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Pork Loin or Pork Chops?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yall were so helpful last time, i'm back for more discussion! Catering next week for 350, making a Balsamic Barbequed (Really slow cooked in a zesty Tomato sauce) Pork and Chicken. Chicken I just use boneless breasts cut up, but this is the largest number of people I've done the pork for. When making it for a smaller number I just use pork chops--sear to get some carmelization, and then cook for 2 hours in the sauce in the oven at about 325, til it's super tender.

My question is, when doing this large of a number, what's going to be the most economical and simplest way to do this? Should i do what i normally do and sear 350 pork chops, or should i do whole pork loins, sear, roast til rare and then cook in the sauce? Or another option, just for $$$ should i buy pork loin and cut into my own chops?

Your opinions please!!!
post #2 of 10
what's the price difference?
bone in or out loin?

I'm not clear.....you aren't mixing pork and chicken in sauce?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 10
Same questions shroom offered.

Usually, it's cheaper to buy packer (in the plastic bag from the slaughterer), boneless loins and "steak" them (cut chops) yourself then buying boneless chops. The butchering is very easy.

All you need is a very sharp slicing knife. A slicing knife because the wide profile of a chef's knife will stick in the cut and make you nuts; and anything too short will force you to do so much sawing your cuts will be ragged. If you can't do a good job of sharpening yourself, you're going to want someone to do it for you.

Other than a well sharpened knife, you don't need a whole lot of skill going in. You'll have had plenty of practice by the time you're done cutting enough pork for 350 covers. Cut your chops consistently portioned, thin, and square to the board -- no bias. Keep your knife sharp as you go. Take your time (which ironically makes you faster) and make each slice right. You'll do fine.

The experience of cutting so many thin chops will serve you in good stead when tackling future projects. You will forever know how to make a straight cut in meat -- something a great many people can't do.

BDL
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Ex owner/operator Predominantly French catering; ex cook at a couple of decent joints
post #4 of 10
personally i would go with boneless centercut pork loin......pork is dirt cheap right now, thanks to h1n1, and no messing around with the bones. it sounds like you will be cutting it up anyway....
post #5 of 10
Adding to what BDL says---which I agree with 100%: If you're not experienced cutting whole loins into "chops", actually use a ruler on the first one. Measure the thickness of the chops you want, and score the loin along the top. The cut as BDL directed.

After the first one, your sense-memory should take over, and you'll be amazed at how similar each slice is.

One question, though: Why are you using loins to make barbeque? That certainly wouldn't be my first choice.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
i haven't actually priced it all out--will do that tommorow with my sales rep--guess that's important info. To answer other questions, no, not cooking together--just offering both the chicken and pork option cooked in the same kind of sauce. and also, not ACTUALLY barbequed, just a very tender slow cooked chop. (Recipe name is a misnomer i agree). Thanks for the slicing advice!
post #7 of 10
Both are good options, and as BDL points out the same loins can be cut for chops or roasted whole. Even before H1N1 pork loin was regularly on sale for $1.69/lb at my local Sam's Club- that's pretty cheap. Both chops and whole loins have their advantages. When cut to chops you can mark them on the broiler, giving them some color and "steakish" quality. I'll often wrap them in bacon for a little extra flavor. Roasted whole the loin is very versatile, lots of things you can do with them.
"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #8 of 10
I usually perfer boneless pork loin...they are very cheap and dirty right now.
post #9 of 10
I use loins , I bone them and then let them get a little hard in freezer then run on electric meat slicer. If you leave bone in, you are governed as to how thick to cut them. Bone out you can cut any thickness you want.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #10 of 10

buy boneless pork loin

:rolleyes: Buying whole pork loin for 350 is a bit much even if you have a band saw.
You can get a better price on the boneless pork loin because they sell the back ribs of the loin for more than than the whole loin. The same as they did the chicken wings are more expensive than the whole chicken breast.(Food for thought, 30 years ago I bought chicken wings and necks for Blue Crab bait for 10 cents a pound):thumb:
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