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Beef Bourguignon

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi Everyone!

I plan to make this dish and in looking at the recipe, it requires a 1/2 cup of Cognac to be burned off. This will be my first time doing this. Does anyone have any pointers? I'm wondering how will I know when enough alcohol has burned off. Also, any suggestions on a good brand of Cognac and rum? I am also making Baked Apples and I want to soak the raisins in some rum. The recipe for the Bourguignon is below . . .

Beef Bourguignon

Copyright Ina Garten, All rights reserved
Prep Time: 30 min Inactive Prep Time: -- Cook Time: 1 hr 15 min Level: Intermediate Serves: 6 servings
Ingredients
  • <LI class=ingredient>1 tablespoon good olive oil <LI class=ingredient>8 ounces dry cured center cut applewood smoked bacon, diced <LI class=ingredient>2 1/2 pounds chuck beef cut into 1-inch cubes <LI class=ingredient>Kosher salt <LI class=ingredient>Freshly ground black pepper <LI class=ingredient>1 pound carrots, sliced diagonally into 1-inch chunks <LI class=ingredient>2 yellow onions, sliced <LI class=ingredient>2 teaspoons chopped garlic (2 cloves) <LI class=ingredient>1/2 cup Cognac <LI class=ingredient>1 (750 ml.) bottle good dry red wine such as Cote du Rhone or Pinot Noir <LI class=ingredient>1 can (2 cups) beef broth <LI class=ingredient>1 tablespoon tomato paste <LI class=ingredient>1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (1/2 teaspoon dried) <LI class=ingredient>4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature, divided <LI class=ingredient>3 tablespoons all-purpose flour <LI class=ingredient>1 pound frozen whole onions
  • 1 pound fresh mushrooms stems discarded, caps thickly sliced
For serving:
  • <LI class=ingredient>Country bread or Sour Dough, toasted or grilled and rubbed with garlic clove
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley, optional
Directions

Preheat the oven to 250 degrees F.

Heat the olive oil in a large Dutch oven. Add the bacon and cook over medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the bacon is lightly browned. Remove the bacon with a slotted spoon to a large plate.

Dry the beef cubes with paper towels and then sprinkle them with salt and pepper. In batches in single layers, sear the beef in the hot oil for 3 to 5 minutes, turning to brown on all sides. Remove the seared cubes to the plate with the bacon and continue searing until all the beef is browned. Set aside.

Toss the carrots, and onions, 1 tablespoon of salt and 2 teaspoons of pepper in the fat in the pan and cook for 10 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions are lightly browned.

Add the garlic and cook for 1 more minute. Add the Cognac, stand back, and ignite with a match to burn off the alcohol. Put the meat and bacon back into the pot with the juices. Add the bottle of wine plus enough beef broth to almost cover the meat. Add the tomato paste and thyme. Bring to a simmer, cover the pot with a tight-fitting lid and place it in the oven for about 1 1/4 hours or until the meat and vegetables are very tender when pierced with a fork.

Combine 2 tablespoons of butter and the flour with a fork and stir into the stew. Add the frozen onions. Saute the mushrooms in 2 tablespoons of butter for 10 minutes until lightly browned and then add to the stew. Bring the stew to a boil on top of the stove, then lower the heat and simmer for 15 minutes. Season to taste.

To serve, toast the bread in the toaster or oven. Rub each slice on 1 side with a cut clove of garlic. For each serving, spoon the stew over a slice of bread and sprinkle with parsley.
post #2 of 16
When the flames go out the alcohol is burned off.
There will still be traces, but for all intents and purposes, it's gone.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks Jim! I was a little concerned because when I read some of the reviews to the recipe, one person mentioned feeling like the alcohol hadn't completely burned off. Not sure what they meant by that but they tried burning the alcohol off three times.
post #4 of 16
Culinator,

As a safety precation, when adding the cognac, first remove the pan from the burner. Add the spirits, then return to the fire. That way, if there are any drips, they won't ignite in your face.

You'll also find that a torch works better than a match; again, because you can keep further away. When the fumes go up, they go up right now!
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks KYHeirloomer! I was wondering if you could use a torch or not which is exactly what I want to do. At school, we learned braising where we added wine and the way you describe it is exactly how we did it. We removed our pans and then the wine was added.
post #6 of 16
One thing to remember is that you are not burning the alcohol. You are burning a mixture of evaporating alcohol fumes and oxygen---which is an explosive mixture. So when it first ignites it does so with a whoosh!

Keep in mind, too, that how you do things in a professional kitchen are not always the way you'd do them at home.

F'rinstance, when flaming spirits in a shallow pan, a pro typically pours in the alcohol and tips the pan into the burner flame. Most people, justifyable so, would be reluctant to do it that way at home.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 16
We in the Safety is for Other People Club take your remarks with umbrage sir. Great umbrage. Not a lot of arm hair or eyebrows, but umbrage by the pot full.

Sincerely,

BDL
President of the Safety is for Other People Club
post #8 of 16
Not to mention that cute little hair lock that used to curl down your forehead. :lol:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
BDL . . . I'm thinking that might not be such a good look for me this Thanksgiving ;)

I'm going to try very hard not to burn anything, bodily hair included, haha! Besides, I'm already sporting a lovely cut through one side of my finger into the nail bed, that's lovely in and of itself. How did I do it? Forgot to use the BEAR CLAWS!
post #10 of 16
Now you've got me curious, Culinator.

Only thing I know of that uses bear claws is shredding pulled pork. Ain't nothing in there that can cause such a cut. So......what were you doing to cut yourself like that?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 16
Every home kitchen should have a fire ex. handy and a box of baking soda near or under stove.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #12 of 16
True. What every home kitchen should not have is a cook with a professional background who's flamed off thousands of pans, still flames off a lot of stuff, has become darn cavalier about the process and never removes the pan from the flame, and so on and so forth.

Right Ed?

Ed?

Ed, are you still there?

Why Ed, I do believe you're blushing.

Ed, what are you laughing at?


BDL
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
It's really kind of embarrassing. I was cutting up some midly wilted red peppers to go into my weekly beans that I make. I had my fingers totally splayed out and I cut into a bunch of strips of red pepper mistakingly thinking that my finger was a pepper if that makes sense. I had so many of them bunched up. Not that it's an excuse but I was really tired and just pushing to get my cooking done for the week. So in a nutshell, I was tired, rushing and being sloppy.

I cut into my little finger probably about 1/4 to 1/3 of the way from the tip. I remember a moment of kind of slicing, hiting a little resistance and then realizing, "Oh crap, I'm cutting my FINGER". IF I had been using the bear claw that wouldn't have happened. They always tell us to use the bear claw for EVERYTHING in school and certainly for cutting up vegetable strips.

So, there's my sad, embarrasing little tale KYHeirloomer.:rolleyes:
post #14 of 16
LOL.
A couple of months ago on a whim I brought all of the supplies for Bananas Foster to my sisters house to show her how to make the dish.
I did exactly as you described BDL, and had no problem.
I think I terrified my sister though, as she has yet to make the dish.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
Reply
post #15 of 16
It probably is kind of terrifying, Jim, for somebody who's not seen it before. Or even if they have. Friend Wife is still taken aback everytime I do it, and she's seen me flambe that way dozens of times.

Oddly enough, when I taught her how to do it it was the whole take it off the flame routine. Kind of a do as I say, not as I do thing.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #16 of 16
Best Flambe I ever saw..
In a dining room Maitre D attempting a flaming cake ceremony. For cost purposes a lot of caterers used lemon xtract(cheap) He wheeled cake into room and up to Bride and Groom with top of cake burning, The liquid spilled out ran down the cake and set the laced cake table on fire. They had to smother whole thing with a wet tablecloth. We had one or two new waiters at gig , they asked me if we did this at all weddings????
ONLY N AMERICA
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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