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Court-Bouillon

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
We all know that the object of making a court-bouillon is to impart some flavour to the water which will then impart flavour to the fish.

Some cooks use half water, half wine Is this too much ?

The trick is not to put to much vinegar.


Escoffier (for turbot I believe) says to use milk /water , no vegetables or herbs but just lemon.

What would be the right Court-Bouillon ?

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

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(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #2 of 9
I've never used wine, vinegar or milk in my court bouillon. I just put some aromatic veggies and seasoning/spices in water. I do use a liberal amount of lemon, as I always do with all things fish and seafood. I just quarter lemons and put them in the water.

The "right" court bouillon? I suppose there's no such thing....
post #3 of 9
I would use 1/4 the amount of white wine to water, then the usual carrot, onion, celery, bayleaf and loads of peppercorns. + lemons + salt
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #4 of 9
I would start with a Fume, why would you cook anything in water when you can use a "stock" instead.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #5 of 9
The lemon /vinegar are in the court-boullion for a reason.

All fish have a slippery layer on them, it's what helps them glide through the water, and makes them slippery to catch. Acid in the C.B will make this slippery layer opaque and a light blue.

Milk was added in other c.b's when poaching "white vegetables" like Cauliflower and fennel. Some C.B's also use a bit of flour and water for the same purpose. I've never done this and don't see the need to either.

A true "White C.B." NEVER has carrots or any "coloured" vegetables in it (This, according to the ancients, Escoffier and Pauli).

So, there are C.B's for whole fish, for poultry, and for vegetables.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 9
Chefhow, I dont savvy a fume. Could you enlighten me. And also the attributes of Fume v Court boullion. If I can improve my salmon, i'll be v v happy
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #7 of 9
OK, now "I" need educating, perhaps mistakenly, I was taught that "fumé" was French for "smoked" and "fumet" was French for a concentrated stock, generally fish or muushroom based. Thugh pronounced nearly the same, they means two differerent things.

Have I been misinformed?
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #8 of 9
My bad on the typo, I was in gridlock rush hour traffic when I was surfing on my phone(sheer boredom) I meant to add a "t" to the end.

It is a "stock" that is, in this case fish based, light in color but reduced to concentrate the flavor of the fish. I have always used it as a base for a court bouillion when poaching fish. I have always made them with a leaner white fish heads and trimmings, a touch of vinegar, white peppercorns, leeks, celery, dill, parsley, bayleaf and thyme. All that goes into the pot, bring to a boil, cover and reduce to a simmer. Cook for 1 hour. Strain and then reduce by 25%.
Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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Taste: The sensation derived from food, as interpreted thru the tongue to brain sensory system.
Flavor: The overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel and trigeminal perception.
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post #9 of 9
Is an hour not a long time for a fish stock?
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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