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Top Sirloin?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Is there any classic preparation associated with Top Sirloin?
post #2 of 29
Roast or steak? Roast can be smoked or baked to med rare, thin sliced and piled on sandwiches. Steak you can treat like most other steaks. I wouldn't take it past medium though or it can get tough.
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well either. I was just wondering since we have like Tournedos Rossinni or Steak Diane maybe we have a preparation that specifically requires top sirloin.
post #4 of 29
I guess I'd call it the classic shish kabob meat, is for us anyway. Also good ground w/chuck for burgers.
post #5 of 29
Don't know of any specific other then roast sirloin of beef, which after cooking can be used for multitude of things ie.French Dip. RB Reuben etc. The two you mentioned are specific to their cuts of meat.
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post #6 of 29
The famed "Santa Maria" aka "California Beef" Barbeque uses either top sirloin or tri tip. In fact, the Santa Maria Elk's Club which got (false) credit for originating the style/method used (and still uses) only top. So, you might say top is the classic, and tri the interloper.

Done in the "classic" way, the meat is simply seasoned and cooked open-pit style over a hot live oak fire -- either threaded on to rods ("classic" ) or sitting on a grate ("nouveau").

Assuming you don't have a central-coastal-valley style pit with a height adjustable rack sitting over a pan big enough for a big, live fire, you can use any large grill with a lot of adjustment range and a cover, or even a Weber kettle -- with varying degrees of authenticity and quality of results.

If you're interested in the history of the misattribution of the creation of "Santa Maria" Barbecue, and/or the "invention" of the tri-tip, let's talk further.

BDL
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post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
I assume that's a roast then? And nope, don't have a central-coastal-valley style pit with a height adjustable rack sitting over a pan big enough for a big, live fire. ;)

It's interesting in a way only food nerds might find interesting.
post #8 of 29
I roast it at low temperature (325F, maybe) after seasoning it really well. I let it rest and slice it very thinly. I store it (and its juices) overnight, then put the meat and juices in a crock pot with beef stock and more herbs and garlic. I cook it on low for 3-4 hours and serve it as a hot Italian beef sandwich.

Serve it on a chewy Italian roll (from Paielli's Bakery, if you you're lucky! :D).

I learned to do this from friends when I lived in a heavily Italian community.
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post #9 of 29
I can see doing that with bottom sirloin, or various parts of the chuck or round; but top sirloin is awfully expensive to cook that way. That said, it must be wonderful.

BDL
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post #10 of 29
I can buy top sirloin for less than chuck.
post #11 of 29
it doesn't matter how you cook the sirloin. What's important to know is that this cut of meat isn't a well-used muscle, therefore contains little or no connective tissue that needs to be cooked out.
What that means is that the longer you cook it, the more moisture you're losing and the tougher it becomes (no matter how slow or fast you cook it), so the only thing you need to know is that this cut should not exceed 60 degrees (medium rare) if you want to maintain flavour, texture and moisture, use a thermometer and cook it how you like.
post #12 of 29
Italian beef. I haven't done any for a while, maybe for sunday's dinner. If memory serves me right, rump roast is often the cut of choice for this, not top sirloin. We'll see what looks good at the market.

mjb.
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post #13 of 29
Thread Starter 
BTW I just remembered eating this cut at Fogo de Chao. You folks heard of rump cover?

Rump cover - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
post #14 of 29
One for all you trivia fans. you have loin of lamb and pork story goes Henry viii favorite cut of beef was loin so he knighted the joint hence Sir loin.
Any classic recipe for Entrecote or faux fillet. Bordalaise , Marchand du vin, poivre vert jump out but there are many, many more.
Steve
post #15 of 29
I do on ocaasion relate this tale, but truth be told I would say 'sirloin' has more to do with French, with 'sur' meaning above. The cut does indeed come from the top of the cow. But then again, wouldn't we also have sous loin instead of bottom round?

mjb.
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post #16 of 29
What about Beef Round Sirloin Tip. Would it be a great Idea? Hmm.. Or maybe Tri-tip cut If you like. :) Good luck to you.
post #17 of 29
As I pointed out the French have two names for cut from tthe sirloin, entrecote [between the bone] and faux filet [false fillet] they do not use the word loin so whilst my idea of Henry viii may or maynot be true the idea of surloin as no chance of being true. Just for the record sur means on, as in oeuf sur le plate [egg on a dish] and sous means under as in sous chef.
There may of course be a differences in the cut between England and America. In these days of flowery menu writing it would not suprise me if people were not using the word completely out of context but that could be a thread of it own.
Steve
post #18 of 29
The rump cover or top sirloin cap (184D) is what is taken off the top of the top sirloin butt.
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post #19 of 29
Modern French may be as it may be, but the OED as well as every other responsible etymological source I could find on the net, cites the origin of the term "sirloin," as the ME (middle English) "surloine," which in turn was derived from the OF (old French) "surlonge," which itself was a contraction of "sur la longe."

Whether or not King Henry VIII ever knighted a sirloin, and whether or not that changed the spelling to "sir..." may also be as it may be; but I might as well point out that if any of the English Kings who were supposed to have done it did it, it must have been Henry who either coined the joke or gave it the royal stamp, as the term was current by the middle/late 16th Century at the latest -- to the extent that English spelling was standardized at all then. Also (wait for it), English spelling was not really standardized then. It was something of a free-for-all.

On a related note: If other people are interested in modern French names for beef cuts, they might want to look at: Bœuf

BDL
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post #20 of 29
Thread Starter 
That's standard American? I had no idea. Hmm...

I guess over here in America Sirloin, and even Top Sirloin is relegated to mass steakhouses. Seems like "finer" restaurants serve only Filet, Ribeye, Strip, and other trendy cuts. Top Sirloin is a wonderfully tender cut and much more affordable than those other more pedigreed cuts.
post #21 of 29
The numbers I post are standard numbers for American beef. Any Chef in the USA should be able to order from a meat purveyor with that number. Setting aside the sirloin strip many high end steak houses in the US serve a sirloin.
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post #22 of 29
I dunno if you could call it a classic, but I love Prudhomme's roasted sirloin. You cut deep incisions across the grain and stuff with heavily carmelized mirepoix, then crust with cajun seasoning and roast. Very tasty.

With the price of tenderloin being so high I see a lot of Steak Au Poivre made with sirloin around here, fwiw.
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #23 of 29
[QUOTE=boar_d_laze;283912]Modern French may be as it may be, but the OED as well as every other responsible etymological source I could find on the net, cites the origin of the term "sirloin," as the ME (middle English) "surloine," which in turn was derived from the OF (old French) "surlonge," which itself was a contraction of "sur la longe."

The original question posted by Kuan was ' Is there any classic preperations for top sirloin' my responce was to that question and I added a bit of trivia for the interest of other readers.
This was not a question of spelling but origin.
If you read the recipe below for Beef Royal taken from the Lady Hannah Glasse book, The art of cookery published in 1747 [A book by the way is how us old folk find out information] you will see that she does indeed refer to the cut as Surloin of beef however at no point throughout the book does does she refer to a loin of Venison, veal, lamb or pork as a surloin.
I subscibe to the theory that 'just because its not on the internet does not mean it did not happen and just because its on the internet does not mean its true'.
steve
post #24 of 29
As promised recipe from the Lady hanah book of 1747.
Beef Royal
Take a surloin of beef, or large rump, bone it and beat it very well, then lard it with bacon, feafon it with salt, pepper, mace,cloves and nutmeg, all beat fine, fome lemon-peel cut fmall and fome sweet herbs. in the mean time make ftrong broth of the bones, take a piece of butter with a little flower brown it, put in the beef, keep it turning often till it is brown, then ftrain the broth, put all together into a pot, put in bay-leaf, a few truffles, and some ox palates cut fmall. cover it clofe, and let it ftew till it is tender, take out the beef, skim off all the fat, pour in a pint of claret, fome fryd oyfters, an anchovy and fome gerkins fhred fmall. boil altogether put in the beef to warm, thicken your sauce with a piece of butter rolled in flour, or mushroom powder, or burnt butter. Lay you meat in a difh pour sauce over it and fend it to table. This may be eat hot or cold.
This is copied from the recipe so please do not write in with spellig corrections or to tell me my keyboard as a fault with f for s
Steve
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post #25 of 29
Hey Kuan! Looks like you definitely got more answer than you bargained for here.:look:

I'm not sure about how far back you consider classic but if you want to go steakhouse classic...........:rolleyes:

Black and Blue Baseball cut baby!!!!!!!!!! Maybe a side of a bleu vein mold cheese (sauce or crumbles but I prefer the crumbles :cool: ), a couple monkey dishes filled with some fettuccine Alfredo, Broccoli almondine and or creamed spinach.............Now that's classic! ;)
post #26 of 29
Thread Starter 
post #27 of 29
Top sirloins like yours are carried by all Costco's AFAIK. $2.50# for choice here and $4.99 for prime when they have it. No need to tie them. I grill them often. They have a nice flavor.
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
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post #28 of 29
Thread Starter 
Well mine looked like it wanted to be tied. The two sections seem like they wanted to separate.
post #29 of 29
I do get those pieces in the Costco packs as well. Unfortunately the texture is very different on the piece that wants to separate and it's not connected by any thing other than fat. Tying doesn't do a lot for it IMO, not that tying hurts any, although it might slow you down a bit pan roasting. What I like about thick Top Sirloins is that I can turn off the BGE after I sear them. They absorb plenty of smoke as they rest. While not as tender as some other steaks they have a great flavor.
So others have a better idea of what we are talking about here is a shot of a Sirloin similar to yours before it was cooked.


I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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