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Translations from a Euro Cookbook

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
I'm working from a Euro cookbook and need help with a few ingredient translations to North American soil.

1. Several recipes refer to so many "sheets of gelatin". What does that correspond to in our U.S. gelatin measures (say, packets or teaspoons of powdered Knorrs gelatin)?

2. Another dessert recipe calls for Australian Fromage Blanc (10% fat), but notes that a similar soft cheese can be substituted. American cream cheese is typically 35 to 40 percent fat. A possible stand-in sounds to me like it might be a whole milk ricotta or maybe a creamed cottage cheese. Any thoughts.

I have the feeling I may be back with more questions, but I'd appreciate any help on these two for now. This forum hasn't failed me yet. Thanks.
post #2 of 10
1 packet of Knox (not Knorr) gelatin = 4 sheets gelatin

The closest and only good substitute to fromage blanc is quark.

You're welcome,
BDL
post #3 of 10
Which I've never seen outside of Europe either. But I'm probably locationally benighted. what about a drained so-called yogurt cheese?
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thank you boar_d_laze (once again). I'm afraid I had to look up quark in Wikipedia (to me, it was an elementary particle of the up and down variety). I will try our local cheese merchant, but I'm not sure I'll find it. It also sounds as if its fat content can be all over the map. Again, searching around for substitute substitutes should I fail to find the Real Substitute, quark sounds a bit like what we used to call "baker's cheese", though if you're not a baker, that can be hard to get as well.

Sorry about Knorrs for Knox; a momentary disconnect between the brain and the fingers on the keyboard. Increasingly frequent as I age. I've inscribed the gelatin quantity conversion in my cooking notebook for future reference.

JonK
post #5 of 10
Good call. Something like paneer might just do the trick -- depending on what you're trying to do.

If you can't find quark, it's pretty easy to make. Pour a quart or so of buttermilk in a baking pan, cover it, and put it in the oven at the lowest setting -- 150F is good -- overnight. Then line a colander or seive with a couple of layers of cheesecloth, pour off the buttermilk into the prepared strainer, and set the cheese to drain in the refrigerator -- somewhere in the neighborhood of 6 hours. Take it out of the strainer when you like the texture. You're done.

If you want to get fancy about controlling the amount of butter fat, clabber your own milk or milk and cream mixture with a live culture -- you'll neet to allow extra oven time for the initial clabbering.

Similarly for paneer, just put some yogurt in a cheese-cloth lined strainer and let it drain until you're happy with it. Try and use whole milk yogurt; and remember the thicker the yogurt is when you start (Greek or Indian style), the faster the whole thing goes, and the more even the final texture.

No matter how baroque you take these, as "science projects" go, they're easier and less messy than a vinegar volcano. If a 7 year old can do it, why not you?

BDL
post #6 of 10
KRAFT BRAND Philidelphia cream cheese o fat 0 transfat:look:
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post #7 of 10
KRAFT BRAND Philidelphia cream cheese o fat 0 transfat:look:
Add a little reg. to reach 10% fat content
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post #8 of 10
Regular cream cheese, whether Kraft Philadelphia or some other brand, runs about 33% fat.

Neufchatels vary, but Philly Neufchatel is 23% fat.

Philly Light, and other light (or lite) creamcheeses, tend to come in around 16 or 17% fat.

"Fat Free" Philadelphia cream cheese is inedible.

BDL
post #9 of 10
Fat free cheese, in general, is inedible.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #10 of 10
I believe he is trying to make a cheesecake, where flavorings and sugar is added. Therefore it won't taste that bad.
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