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Rolling Pins and Pie Dough

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
My husband handed me a marble rolling pin that he's had for years. Says he's used it many times, but my experience is that everything sticks to it, no matter how much flour I use. Pie dough in particular is a problem. I'm thinking the smooth surface is the culprit. Even the best quality wood pins have some texture to them and this would hold the flour and prevent sticking. Am I right? Should I toss the marble and risk hurting his feelings or am I doing something wrong?
post #2 of 7
A marble pin is meant to be used chilled. Chill the pin in the refrigerator for a couple of hours, flour as you described; and make sure there's adequate bench flour on the board beneath the dough, and on top of the dough as well. It should work then if it hasn't lost its polish.

More generally, if you don't like it, don't use it. The rolling pin is one of those great many pieces of equipment where personal 'druthers control absolutely. The best pin is the one you like the most. I like a French pin (plain wood cylinder), but my affection doesn't make it better than a ball-bearing, a taper, a silicone, an aluminum, or any other material or design. It's better for me because it rewards good technique and punishes bad -- could be awful for you.

If it's your husband's favorite pin, keep it for him and use whatever you like. I'm a husband, you can trust me.

BDL
post #3 of 7
Solid advice on the husband's favorite pin issue. If my wife liked to use an aluminum pin(neither of us are fond of them, BTW), I would soldier on using my trusty oak taper and let her roll away in contentment with her printing press roller.;)
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #4 of 7
I used to have a marble rolling pin, but did not enjoy using it. I found it was just too heavy for me. It finally met its end when I let it roll off the counter and crash to the floor. (good riddance) I have my mother's rolling pin in safe keeping, and an oak one that HubbyDearest made for me on his lathe. But my favorite is a copper cylinder with wooden handle. It's comfortable in my hands and has a nice heft. My opinion is that the best rolling pin is the one you personally enjoy using. Hey...would you go out in hubby's shop and try to tell him which hammer to use? :look:
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #5 of 7
Speaking of preferences, mine is the piece of pvc pipe my father gave me back in the 60s or 70s (pvc water pipes had just come in, i think, and he had built our house from scratch including plumbing and was redoing some of the plumbing at the time). He smoothed off the sharp corners at each end and it is the perfect size and weight, and I can even put it in the dishwasher. It's just under 2 inches in diameter. I don;t know, maybe another type would have been better, but the one my mother had was wood and thinner, and so between the two i preferred this, and have never really used any other. Brought it among my most precious objects over to Italy. I guess I was imprinted on it. But once you get used to something, you get to like it or hate it I guess.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #6 of 7
Thread Starter 
Good points all. I didn't know that marble was supposed to be chilled so I'll try that. If not successful, I see a lovely wood pin in my future :). Thanks!
post #7 of 7
One very inexpensive thing might help -- a rolling pin sleeve (cover, sock, stocking, stockinette, etc.) of loose cotton fabric to hold flour on. They can be had alone or with a board cover of the same stuff.

... But if you'd rather get a nice new wooden pin, you didn't read that. O_:-} It never hurts to have different kinds of rolling pins for different kinds of tasks. What works great for pasta probably isn't so good for sugar cookies.
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