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Which type of saucepan should I use for my ceramic cook top?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hey,
There are many type of saucepans we using, but I want saucepan for my ceramic cook top, so which type of saucepan is best for me?
post #2 of 7
Unless you're talking about an induction cooktop, in my experience radiant electric ceramic cooktops have really uneven heat with wide swings in temperature as the element cycles. So you want something that conducts heat like crazy, but retains it, too.

Find the thickest aluminum, copper, or clad pans that you can. Avoid cast iron because even though it retains heat well it doesn't distribute it as well. (Also, cast iron can scratch the cooktop if you're not exceedingly careful.)
post #3 of 7
There's a difference between ceramic flat top and halogen flat top as well. If it glows quite bright right away, you have halogen.

Halogen responds better and uses more radiant heat than regular ceramic top, so perfect contact isn't as important.
post #4 of 7
Having had this conversation with a million customers when I was a appliance repair tech, I can tell you that the best type of exterior material for your pans on a ceramic stove (induction, radiant, halogen etc) is stainless steel or bare cast iron. These materials will not scratch the glass, in fact most often the stove will come with a steel scrapper to clean the glass.
Any glass or porcelain can scratch the glass. Any soft metal like aluminum or copper will leave marks on the glass, that will come off if cleaned right away with Wiemans cook top cleaner. If they are left on there for a while they will be pretty much permanent. Also most coated aluminum is coated with a porcelain style enamel, see above.

As far as what the interior of the pot or pan is made of, that is up to your personal preference. Something like a clad design or an stainless encapsulated aluminum disc is a excellent compromise for the heat conduction of aluminum without marking the stove top.

If you dont care about marking the stove top however, exposed aluminum or copper are still your best conductors. The little bit of gold or silver streaks left on the glass won't really hurt the way the stove works.

The single MOST IMPORTANT aspect of how your pot or pan works on a ceramic stove top (not induction, that works with electromagnetism) is CONTACT . The pan must be as flat as possible. If your pan only contacts the glass in one or two small spot, those spots will be hot. This is why a lot of people complain that their ceramic glass top stove takes too long to boil water. The biggest reason for this is obvious, the heat isn't in contact with the stove. The other reason this is an issue is that the heat has to be directed to the pot or the element will overheat and shut off. If you look at the element when it glows red through the glass you will see a dark line down the center, that is a thermal limiter that shuts the element off if it overheats. So most people end up with there element cycling on that thermal limiter rather than their control dial setting.

One other thing to note with glass top stoves is that the glass top acts as a heat sink. It retains heat rather well, thus glass top stoves don't have the same heat control as a gas top stove or an stove with exposed heating coils. There is no air flow around the heat source to cool it down quickly when you lower the heat control. So if you have a cast pot of water on the boil, when you turn down or up a gas burner you can almost see the bubbles come and go. With a glass stove the water may continue to boil for some time, until the residual heat goes out of the glass.

Sorry if I was too long winded, but hope that helps.
post #5 of 7
The glass top is surely a heat sink. I've tried to learn how to cook with a fancy glass/ceramic-top stove for five years now, and I still can't make the thing do anything like what I want it to do. If you're in a position to get a new stove - don't get one of these. whether electric or halogen. They are stylish as he!l - ours looks great - black glass on our black granite countertop - but will drive you out of your mind.

The temperature on our GE Profile is impossible to control or predict, and you can't turn down the heat during a cooking session, due to the great heat retention of the ceramic. You have to move your pot to a new burner and turn it on to the lower heat you need (and hope that's what you get.)

You also have to clean the thing continually and obsessively, otherwise any spatters or spills will bake onto the surface forever. It has to be cleaned with detergent, then scraped with a razor scraper, and then finished with a mild abrasive polish and a special sponge.

Believe me, you do NOT want one of these things, no matter how stylish they look.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #6 of 7
Copper saucepans tend to work well with glass-top ranges.
Jesse D. Starr
Marketing Assistant at http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com
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Jesse D. Starr
Marketing Assistant at http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com
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post #7 of 7
How does copper work better with glass top, besides just the benefit of copper on any cooking surface.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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