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Baking Cookies

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I need some help. Everytime I bake cookies, such as chocolate chip cookies, they always come out too hard, even though they are soft when I first remove them from the oven. I like my baked cookies nice and chewy, but can never achieve that. How long should you bake cookies for in the oven, and at what temperature. I would like to have some sort of a general guideline. I've tried waiting until they are just golden but that never turn out chewy. And my chocolate chip cookies always turn out flat, any suggestions for my problems....

Any advice would be appreciated...Thank-you.
post #2 of 11
If you repost your question in the correct forum, I'm sure one of our members will be able to assist you!

PS I said 'hello' in reply to your previous thread.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
oh Hello there,
I'm sorry I'm just checking my mail now. I will go and try to place it in the correct forum...
post #4 of 11
OKay so, I have had some of your same issues in the past. I can't tell you a temp because every oven is different you kind of need to just learn from trial and error with that. It will be somewhere between 325-375 though. Secondly, with the flat cookies- check your baking powder/baking soda. If these have been on your shelf for a while, they are probably expired. As a rule of thumb I find its best to replace them every couple of months. To get chewy cookies, I never wait till they are "golden brown" I take them out when they are still a bit under cooked. Before they are even really golden at all. That way they stay that soft cookie that it sounds like you are looking for. Goodluck!
post #5 of 11
I certainly agree with Tangy, above. Careful with baking cookies until 'done.' Remove them when set, if that makes sense. Also, consider the fat you are using. If using butter, you will generally have a crispy cookies. Conversely, when using margarine, you will get a soft, chewy cookies. Lastly, consider cooling the cookies with limited air circulation; specifically, on a table with a solid surface versus on a speed rack/cooling rack.
Good luck and let us know how it turns out!
(Have a little experience with this ;) Cooks and Bakers | Baking the Night Away

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #6 of 11
hi i watched the saturday kitchen last week and the hairy bikers were baking cookies and they said for soft chewy ones they add i think it was sunflower oil to their mix.
post #7 of 11
already been answered but here's all the important points for cakey cookies, perhaps it will help explain whats going wrong:

1. flour to water; cakey cookies should be 100 parts flour to 38 parts water (but that in grams in divide for a simple recipe answer).

2. Protein content of flour; higher protein flours will absorb more water and form stiffer bonds, making the cookey stiffer. Ideal protein content is an all purpose 7-9%)

3. Sugar; As the sugars melt at higher temperatures they dilute the mix and will cause the batter to spread, and will crytsalise into a crunchy texture when cooled. You can save this by reducing oven temperature and/or substituting some of the table sugar for another form of sugar (honey, corn syrup, molasses...etc...).

4. Eggs; eggs are the gelling agents for moisture in the cookies; it should be around 30 parts egg by weight to the other ingredients (not 30%- put it into grams to think simply).

5. Fat; lubricates and distorts the flours proteins. However this encourages the cookie to spread. Especially butter! (butter is about 15% water which will dilute the batter- and melts at a lower temperature, which allows for a longer time for the batter to spread before its sets), vegetable oils will give you a much more consistent result, unless you reduce the water to include the water that will be released from the butter.

6. Baking; over-baking dries out the cookie. Under-baking produces a chewier result, with more moisture trapped in the starch gels. Use a lower oven temp, to control the heat of the cookies more (higher temps set faster, but can continue cooking the cookie with residual heat)

Hope this helps.
post #8 of 11
o0o0 sunflower oil-interesting suggestions. I might have to try it though because I do like the chewy cookies too :)
post #9 of 11
Thanks for the recipe.I will definitely try it.I was looking for it from a long time.Its really yummy.
post #10 of 11
You can also swap out some of the regular sugar for brown sugar. Brown sugar is more hygroscopic (attracts moisture) and holds more moisture in the cookie, thus making it chewier. Also, cooking at a higher temp reduces the spread of cookies, which can help make them denser and chewier. Hope these tips help!
"Of course the more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. At some point, I hope to learn enough to realize that I know nothing at all. Then maybe I'll be able to snatch a pebble from Julia Child's hand"
- Alton Brown
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"Of course the more I learn, the more I realize I don't know. At some point, I hope to learn enough to realize that I know nothing at all. Then maybe I'll be able to snatch a pebble from Julia Child's hand"
- Alton Brown
Reply
post #11 of 11
the texture of the cookie depend on the kinds and amount of ingredients that you have and the way you mix them. I've seen many cooking shows that bakes cookies in different ways and they come out in different textures too. I'm an avid fan of Lifestyle Network. I learn a lot from their shows.
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