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EVO Mayo, oh dear god, the horror.

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
So as per my mayo substitute thread I decided I'd compromise and make EVO mayo.

I had exactly one cup of EVO left in an old bottle which was perfect as thats the amount I wanted to make.

I used my standard mayo recipe which is ...

dry mustard
lemon juice
egg
salt
sugar
white wine vinegar
and the oil.

So I make it, and .... it tasted just awful. I thought the oil might have been rancid being it was an older bottle. I live very close to a grocery store and picked up another bottle. It was awful too.

So is this normal? I'm guessing its why we have only recently had olive oil mayo on the shelves and why its on the sweet side.
post #2 of 9
Fresh or stale, most extra virgin olive oils are simply too strong. Generally, when making mayo with evoo, it's substantially diluted with something which has far less character. For instance, one might use two parts corn oil to one part extra virgin -- and that mayo would be reserved for something which could handle its strength.

Old olive oil is always iffy, because it does oxidize and deteriorate. If it was stale or, worse, rancid, that certainly woudn't have helped.

Better luck next time,
BDL
post #3 of 9
I enjoy olive oil mayo. However, did you use extra virgin? To me that would be too strong, I use Pomace or light.

Nan

Whoops, see it was extra virgin.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Well I have familial high cholesterol and I read somewhere that its best to make it with EVO from a health perspective.

Obviously those people never tested this theory :eek:

Its been a few hours and I still imagine I can taste it. It was that bad.
post #5 of 9
Doc the commercial olive oil mayo(kraft) contains other oils also most likely 1% olive oil by volume ,and a cheap one at that. In order to say olive oil it must contain 1 or 2%.by volume . Another example commercial potato salad and cole slaw advertised made with Hellmans mayo, as long as it contains 1% by volume it can advertise this. Our advertising standards sometimes are a joke. I truly find the only thing evo is good for is poured directly on greens or salad. Anything else it is not suitable in the original state not even marinades.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 9
I use veg oil for mayo/aioli.....light bertollis should work well too. EVO is just too strong.
sugar in your mayo?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #7 of 9
I've made mayo with EVOO before using the recipe in Joy of Cooking. I use a bamix commercial wand blender and it makes a consistency better than any blender, hand mixer, or food processor (Robot Coup) that I have.

I found it to be totally delicious. I think I was using either Bertolli or Colavita. But every OO has a different taste. Some are just awful tasting right out of the bottle. Some are delightfully fruity right out of the bottle. I taste the EVOO before I use it in something that remains uncooked.

doc
post #8 of 9
For many years i had no other oil in the house ever, because my inlaws would bring extra virgin olive from the country in large containers and I couldn't afford to buy any other oil.
So i decided to make mayonnaise once and of course used the olive. It was horrible. Then i discovered that they sell a very good commercial mayonnaise here (I like it at least, called Calve') and never thought to make it myself again. I've had home made mayonnaise (with mild oil) at people's houses, but I have to say the calve' is about as good. As one who makes everything from scratch, it's unusual for me to accept a commercial version of something.
Maybe it's just because i'm not all that crazy about mayonnaise anyway.

As for substitutes, i think substitutes are not a good solution. It makes more sense to me to find other kinds of sandwiches, that don;t require something like that to be good, and then very occasionally make soemthing with real mayonnaise.

When i lived in the states and did NOT like the commercial mayonnaise (even hellmans) I would make tuna salad sandwiches with oil and vinegar. Tuna, tomatoes, celery, parsley, onion, oil and vinegar. Put in a crusty roll, or in crusty bread, or a toasted pita and it is very good.

Sandwiches with prosciutto and sharp cheese and stuff like that go well with non-sweet pickles, pickled peppers, dried tomatoes, grilled eggplant. No mayonnaise at all.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
The original recipe I used called for a pinch, so I put it in. No reason beyond that.
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