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Failing miserably at successfully making taffy

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
i think salt water taffy is one of the prettiest candies out there, and i have wanted for some time to make some myself.
i have tried several different recepes found in cook-books and on the internet, but every time i seem to do something wrong and it comes out as hard candy that you cannot pull.
i once tried to pull it while it was still hot, and just got pulled hard candy that burnt my fingers.
i don't know anyone that has successfully made it in their own home.
i am stubborn, and refuse to give up.
if anyone has successfully made salt water taffy, i would love to hear how you did it, or maybe get some troubleshooting help.


some of the things i have done:
my thermometer is 25 degrees off, so i have adjusted the recipes accordingly, but fear that might be the reason it doesn't work.

i have tried setting the stove at low, medium, medium high, and increasing the temperature as the sugar cooks. all of them brought me the same result.

i have tried boiling to 250 degrees, 260 degrees 270 degrees with all the same result.

i have tried putting the salt in at the beginning, and at the end.

i have tried putting the colouring and flavouring in at the end, and after it cooled a bit.

i have tried waiting for it to cool, and i haver tried pulling it prematurely.

I NEED HELP!!!
post #2 of 9
Acwilde, I hope I can help you...please follow these steps to " precise detail " and you "will" succeed.

Ingredients:


2 cups of sugar
2 tbsp corn starch
1 cup light brown syrup
3/4 cup of water (room temperature)
2 tbsp of margarine (not butter)
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp of your favorite flavour oil
food coloring (however dark you would like it)

Please go step by step now:

1- In a heavy "sauce pan" , combine sugar and cornstarch. Then stir in corn syrup, water, salt and margarine.

2- Cook over a medium heat until sugar dissolves. Cover the pan and bring to a boil for no more than 2-3 minutes.

3- Uncover, put "candy" thermometer in pan and cook to 266 degrees F (not more than that). Remove from heat and add food coloring and flavoring oil.

4- Stir " slowly ", pour onto a shallow "greased" pan to "cool down"

5- When cool enough to handle , grease your hands (with margarine) and "pull " until light in color and that it has a "satiny gloss" ( when you see satiny....VOILA ! )

Pull into a long rope, cut into desired sizes and wrap. Do not refrigerate.

Alors, I wish you much success with this project and please let me know how it worked out for you.

Soit Positive toujours.....

Bonne chance

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #3 of 9
I'd ditch the candy thermometer and get a digital thermometer with a remote probe. They cost about $25 but will give you a much more accurate reading. Using the remote allows you to clip the probe on to the side of the pan and put the actual unit elsewhere. I put my unit on the stove hood with its magnetic back and dangle the probe into the pan with the sugar. I keep the probe in place and away from the hot burner with a clip clothes pin. I also keep a glass of water handy to pop the hot probe into when you've reached temp, so it will be easy to clean.
post #4 of 9
Thread Starter 
hello kyakado.
i have looked into digital thermometers, and all the ones i have found don't go over 240 degrees. and i need 260 for candy making.

if i ever find one, though, i will definately jump on it.
post #5 of 9

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 9
Digital thermometers with remote probes are used for baking and commonly go to 392º F that is plenty high enough for sugar work, but you can find ones that go to 450ºF. They are very common Walmart and target carry them. Food Service supplies will carry the top end ones.
post #7 of 9
Kayakado, can you please post the recipe and original method you used? That's always a good place to start.
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post #8 of 9
Thread Starter 
was wondering how long it is supposed to take to boil to 260. because it always seems like it takes way too long for it to climb the last ten degrees. to the point that one of the times i tried, it started smelling burnt before it reached the right tempurature.
post #9 of 9
Taffy is not impossible for the home cook. My mom grew up during the last Great Depression and she spoke of the great fun of a taffy pull at most parties she attended. As cooking thermometers were not common to all kitchens, it was checking a drop of candy in cold water that determined doneness. (this was all part of my early kitchen education) I guess taffy would be soft ball stage. I would spend my money on the best non reactive pan I could afford.
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