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Matzo ball soup

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
I am looking for a recipe , matzo ball soup and I will be making it from scratch. I have made in the past but look forward to hearing of any good recipes , as no one soup is alike.

Thank you


Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 9
Are you looking for recipes for chicken soup or for Matzo Balls?
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #3 of 9
Petals, make your best chicken broth. Eastern European Jewish style may include all or some of the following: parsnip root, dill (seed and week), leek, onion, carrot, and/or a pinch of saffron. There are many other styles, but these seem to be pretty common. I know this has been discussed some time ago; a search will yield those threads.

For the matzo balls, many people consider the Manischewitz matzo ball mix to be quite tasty. Although I didn't grow up with them, I do like them. However, my grandmother (from Ukraine) and my mom (born in the USA) used just eggs, matzo meal and a pinch of salt. Others swear by adding baking powder, soda water or other secret ingredients but these will not be heavy. They'll be tender and light, although not as uniform or "perfect" as the hand-rolled matzo balls. I LOVE heavy ones, but this recipe has never produced that type yet.

Here's my family's recipe:

Use one egg per two people. Lightly beat the eggs in a bowl. Add salt to taste. Add matzo meal until the mixture is as thick as cooked cereal (cream of wheat or oatmeal, for example. Incorporate all the matzo meal into the egg. Don't overstir; stir just enough to combine. Smooth out the top a bit, cover with plastic wrap (or a plate) and refrigerate at least 30 minutes or up to a day.

In a 6 quart dutch oven (or so), add 4 quarts of water. Give the water some flavor with some of the stock or (heaven forbid) boullion cubes or stock flavoring. If none of these sounds good to you, you can simmer them in salted water. Since the matzo balls take up a lot of liquid, you don't want to cook them in the soup.

Using a soup spoon, heat the spoon in the simmering liquid. Scoop a spoonful from the side of the bowl. Put the spoon with batter into the liquid and gently shake the matzo ball off the spoon. The "ball" will be more like an almond or quenelle shape. Continue until you've used up all the batter. Cover the pot tightly and leave the matzo balls to simmer undisturbed. After 30 minutes, cut one in half to see that it's cooked through the center. When the matzo balls are done, gently put them into the soup to get some of the flavor. Or, you can keep them warm, put them in each soup bowl, and pour the soup (and the soup greens :lips:) over the matzo ball.

You can freeze them individually (set on baking sheet in the freezer, then store in a bag or container in the freezer) or in liquid to cover. My mom always froze the matzo balls in the soup.
Enjoy!
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post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
Chefhow : Yes, I am making both from scratch , recipe for the matzo balls and for the soup.

Mezzaluna : Thank you for your recipe, nothing warms the cockles of my heart like a bowl of Matzo ball soup. I am making for 20 clients.
When you spoke about greens, what did you mean by that ?

Thank you for the feedback


Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 9
Mezzaluna and I differ very slightly in our approach. Her recipe is more familial and homelike. Mine's a bit high-end and big city.

Matzo balls can be dense or light, herbed or plain, richly flavored or simple. These are light, herbed, and richly flavored. The richness (and some of the mouthfeel) comes from the use of schmaltz instead of oil. Unfortunately, fat breaks down the egg whites which takes away some lightness. I try to limit the effect by getting the dumplings into the pot as soon as possible after the egg whites are incorporated, but if you want supreme lightness you’ll eliminate the fat.

Almost all matzo ball recipes call for some fat – and most American recipes call for oil. My feeling is that if you don’t have schmaltz which provides a very specific taste and feel, forget the fat and take the lightness.

I’ve included optional baking powder in the recipe. It will lighten the matzo balls. It’s not technically “leavening,” at least not in the sense that it’s possible to find “Kosher for Passover” baking powder. However, if you object on kosher gournds, you don’t have to use it.



MATZO BALLS and MATZO BALL SOUP
(About 12 meal, or 18 soup course portions)


Ingredients:
4 eggs, separated
2 tsp schmaltz, melted butter, margarine, or vegetable oil (optional)
2 tbs finely minced fresh chives
1 or 2 tbs grated or finely minced onion
1 tbs finely chopped fresh dill
1 tsp finely chopped fresh tarragon
1/2 tsp finely chopped fresh thyme
1 tsp salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper
1/2 tsp double acting baking powder (optional)
2 tsp chilled seltzer, club soda, or chicken stock
1 cup matzo meal (4 or 5 matzos, ground to meal in blender)

Technique:
Make chicken stock in the usual way. When you separate the fat, reserve 2 tsp. Consider it magically converted from fat to schmaltz.

Set a kettle with 1 gallon water on the stove. Bring to the boil. Turn heat down to simmer.
Meanwhile, separate the eggs.

Beat the yolks with the (optional) schmaltz, herbs, salt and pepper until thickened. Chill.

In a separate bowl, beat the whites to soft peaks.

Set a sheet pan, covered with parchment or wax paper on your workspace.

Remove the yolk mixture from the refrigerator, and beat in the seltzer and baking powder.

Fold in the egg whites as gently as possible. Then sprinkle the matzo meal on top of the mix, and fold the meal in -- also as gently as possible. Allow to set up, about 10 minutes. During this period the whites are collapsing from the action of the fat on the bubble walls, as well as time itself. Consider the evanescent nature of existence.

Turn on the cold water tap, and wet your hands thoroughly, leave the tap running.

Use a 1 or 2 tbs (1 oz, 1/8 cup) scoop, to scoop a portion of matzo ball into your palm. Gently form it into a ball. Set the ball on the paper, rinse your hands again, and repeat the process until all of the mixture is used. Somewhere between 14 - 20 knaidlach (Yiddish for “dumplings,” a single dumpling is a knaidl).

With wet hands, put a ball into a slotted spoon or spider, then place it into the simmering water. Repeat until all dumplings are in the water. Cover the pot and allow to simmer for 20 minutes. Note: Dumplings which cook covered are lighter than dumplings that cook in an open pot. Check the pot to make sure the water is simmering, and not boiling.

While the dumplings simmer, bring 3 quarts of stock to the boil, then reduce the stock to a simmer. When the dumplings have simmered for 20 minutes in the water, transfer them to the stock and allow to simmer for another 15 minutes.

The dumplings may be refrigerated in just enough stock to cover, and held several days; or may be used immediately. If the knaidlach are held, the stock used to finish cooking them may be strained through a fine sieve and held as well. If the stock is meant to be used immediately (see below), straining is a very nice touch but not absolutely necessary.

To make matzo ball soup: Add a few fresh carrots, celery, etc., to the remaining stock and cook until the vegetables are almost tender. Then, add the matzo balls, the stock in which they were held, and heat just until warm.

Hope you like,
BDL

PS. The usual rigamarole. This is an original recipe. You have my permission to share it as long as you cite me, Boar D. Laze, as its creator. I'd consider it a kindness if you would mention my eventually to be finished book, COOK FOOD GOOD: American Cooking and Technique for Beginners and Intermediates.
post #6 of 9
For my soup its very simple:

1 whole chicken cut into 8 peices
2 onions rough chop
3 carrots rough chop
1 leek rough chopped
2 Bay leaves
2 sprigs Thyme

1.5 gal of water
S&P TT

I effectively make a very rich stock that is reduced by 10-15% to make it a soup. I strain the "stock", pull the chicken meat off the bone and add back into the soup. Season with salt and pepper.

For my Matzo Balls:

1c Matzo Meal
2 egg yolks plus 2 whole eggs beaten
1 small bottle of Seltzer cold
2 TBSP Schmaltz
S&P TT

Mix the eggs, schmaltz, and matzo meal together till there are no lumps, it will be EXTREMELY thick. Slowly add the cold seltzer until you have the consistency of oatmeal, season with salt and pepper. Cover and refridgerate for atleast 1 hour.

Bring soup back to a simmer.

Make matzo balls about the size of a golf ball with wet hands and dropping directly into the hot stock. Once all the balls have been added cover and cook for 35-40 minutes.

Sit back and enjoy.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
Reply
post #7 of 9
Thread Starter 
J'ai mon voyage !

Two variations.....(from 2 great Chefs)

Thank you so much for the detailed explanations.

I will make a phone call to get the schmaltz in, I feel it is so important to do things authentically.

.... everything else is on the go.....(cooking)


A good designer must rely on experience, on precise, logic thinking; and on pedantic exactness. No magic will do.
Niklaus Wirth


PS. The cream sauce for the Mussels was a hit ! I attributed the menu to your design as it was not mine but yours.
For dessert , I served up some small glasses of "Sortilege" and a hand made truffle with gold pieces on top which I had made the day before.
This was an absolute success. The Tarte Tatin , was just enough, I had five slices left over, I made 3- 10' pies. I posted the recipe.
The presentation for the thongs received an applause. Formibable.
Merci Beaucoup

Encore dans mon "Keepsake" book !

Petals

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 9
About me, ahem. About Mezzaluna, she sure has a teriffic feel for food. Writes nicely, too!



:blush: Tongs. Not thongs. Tongs. For heaven's sake, woman! Tongs. :blush:

Your tarte tatin recipe was great. Especially your "upside down" technique. A definite keeper.

Thanks, and...

When I was cooking I used to keep "running recipes" in my notebooks which were bare ingredients, interspersed with sequences, as opposed to a formal presentation of quantities, and descriptions and explanations of technique. Over the years, I've done some teaching and wrote the recipes which were part of the classe. A few years ago, I started participating in barbecue forums and started writing more broadly for other people. But it wasn't until landing here, that I figured out I wanted to focus on the beginner and intermediate range.

All of which is a long-winded way of saying, it's just so incredibly flattering to get a response as positive as yours, from a cook as skilled as you. I'm honored.

BDL
post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
Dearest Mezzaluna : I love your thoughts, your ideas on food and your approach, thank you for your wonderful input , I always look forward to hearing from you !

Grand Chef BDL:
hahaha ...tongs !!!!! Pardon my vocabulary, must laugh ....it makes for a good day.

If I make a mistake in writing, "I expect and want to be corrected". It is the only way to learn and remember.


I hope you do not mind, but I will frame your comment and hang it in my office !


Petals



ps. Your loyal followers await your next Blog Monsieur Grand Chef !
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
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