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Feedback Please: Balsamic Glaze

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Balsamic Glaze




This is one of the most versatile foods I enjoy applying to a dish. It is simple and easy to make and goes with just about everything, cheese, meat, poultry, fish/seafood, lamb, pork, vegetables......


It has wonderful taste !


Put 2 cups of balsamic vinegar (a good vinegar) in a small pot.


Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer for 40 minutes ( I like it thick) or until the balsamic vinegar has
become thick enough to coat the back of a spoon, taste and see....


2 cups reduced should make ½ cup of glaze.


Remove from heat, cool down, and refrigerate.




Does anyone enjoy this glaze as much as I ? Do you have another recipe or take on this ?

Merci

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #2 of 9
I've usually seen it called balsamic tar.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 9
Linda loves anything balsamic, so we do it too of course. Anyway it's terriffic and incredibly versatile (from beef to strawberries), and I hope a lot of CT readers see your post Chef Petal.

As an aside, if one takes an inexpensive balsamic, say Trader Joe's or Roland, and reduces it by about 10% to 20%, the result is a fair approximation of a 5 - 10 year old. BUT (big but) only for cooking purposes. When using balsamic "raw," as in a salad dressing or mignonette, you'll taste the budget. Darn it!

BDL
post #4 of 9
Just to add a bit to this as far as technique. I never boil the vinegar as I believe it adds an acrid taste. I put a heavy bottomed pot on a heat deflector and very, very slowly reduce the vinegar, no bubbles at all. Although it takes a bit longer, the finished product is superior, imho.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 9
Thread Starter 
Merci Cape Chef,


I will try this technique for next batch of tar.

It is all in the technique....mais oui !

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 9
Je conviens :thumb:
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
post #7 of 9
Here's a great appetizer (or entree, I guess)

Plate a slice of fresh mozzarella cheese.
Saute a large sea scallop in olive oil
Plate the finished scallop on the cheese slice.
Deglaze the pan with balsamic vinegar, reduce until it's sweet syrup.
Pour the hot vinegar over the scallop and cheese.
Garnish with basil chiffonade.

The cold cheese, warm scallop, hot sweet syrupy balsamic.
Ohhhhhh!
(anyone got a cigarette?)
post #8 of 9
Sounds delicious Todd!

I too am a big fan of "Balsamic Tar." I drizzle it on virtually everything I can think of (I even tried it on vanilla ice cream - not bad!).
post #9 of 9
Another very good balsamic is the 365 brand that whole foods carries. Very good for the price and better than many others I've tried that cost a lot more.
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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