ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Is there a say to take the saltiness out of salami?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Is there a say to take the saltiness out of salami?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Is there a way to take the saltiness out of salami? (besides making my own)

TIA
post #2 of 19
why would you want to do such a blasphemous thing?

eta have you tried oldani genoa salami? it seems less salty to me than most.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Some dishes where I use thick sliced grilled salami are too salty.
post #4 of 19
the only way i can think of, other than looking for reduced sodium salami, would be to soak it in water. that will also probably reduce the flavor too.
post #5 of 19
If you make your own you will probably hurt someone, as you do not have excess to nitrates and nitrites and other preservatives required to do it correctly. If you are grilling then you can soak in H20 first then dry and grill.:lol:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #6 of 19
As a matter of fact, all of the preservatives and salts necessary are available from sausage supply houses that cater to home cooks.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #7 of 19
You could always try ordering from Salumi. It's not the cheapest but it's killer stuff.


I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
Reply
post #8 of 19
Have you tried salami from different makers? The flavor, texture and oils can differ greatly in certain brands.

I can't help but think a dry cacciatore sausage. It goes really nice in dishes and holds up to heavy cooking better than a reular salami. If I was using salami as a topper I would just try cutting thinner strips and letting the other flavors of the dish take over. But if your using thicker chunks...the cacciatore sausage may work better.

There are certainly plenty of other choices out there too...try some and let us know what you find.

dan

(edit add: What's the recipe your using?)
post #9 of 19
Maybe a pinch of sugar to balance out the saltiness? This may be pure nonsense but perhaps worth a try...just a pinch though. Depends if it would work with the other ingredients.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #10 of 19
i don't think sugar will work. sugar to balance salt is usually a trick for things like sauce/soup/etc. salami is pretty dense i don't think the sugar will penetrate it, so you'll just end up with sugary salty salami.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
I think she meant before stuffing the meat mixture into the colagen.
post #12 of 19
if he's making the salami himself then i think the solution is don't put as much salt in it.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
EB was saying it wouldn't cure right with less salt.
post #14 of 19
aren't you the sausage king of chicago?
post #15 of 19
I did actually mean what Damian said...:blush:

I'd just go and try another brand, keep trying till you find one that suits. If nothing else, you'll have a great collection of salamis. Yum!
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
post #16 of 19
Geeze,

Just go to an eastern European market with a good deli counter and you'll find scores of choices for salami alone. They'll cut you a slice of each until you find one you like.

That said, it's a brave new world to have [so many sausages] in it. You're best answer may be to use something other than salami -- all of which tend to be salty to some degree.

BDL
post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Actually I was trying to stay with beef salami, and specially Kosher beef salami, so the choices are a little less limited, I check out a few of the delis near by though and see what they have.
post #18 of 19
Abe,

The problem is not with the salami, it's all about serving temperature. Salami is meant to be eaten at room temp or slightly cooler, thus the higher salt content -typically 2.5% of the weight before drying, -sausage, intended to be eaten hot, is usually 1.5 to 1.8% salt - cold temperature suppresses salt and sugars on your palate.

My suggestion: make some salami cotto,: its the same process as a salami or sausage, but instead of dry curing it, you poach it -A.K.A. "summer sausage" -you can completely control your salt content (i'd shoot for about 1.6% of weight) and if you want that "pink" color, use some "cure #1" One gram per pound is a good rule (.004%or 136ppm) -you can get everything you need from Sausagemaker.com

Curing salts (nitrites and nitrates) are not a thing for guess work or "eyeballing" it. It is serious business! Do your research! For more info check out Len Poli's sausage making website -it has more information than any book on the shelf today!

I've been doing charcuterie seriously for about 5 years now, and have had my share of bad results, "winging it" is not recommended.

-Ciao
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
post #19 of 19
You can buy Hebrew National brand almost all over the world. The only thing is once it is sliced in the store it is no longer Kosher. Publix Supermarket is not Kosher. This will not change the salt content or taste:lol:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Is there a say to take the saltiness out of salami?