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Static Plate Competition

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
Each year the Universitity of Cambridges' 31 colleges compete in a live cook-off competition and a static plated competition. Each college is an independent institution with its own property and income, as a result we have 31 catering departments competing against each other.
This year my kitchen has 19 entries into the plated comp. The chefs have to present a starter, main or dessert, the food is displayed cold and with appropriate glaze-the food is not tasted, but judged on presentation. I've heard of chefs using wood varnish to glaze cuts of meat, marzipan to represent sorbet or ice cream.

I'm sure there are many chefs here who has competed in similar events and I'm after as much advice as I can get; particularly helpful would be advice on glazing and getting the brightest presentation from the food. I personally have only competed in live events where food is tasted, so this is all new to me.

Thanks in advance for your help!:thumb:
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
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UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
Reply
post #2 of 6
Thread Starter 
Have I not described this very well?
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
Reply
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
Reply
post #3 of 6
A few ideas you might already have, the wood stain seems to be popular, especially for chops or ribs. You might also check on the WEB for a store called "Trengove" , it is a special effects store where all the food sylists go to get there stuff or get ideas, like steam , ice, etc....

My research and from what I have seen...for special effects:

1- Half-coooked meats are painted with wood stain for a glossy, extra juicy look.

2- Glycerin , mixed 50/50 in an atomizer for a shiny look or for droplets use a syringe, it will not evaporate.

3-Blanching green vegetables to just bring up their bright color, rather than cooking them completely.

4- Making a mixture of solid shortening, corn syrup, and powdered sugar (essentially a very stiff frosting) that can be scooped to simulate real ice cream or...

5- Mashed potatoes (with food coloring) to simulate ice cream.

6- To stabilize delicate food, use toothpicks, straight pins , or hair pins to hold things in place.

7- Gelatin or food starches can be used to keep sauces in place or a slice of pie from tipping over.

8- Spray Deodorant to make fruits break into a "cold sweat" and gives a frosty sheen.

9- Hairspray , keeps cakes looking fresh and moist.

10- The grilled look: Grill marks are branded onto the surface using red-hot skewers.

just a bit of info.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #4 of 6
pembroke, it's late here but I have some thoughts to share.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 6
Glazing was usually achieved by gelatin, obscene amounts, something like 25 leaves to a liter of water. It dries brilliant glossy and rock hard. You dip every thing in this (including salad leaves adn indiviudal julliene) impaled on a toothpick and stick the toothpick onto a piece of styrofaom. Drips can be melted off by proping a clean frying pan at an angle and putting a can of sterno under it, gently bring the dipped item to the angled surface of the pan and melt the drip off.

Glazing can only be done 8-12 hrs prior to the judging, as the food will spoil and degenerate

Back ups of everything

Sulphered potatoes, cauliflower, etc. stay white...

"Old school" was to put a thin layer of aspic/clear gelatin on every plating surface. It gives the items on the plate a bit of height, but also helps "glue" the stuff down so it doesn't shift when transporting

Shaving cream holds up rather nicely as compared to real whipping cream....


Airbrushes for applying colour and "fade"

light dusting of sugar and a blow torch on pastry items for a nice "golden brown" effect, as well as for on bones of meat items.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #6 of 6

Comps

Well I've done a few comps... chef of the year etc etc

Never put wood stain on food,
Never put toothpicks in things etc

wanna see more of my work?? look me up on facebook

culinart@gmail.com
:peace:

or look up staranise.co.nz

Think you might enjoy what ya se
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