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Soups

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
We've decided to not use the frozen soups from Campbells on a daily basis anymore and instead make our own and the responsibility for the soups has fallen on me. I love making soup and I have lots of soup recipes to use but I would like to know.. what kinds of soups do you suggest I try? I'm going to start doing a weekly soup menu up so that I can make sure we have the ingredients on hand and if there is something I need like ground beef or fresh chicken legs I will know in advance that I have to pick those up on my way to work.

I'm looking forward to your suggestions!!
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post #2 of 13
Make a two week rotating soup menu. Keep in mind seasons of yearm heavier in colder monthes, lighter in warmer. Campbells is pure sodium and food starch. Use soup stocks if you can. Good Luck
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post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks, Ed!

One thing you forgot to mention about the Campbells... the cost!! It is super expensive compared to what we pay for making our soups ourselves.
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post #4 of 13
Question: Do you finish off a soup when first made?

In our case (and we have soup almost every day) that isn't the case. So we freeze it in portion-sized zipper bags. Always have some handy, that way---at least as convenient as a can, but much better quality.

We also can soups. You'll need a pressure canner for that, most of the time. But it's so easy to just open a jar and reheat it.

If you opt for freezing or canning, a couple of things to keep in mind:

1. Grains should not be included. That is, rice, noodles, etc. They tend to go real mushy. Instead, make the balance of the soup and add the grain at serving time. F'rinstance, if you want a chicken & rice soup, make it without the rice. Then add cooked rice when you reheat it.

2. Dairy products should never be canned. And, when frozen, tend to break when defrosted. So either skip those for long-term storage, or find a substitute. Soy milk, for instance, works OK. Not as smooth and creamy, of course, but not bad.

3. When freezing, squeeze out all the air. Then lay the bag flat, so the contents are as thin as possible. They freeze faster that way, and quality often improves.

Given the time of year, I'd think in terms of hearty soups: beef and veggie, for instance.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 13
There are many quick asian soups. The Vietnamese often serve the same meal wet or dry. Meaning you'll get the noodles, meat and vegie garnishes on the plate with some nuoc cham dipping sauce, or you can have the same ingredients in a broth like a soup. Quick to make, mixes up the variety and a good way to use up leftovers.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 13
One big thing for a really good soup is fresh broth and stock. Just ask your meat packer for chicken/turkey carcasses, and beef bones. Long bones and ribs are good, as they are full of marrow and marrow makes for soupy goodness.
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post #7 of 13
Campbell's? In a professional kitchen? Yuk!
post #8 of 13
Ditto all the above.

My top 5 list:

1. Cream of Pumpkin
2. Leek & potato
3. Minestrone
4. Creamy Tomato
5. Country Veg

All could be done with either veg/chicken stock. A good stock is your best starting place, with beef stock where appropriate.

Oh no, look out, more good ones coming to mind....
6. Chicken & corn
7. French onion
8. Pea & Ham
9. Chicken broth with chicken forcemeat balls
10. Hot Sour soup
11. Scotch broth
12. Roasted tomato and roasted capsicum
13. Cream of Mushroom
....the list is endless!

Make sure your garnishes reflect what ingredients are in the soup where possible, and compliment the soup, match the flavours etc. With mushroom soup for example, reserve some thin slices of mushroom. If its a white/red/orange soup, snipped garlic chives go well. Minestrone, well, its clear you have to go with nice chunks of garlic bread :)

Can use garlic croutons, finely chopped parsley, grated lemon/lime/orange rind,deep fried sliced shallots (drained well), green onion tops sliced on the angle, where you need more colour- a sprinkle of paprika.

Sour cream or greek yoghurt or cream is a great accompaniment for many soups, swirled thru to make a pretty effect.

Hmmm...thinking about making stock for soup now..... :D
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 13
My favorite go to soup is a white bean Tuscan style soup or a hearty minestrone. Cozy on a cold day.
post #10 of 13
Ham and bean soup, mashed potato-leek soup,yum.

My favorite so far is my version of Portuguese caldo verde (I've never had the real thing), and, well, maybe about 20 others.
post #11 of 13
You don't say what kind of place you are at. Are there leftovers you can make use of? If you have more than one kind per day, one should be clear and one should be cream base. The two week list would be a very useful tool for you as it helps you keep in mind what soups you normally make. Allow some wiggle room to take advantage of vendor specials and any leftovers you might be able to use. One of my most popular soups is a Jamaican cabbage one. It's chicken broth with shredded cabbage, slice Polish sausage, green pepper or pimentoes, and some tomatoes. Black pepper, garlic and cayenne pepper plus the usual mire poix. Easy, inexpensive to make and people love it. Potato soup, with or without cheese is always popular and corn chowder. That's coming up on my rotation next week. I usually put bacon in it, but one of the line cooks has been begging me to make it with breakfast sausage like his dad does, so I'm going to try it.
post #12 of 13
Thread Starter 
Ooops sorry about that.. I work at a breakfast and lunch place. We only offer lunch items m-f. The chain has a huge fresh fruit focus, but we also get in veggies. We get IQF spinach and asparagus and the usual suspects for fresh produce. I can pick up meats from the farmers' market and if we need to get any extra vegetables we can easily get them in. I was looking at the cost of some of the premade soups today and I couldn't belive how crazy expensive they are. Thai chicken chowder is definitely on the menu for Monday! I LOVE that soup and it sold like hotcakes at the last place I worked at. It's chicken broth, diced cooked chicken, green peppers, mushrooms, onion, garlic, basil, 1 can of coconut milk, dried basil (regular or thai), thai red curry paste to taste, a little tomato juice for colour (I eyeball it) and basmati rice. Your Jamaican soup sounds wonderful.. can I borrow that please?
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post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
I forgot to mention red peppers in the thai soup!
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