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Cooking Chicken

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
Hello, This is my first time here, I just have one (hopefully simple) question for everyone: I want to know what the best way to cook chicken breasts is so that it turns out juicy, not chewy, and dry.

Thank you :)
post #2 of 26
Wrap them.

Wrap them individually in tin foil with a little butter.

Variations can be to add some sliced mushrooms or chop some garlic, fresh herb of your choice and either make slit and insert or spread over the top . . . whatever you feel like.

I would cook for about 35 to 40 minutes in a 200ºC oven.
David
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David
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post #3 of 26

Welcome shmooey

Well first, What type of breast and how are you preparing them?

At home or at work I always cook my chicken skin on and on the bone, This in it's own will increase the moisture. You can always remove the skin and bone the ribs and keal when your done.

If you are sauteeing the breast leave the skin on and cook it skin side down till crisp, flip it over and continue cooking the flesh side, Pop it in a 400 degree oven for 8-10 minutes, remove and deglaze with whatever you are happy with. I think chicken lends itself to simple preparations, although it requiers a good flavor kick. I know that people are concerned with there fat intake and this should always be takin into consideration especially if you are being monitered for any specific health issues. I also believe it is worth the search for free range birds and get away from the force feed sardine factory chickens. although the muscule may be a little tougher, it will give you superior flavor.

I love to just simply rub rosemary and sage with olive oil between the skin and the flesh, season with kosher salt and milled pepper, place the bird on a miropoix and throw in tons of garlic, and candy some shallots with butter,maderia and suger.

Thats it...simple but pleasant. some mashed spuds, seasonal veg, a loaf of Kyles bread and a white burgundy
cc

PS...The less fat you have in a protien the faster it should be cooked
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 26
Breasts are tough (not a pun!). I use thighs whenever I can. They're a pain because there's so much fat to snip out and you end up with an oddly shaped thing if it's boned. BUT the meat will stay moist and tasty.

If I'm forced to use breasts, I bone them, then pound them lightly so that they are the same thickness all over. Then you can quickly pan-fry them or throw them on the grill briefly. The secret is to be brave and lean toward undercooked rather than overcooked. You don't want red, but you don't want them much beyond that either.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thank you for The Suggestions everyone, I will be sure to try them out! :lips:
post #6 of 26
I generally avoid breasts because they are too lean and simply don't have the taste that thighs do. But If I have to I soak them in brine for about 30 minutes.
About half a cup of Kosher salt in a quart of water should do it. You can also add a few tablespoons of sugar.
What happens is that the salt water passes through what is called a semi permiable membrane in the meat tissue. That means the water can get in but not out again - it is trapped inside the meat. Your meat is now seasoned from the inside and will stay moist because of the added water. The sugar helps to give the meat extra flavor and color as it caramelizes.
If you use this method, don't salt the meat before cooking or it will be too salty.

Jock

btw, pork and shrimp also benefit from brining.
post #7 of 26

Actually a dark meat fan myself...

...Are you pounding the chicken breasts? This helps to compromise the muscle tissue and tenderize them.

I often wonder how chicken breast can come out so mouth wateringly tender in one place and sub for a floor mat in another.

If you're using whole breasts, it's best to fillet them first, then pound, then cook as directed. DON'T OVERCOOK THEM. White meat takes "two shakes" to cook and if you cook it longer than advised, it can toughen up because the muscle strands contract, bunching up the meat.
Food is sex for the stomach.
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Food is sex for the stomach.
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post #8 of 26

A related question...

For any of those who have prepared "home grown" chickens-

I know that chickens you raise yourself tend to be tougher than store bought chickens (mainly because they get to run around and develop muscle, whereas factory farm chickens don't) and I wonder if there are some good ideas on making the meat more tender in general.

Here's what I know-

When butchering, don't allow the chicken/rooster to beat its wings after it's been killed. I forget why, but it toughens the meat further (something about the blood flow)

And that's actually it. Any other ideas? Aside from what's been mentioned above, of course. :) I assume those will work as well for a "fresh" chicken.
If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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post #9 of 26

SLOW KILL AND ADRENALINE

Ever heard deer hunters state how differently meat tastes from a deer that's been killed slowly. It smells differently, too. That's because (I THINK) an adrenaline release has occurred during the slow expiration process. I THINK that the same occurs with chicken that dies slowly.

Going further, you've all heard how dogs can sense something wrong. Perhaps it's the scent of adrenaline exuded by the potential perpetrator that arouses the dog.

Agressive animals produce much adrenaline. I.E. fighters.
Animals that are typically pursued produce much noradrenaline, a precursor to adrenaline. I.E. Flighters

:eek: :eek: :eek: :cool: :eek: :eek:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #10 of 26
Remember that the breast has two components--the main muscle and the tenderloin, the little strip underneath closest to the bone. I usually try to strip the white connective tissue out of the tenderloin or take that out and treat it differently than the main muscle. Let's face it though there are chickens and there are CHICKENS. If the fat is almost white instead of yellow one is dealing with a grown in a box chicken and the flavor is not going to be there like a free range fed critter. As has been stated, you have to doctor it up, cook it quickly.

And speaking about chickens, would I ever like to find an fat old setting hen (non Leghorn) to make chicken and noodles or roast with dressing. They just don't make chickens like they used to.

Rue
Rue
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Rue
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post #11 of 26
I saw some black chickens when I was in Chinatown on Monday. They're pretty freaky lookin'! Anyone ever tried cooking one? Do they look different than the regular ones once they are cooked?

From what I understand, they are not as tasty as regular chicken, but they are given to women recovering from childbirth...
post #12 of 26
kokopuffs, do you mean that a slow-killed deer would taste better or more "gamey"? I understood that they would taste different, just not sure what the general concensus is on which way tastes better.

However, I don't think I could slow-kill anything. I want it to be quick and painless as possible for the poor animal. Though I don't have any ethical barriers to eating meat, I don't believe in prolonging suffering more than necessary. The first time I saw a rooster killed, it was awful- the hatchet didn't make a clean cut so I wasn't sure if he died on the first stroke or the second! :eek::eek: Ok, that was probably more information than any of you wanted to know. :o

Anyway. I don't know if black chickens would taste any different from other chickens. I'm guessing the different breeds have slight taste differences based on what breed they are (the type of food they're given might also affect flavor). My mom's birthday is February and I'm buying her some Buff Orpingtons. Not only do they make "good eatin" (as my hubby would say:)) but they are fairly good layers and are good setters too- so no incubators needed!:bounce: :bounce:
If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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If you don't ask, you'll never know.
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post #13 of 26

Slow Kill

Roon:

What I've heard is that the meat is tougher and has some odor in addition to its natural gamey flavor.

As to myself, I don't believe in slow kill either.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #14 of 26
YUCK! Another one of my Grandmother's concoctions when I was ill. The "proper" thing to do would be to buy one, stop by the apothecary and ask for the appropriate herbs to cure what ails you. I can't recall how it tastes, it all got flushed when I had the chance. Maybe with some Mung Bean pancakes it might be good... yeah.

Kuan
post #15 of 26
:lol: :lol: :lol:
post #16 of 26
In biology class we used to zap dead frogs with electricity to see how the nervous system worked. Not a very nice experience. We used to slit the neck and drain the blood from the chicken by pumping the heart while holding the neck back. About those eggs, the one with the red blood in the yolk is a fertilized one. Halfway to being balut... or are you sure that's not what you were eating? :) :)

Kuan
post #17 of 26
Heads up, Afra. The residual blinking and flapping occur, all due to neurologic chemical reactions ongoing within the spinal cord and peripheral nerves (that go to the various body parts) after the head has been severed. The movements subside because the chemicals haven't been replenished.

Similar post-mortem movements have been noted among those who've been beheaded at the guillotine.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #18 of 26
Gawsh we've really gone off track here. From how to cook chicken to beheading chickens. BTW, you're welcome koko :) I wonder... would you be aware that you've been beheaded? At least for a split second? That must feel awful.

Kuan

PS: "Heads up Afra?" :) LOL
post #19 of 26
Kuan:

Beheadees have reportedly been requested to signal to their observers after the beheading that they were "perceptive" post-mortem. Observations of movements exhibited by the post-mortem head showed that they were, indeed, perceptive.

Is the head dead yet? Heaven only knows. Vocal communication by the post-mortem head was impossible but it seemed to gasp as though it were attempting to vocalize words. And, upon poking the eyes with pins, the face exhibited an astonished expression. Is the head dead yet or were these simple reflexes due to neurologic responses as opposed to conscious intervention? :mad: :rolleyes: :mad:

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #20 of 26

From the frying pan to the guillotine

Thanks for illustrating why I love coming here to learn about food and collect inspiration.

No, I'm not being sarcastic. A good chuckle is worth its weight in white truffles.
post #21 of 26
I served such postings with the intent of being educational and informative! Food for thought!

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #22 of 26
And you were Koko. Thoroughly! ;)

..Thank you.
post #23 of 26
yes Koko you were really informative! Is that what they teach at chiro school??Or are you behind the man beef site?:p
Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO...
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Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO...
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post #24 of 26

LITERACY

I love you , too, Rachel. Having a degree in French from Berkeley I tend to be somewhat literate.

But no, at chiro school they teach us straight diagnosis, neurology, radiology, adjusting among other straight/hardcore sciences. The beheading information was, instead, gleaned from a book whose title is something along the lines of "Interesting Medical Occurrences" - I forgot the exact title.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #25 of 26
I never doubted your education or culture kokopuffs - just your taste in reading;) ;) :D
But now that we've started, what other interesting medical occurences did you read about? Or is that A Late Night Cafe thread??
Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO...
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Remember this motto to live by: "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, martini in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming "WOO HOO...
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post #26 of 26

Woke me up

:lol: :lol: :lol: Rachel. Kokopuffs, your posts are ALWAYS educatonal, and keep my interest. I started out sleepily reading,
but this thread sure woke me up!
Laughter is the medicine of life
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Laughter is the medicine of life
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