or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Beer Chicken

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Easy recipe for moist and delicious chicken.

Whole chicken cleaned, drizzled with olive oil, salt/pepper, and what ever else you want in regards to seasoning.

Drink half a beer (from a can).

Dump some chopped garlic into the remaining 1/2 can of beer.

Insert the beer can into the bottom of the chicken and sit it in your BBQ (or oven). Close up the top part of the chicken if the opening is too big. Slow cook at about 375degrees until the chicken is done. The steam coming out of the beer keeps the meat flavored and moist. GOOD STUFF!

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #2 of 15
Have always wanted to try it. What sort of beer do you use, heavy/light/draft/lager/stout? It probably doesn't matter.... Would a can of coke work also?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #3 of 15
Yummy! This sounds really good. Makin' me hungry. Definitely want to try this recipe out!!!
post #4 of 15
Checkout beer can chicken recipes at this website.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 15
I've done a few BCC, but the best is a brined chick. I also like to spatchcock them. I honestly think that the BCC is over-rated. Just my opinion though.

FWIW, all mine are cooked on a smoker.
post #6 of 15

Beer Chicken

You can also try some soda like sprite or any other product. The aroma and the nutrients any canned drinks will go deep into the meat. :thumb:
post #7 of 15
Really?
:lol:

I can see flavor from a soda, but nutrients?

Just playing with ya.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
post #8 of 15
Spatchcock? I give up, what's spatchcock?
post #9 of 15
Spatchcocking is another name for butterflying a bird. The backbone is removed entirely, and bird is opened -- butterfly style -- before cooking. Some people also trim or remove the keelbone to get the bird flatter still. Smaller birds are often held open with skewers.

If you look around the net you'll find speculation that the term comes from combining "dispatch" and "cook." This not only seems remarkably stupid, the single best source, the OED, says the origin is unknown. There's a very similar term, "spitchcock" which relates to opening an eel. Undoubtedly the two are of related origin, with perhaps the only difference being regional pronounciation.

Spatchcocking is an excellent technique for grilling or broiling chicken. Spatchcocked birds sit flatter and cook more evenly than halves.

When it comes to smoking, it may help get more smoke in the bird faster. But considering that "not enough smoke" is seldom a problem with chicken, there's probably not any very good reason to bother spatchcocking a bird before smoking it. Well, style points maybe; and those do count.

BDL
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
What were we talking about?
 
http://www.cookfoodgood.com
Reply
post #10 of 15
thanks BDL - - you're an awesome source of info and when I grow up, I wanna be just like you!
post #11 of 15
A lot of people use the terms "butterfly" and "spatchcock" interchangeably. In fact, a recent reference I saw says that butterfly is the American word, and spatchcock the British.

That same source, btw, says that the word comes from combining "disptach" and "cock" (i.e, rooster). Which would make more sense than dispatch and cook, but is still open to question.

I was taught, early on, that if you merely remove the backbone and flatten the bird it's butterflying; but if you go on to remove the ribs and breastbone (i.e., only bones left behind are the leg and wing bones) it is spatchcocking.

Spatchcocking the way I use it is more often confined to smaller birds, like quail. And in that case, as BDL notes, skewers are often used to keep the bird flat.

Keep in mind too that in addition to looking better, spatchcocking (in either sense of the word) means the bird will cook faster, everything else being equal.

And the fact is, "spatchcocking" is a sexier way of saying it.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #12 of 15
Martha Stewart and a guest cook spatchcocked a chicken yesterday on her show. How coincidental is that? I've seen that done (and in fact have done it to cornish hens), but never knew the term it. Gues in my life it was just described as take out the backbone and flatten the bird. Learn something new every day. :smiles:
post #13 of 15
Sounds very tasty! :beer:
post #14 of 15

re

this make me feeling hungry. Thanks for recipe, sounds delicious. will definitely try this one
post #15 of 15
Just don't try doing it in the microwave
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes

Gear mentioned in this thread: