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Evening y'all

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Its been about a year, and I cannot remember my username to save my life. Anyways, I got my first gig serving 100 people for a baptism. The family is Spainard and Mexican. Any ideas for a menu?
I am pretty sure I am going to do buffet style.
post #2 of 7
What is the allotted budget Per Person?????:bounce:
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #3 of 7
Also, from where in Spain and Mexico are the clients?
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
10 - 15 dollars a plate....and not sure where in Spain or Mexico
post #5 of 7
Unless you (a) have experience and competence with Spanish and Mexican cuisines; or, (b) the clients insist, stick to what you know.

Spanish and Mexican cuisines are, by and large, very different. The way you lump them together in your original post could be a clue that you're not proficient in either -- or it just may be that you wrote in a quick sort of shorthand.

Cooking for 100 is not an easy task -- triply hard when you're doing it for the first time. The organizational, logistic, and management hurdles are very high. Don't let preparing unfamiliar food make it harder. Now is not the time to learn how to make mole colaradito or mole negro.

On the other hand, if Oaxacan is your thing, you couldn't do much better. And, speaking of moles, many other Mexican dishes lend themselves to large event catering. For instance, all of the various stews, tamales, rice, beans, flans, and so on. Spanish food, by and large, is more ad hoc and less caterer friendly -- at least without a large kitchen and staff. Not that it can't be done, but you have to make good choices.

If you do have a reliable recipe (and enough equipment) for an arroze, like arroz con pollo, it's not a bad idea. For one thing, the new and old world versions aren't all that different. For another they can be made in large quantities and/or batches; benefit from holding; may be held and reheated; may be reheated easily; may be held at serving temperature for a long time; and a bunch of other good things. But again -- if it's something you haven't done before, 100 covers is not a good first time.

BDL
________________
Ex owner operator of Predmoninantly French: Intimate Catering; ex cook at a couple of good joints
post #6 of 7
What BDL said. Also, if you commit to an traditional menu for the Spaniards, and they happen to be from Southern Spain, you will find yourself up to your neck in some relatively pricey fish.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #7 of 7
My wife is Spanish as are many of my staff; likewise I was the first Head Chef for Groupo Anderson (Senor Frogs, Carlos and Charlies, Si Senor, El Couche etc) that was not Mexican. Your best best is lots of fresh fish/shellfish, rice, salads, homemade pic de gio, guac etc. Spanish food is not spicy so go easy with the chillis. Taco salads, burittos, chimichangas etc are Texmex, not Mexican; so don't make that mistake. Authentic Mexican food is very fresh with chillis normally served seperately on plates so you add as much, or as little as you like; lots of fish is never bad.
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
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UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
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