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leave bread for later

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
i love bread but if i have it ready to eat i'll finish it in a second, so a few days a go i made for the first time pizza from scratch and i was thinking is there anyway i can leave the dough ready on fridge so that when i want to eat it i'll have to wait watever time it takes to bake on the oven?
so i make the dough, save it and bake it for when i really want to eat bread, giving me a safety time of i guess at least 20 minutes before over endulging
post #2 of 7
Although I've never tried it, I think that certain doughs can be frozen or, at least, well chilled sufficiently that yeast action is halted.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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post #3 of 7
Most bread doughs can be stored in the fridge---some for as much as two or three days. Normally it's part of a delayed fermentation process. Short term, like for a few hours, works as well. But they have to be taken out one-two hours before using so as to take the chill off and let them proof as needed.

That being the case, I don't see what would be served with the pizza. Instead, just make it so that your timing is right for shaping and baking.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 7
Yes you can chill pizza dough. Chilling "retards" the proof by a great deal, and you can hold the dough in the refrigerator up to a couple of days.

Think about it, stores sell ready to bake, fresh pizza from their refrigerators. Obviously, that dough is refrigeated. Also, many stores now sell ready-to-use refrigerated pizza dough. Why not yours as well?

Here's how:

Mix the dough as usual, and let it rise as usual. After its "proofed" to double its volume, cut it into serving quantities. Pick up a piece of dough and "pull it down" into a ball. Flatten the ball, wrap it cling wrap, and store in the refrigerator. Do the same with the rest of the dough. Alternatively, you can store pizza dough in the refrigerator fairly successfully -- but it's not quite as good as fresh or refrigerated.

The dough will continue to rise in the refrigerator, but very slowly. The rise will not only be controlled by the refrigerator but by the constriction of the wrap.

When you're ready to bake, remove the dough from the refrigerator and allow it to come to temp on the counter -- this allows the dough to become flexible, it has nothing to do with proofing.

When the dough is warm enough to handle, about ten minutes, form your crust, sauce and top as usual. You may then bake at any time.

Buena suerte,
BDL
post #5 of 7
You may find that retarding the dough in the fridge will give it a better flavor as the enzymes will have been given more time to work their chemical magic in converting the dough's starches into sugars.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 7
the idea of premaking dough and storing it in the refrigerator for later use is the premise behind the book Artisan Baking in 5 minutes per day--check it out of you haven't read it. You mix up bread dough and use it for bread, rolls, pizza, flat bread - whatever you fancy over a period of a week or two
post #7 of 7

Freezing pizza dough.

I just roll my pizza dough out into the circles, and freeze like that.
once frozen I put a peice of parchment paper between each cicles and store in a large bag. taking out just what I want it, by the time I have a topping ready the base is thawed out. qahtan
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