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Artichoke Soup

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
I had a cream of artichoke soup yesterday at a highly rated local diner. I didn't quite know what to expect. What I got was a smooth creamy soup, quite mild and thick with the gray green color of artichoke. Buttery and rich, it had a little of that artichoke acidity at first but that quickly faded.

It was pleasant but I think the artichoke deserves better in a soup. After thinking about it a bit, my first ideas are basically an avgolemono with artichokes instead of chicken and stronger aromatics.

Any other experiences or ideas with artichoke soup.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #2 of 15
Do you mean artichoke broth instead of chicken broth? I'm interested in how this turns out. Mint might be the herb of choice here.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 15
You're better pureeing some well-cooked artichoke hearts in chicken or vegetable stock and adding a little cream to it than making a pure artichoke stock -- but that's an opinion you can test by steaming a couple of artichokes in the usual way and tasting the resulting stock.

If you want to intensify the artichoke taste, add the artichoke trimmings (leaves, stem peelings, etc., but not the choke) to the broth and cook them slightly, before cooking the hearts (in or out of the broth) and moving through the rest of the sequence. If you fortify the broth with stock and cook the hearts separately, you'll gain a lot of control over the situatoin.

You can intensify the color by pureeing a small amount of parsley along with the artichoke.

I'm not immediately seduced by the rice and egg, nor by the lack of chicken in your variation of avgolemeno soup. But don't let my innate conservatism slow you down. Plus, there are all kinds of wonderful things you can do with lemon juice and/or lemon zest.

Artichoke hearts are killer on pizza. Artichokes may be blanched, split and grilled. Artichokes may be smoked to great effect. Deep fried artichoke hearts -- especially "tempura" style make beer very happy. Etc.

BDL
post #4 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'd probably just stick with chicken stock.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 15
I enjoy artichokes raw the most. Slice the hearts, drizzle with lemon juice and salt. A perfect accompaniment while sipping ouzo.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #6 of 15

Smoked Artichokes?

BDL--

We've smoked a number of vegetables for various uses and to varying degrees of success (our smoked eggplant puree is one of our favorites--as a dip, a pizza topping or a pasta sauce), but I've never thought or heard of smoking artichokes.

Can you provide further details?

JonK
post #7 of 15
Trim the stems, as necessary. Trim the points if you care to do so.

Parcook the artichokes until about halfway done, by steaming.

Remove the artichokes from the pot, and shock them. If you're planning on serving the artichokes as a side, and haven't trimmed them all the way down, cut them in half lengthwise, and remove the choke. If you're planning on ultimately pureeing the artichokes or serving as heart and stem chunks (salads, dips), "turn" the artichoke to remove everything inedible.

Either way, you may hold them in the refrigerator for up to several days.

Place the halved or turned artichokes in the smoker and smoke for about half an hour. Mesquite, oak, citrus, alder, grape cuttings, citrus -- best. Other fruitwoods, pecan, maple, very good. Hickory -- not a great choice, it's sweetness tends to make the artichoke taste weird.

Once they've taken on some smoke, finish cooking the halved artichokes to slightly charred limpness on the grill. Depending on the size of the artichokes and the smoker temperature, that probably won't take long at all. Serve as an "upscale barbecue" app or side, along with lemon, balsamic, aioli, or seasoned butter. However you sauce, think about working in some garlic.

As for the turned, smoked artichokes. Chunk and use for an artichoke/spinach dip, an omeletter, etc. Or, puree and use for a soup.

If you haven't tried smoked artichoke hearts fried in a parmesan tempura batter, well I just don't know what.

Many wines do not pair well with artichokes, which tends to make big reds especially taste sweet -- and not in the good way. Spicy whites like dry traminers do OK. Fumes too. Sangria, a definite yes. Some cocktails, like mojitos if they're not too sweet. Anything citrussy, ditto. Beer is probably A Number One, if the situation allows.

BDL
post #8 of 15

Smoked Artichokes

BDL--

Thank you for the detailed information. Though it is pretty much the end of grilling and smoking season here in the Northeast, I'll try to work that in before the flakes fall in earnest. We really like arties around our house. In any case, your words will go into my recipe file.

And, yes, I agree there is something in artichokes (I recall hearing about a polysaccharide) that makes wine taste strange.

JonK
post #9 of 15
Hi!!!

I have never been heard of artichoke soup. Can you tell me the taste of this soup ?
Is it really tasty? From where i can get to taste this taste?

Neha Sood
Food Reviewer
post #10 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'd never heard of it before either. I had it at the Left Fork Grill here in Salt Lake City if you want to come try it. It was a special so I can't say when it might appear again.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 15
Hi Phatch,

I feel really glad of getting a prompt response from your side.
Thanks so much....So nice of you.
Where Salt Lake City exactly located?
Is there any special occasion on which it is specially available?
I want one more favor form your side, if you can. Pls inform whenever you find it anywhere again.

Thanks again..

Neha Sood
Food Reviewer
post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 
Salt Lake City is the capital city of the state of Utah in the United States of America.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 15
blond roux, onions, dillweed then chopped canned artichokes, chicken stock, lemon zest, squeeze of lemons, sometimes a pinch of cayene or chipotle or smoked paprika..... emersion hand blender......yum.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Sounds good. Hits a lot of the flavor notes of the avgolemono. Hadn't thought of dillweed or the smoked paprika. Both nice touches. I know I want some garlic too.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #15 of 15
Yea I like that recipe too, may have to try it.

OT - what's the difference between dill weed and dill?

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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