients that bear expiration dates which are meaningless. The makers have to use a date, so arbitrarily pick one. Many whole spices, for instance, are treated like that.

Anyway, you can order the yeast you need on line from many sources. Check out, for instance, the King Arthur Flour site, or Wisenburger Mills. Or just do a search under baking yeast.

As Kokopuffs notes, in bulk (that is, one-pound), you'll most likely find it listed as SAF. But some sites merely call it instant yeast or rapid-rise yeast. That's the kind you want.

A half-kilo would equal 1 lb 10 oz, so a pound bag should last you awhile.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 20
>If it worked, I had thoughts of being able to 'grow' it and never have to buy it again.<

What you can grow is a sour dough starter, which is, at base, nothing more than a source of leavening. There are all sorts of instructions available on-line for getting a sour-dough started.

Can you use a starter in your bread machine? Someone else will have to answer that cuz I don't have a clue.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 20

Yeast Math

Just "Google" Yeast Math and lots will come up. Here is just one example:

Compressed Yeast / Active Dry Yeast Conversion!? - Yahoo! Answers

Hope this helps you.
post #10 of 20
Thread Starter 
I have relatives bringing me a bag of SAF when they come to visit me next month.

Thanks for all your help and suggestions!

TB
post #11 of 20
I've seen experienced bakers advise storing the big bulk pack of yeast in the freezer, tightly sealed to keep moisture out, and taking out a small jar's worth when needed.

I'm lucky, able to buy Red Star instant yeast from a local health-food store, "Good Foods Grocery." They break up 1-pound (about a half kilo) bags into little plastic tubs for sale at US$5 per pound, the same they'd charge for whole bags. I get about a quarter pound for a buck and change and that's enough for two to four months of baking.

However you do it, bulk yeast is a heck of a lot cheaper than getting it in single-batch packets! My most recent quarter-pound cost about as much as two packets cost in a supermarket.

May you bake many delicious things with the Yeast Yet To Come.
post #12 of 20
I'll trade yeast for fresh vanilla beans and tamarind any day! ;)
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #13 of 20
If you have a recipe that suggest instant yeast, you have to use this proportion of fresh yeast. 3:1
1=fresh yeast
3=instant yeast.
So use 1/3 of the total instant yeast.
post #14 of 20
I'm lucky, able to buy Red Star instant yeast from a local health-food store, "Good Foods Grocery."

Can I ask where you're located, Meffy? We have a shop with a similar name, and their prices also are out of line. Five bucks is a bit high for SAF.

I currently pay $3.15 a pound in the factory package.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #15 of 20
It's no accident that "health-food store" rhymes with "steal your money." We get our yeast from Smart and Final and also pay around $3.

But considering how long a pound lasts and that you'd pay more than $20/pound at the super for three jars of exactly the same thing labelled "bread machine yeast," $5 doesn't sound too bad.

BDL
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post #16 of 20
I pay approx $6 for a pound of SAF Red Instant Yeast. Two years later and approx 100 loaves of bread weighing 1-2.6 lbs each, 1/4 pound of yeast still remains and seems to have retained its original strength and it's kept in the freezer between uses.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #17 of 20
Speak with your local store owner. Most would welcome the input of what they should carry on their shelves. After all it sure cant hurt to ask him to carry what you use all the time.

:thumb:
post #18 of 20
[edit: This is addressed primarily to KYHeirloomer and boar_d_laze, who asked.]

I'm in Richmond, Virginia. Considering the amount of yeast I use, $1.20 for a few months' worth versus 80 cents isn't too bad a deal. Especially compared to supermarket prices, which are many many times as high.

If I could get it cheaper I would but this is convenient; nearby, saves gasoline. Plus they have bulk spices and unusual grain goods I can't get elsewhere, again far cheaper than grocery store prices for the stuff I use. Some items, such as honey, cost about as much there as anywhere, but theirs tastes better so it gets the edge. Super-fancy things like spirulina flour or jasmine rice cost a lot, as do the bulk prepared foods. So I just get the ingredient-type items there and make my own. [Not my own spirulina or jasmine rice. My own other stuff. Those two items don't particularly interest me.]

As for the prepared, packaged "healthy" foods... well, I'll let someone buy those who can afford them. =^_^=
post #19 of 20

jerkseasoning

yes in a breadmaker you can use either, we only have to ask at the fresh bakery department in our large food stores and they are happy to oblige, there is no difference in finished loaf between dried and fresh, a rounded teaspoon with same of sugar disolved in a little warm water but you probably already know that, by the way. I have lost the paddle for my breadmaker:cry:
post #20 of 20
I tivo JC's baking with Julia show.
last week, I viewed a couple of them
one was on baking sourdough bread from a pro.
funny how he said to mix a bit of flour water and cumin
and milk for a starter. I saved it and better watch it again to
remember why the cumin.
...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
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...All anyone ever does is complain....stop griping and start being thankful...be grateful...be appreciative...
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