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Duck with Olives in the Spanish Style

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Domesticated duck is a vexatious challenge in that half the duck, the breasts, are best cooked to rare over high heat, and the legs and thighs are best when cooked low and slow, as in a confit. It's not what most Americans think of for duck, but braising works for the whole bird.


I’m calling this recipe “Spanish,” but that might be unfairly nationalistic and exclusive. You can find this sort of thing all over the Mediterranean and might just as fairly call it “Provencal,” attribute it to the Italians, or spin it with a little mint, serve it with flat bread and call it Moroccan. Speaking of Spanish – if you don’t have sherry, get some. Wait, that didn’t come out right. If you’d prefer to use dry Madeira, dry Marsala, or anything else “off-dry,” go right ahead.


PATO OLIVO ESPANOL
Duck with Olives in the Spanish Style
(Serves 4 as a main course)


Ingredients:
1 whole duck
Flour
Extra virgin olive oil
1 large or 2 medium Spanish onions
Large cloves from 1 head of garlic, about 1 doz, peeled
1 medium carrot
1 rib celery
1/2 bottle dry, white wine
1 cup dry sherry (Manzanilla or Amontillado)
1 cup green olives
4 tbs orange marmalade
1 cup chicken stock
1 handful oil cured, black olives
1 handful parsley
1 oz Serrano ham, or you may substitute Prosciutto.

Technique:
Start by breaking your duck into 8 serving and 6 flavoring pieces as follows:

1. Disjoint the wings at the first joint where the upper arm attaches to the lower. Leave the lower arm and wing tip as a single piece, and reserve them. Leave the upper arm attached to the breast.

2. Remove both leg and thigh quarters from the body, then disjoint them into separate pieces.

3. Remove the breasts from the body by running a knife carefully between meat and ribs, and cutting around the wishbone, etc. Finally disjoint the upper arm from the carcass so the arm stays with the breast, and the otherwise boneless breast can be taken from the carcass.

4. Cut each breast into two pieces of roughly equal size.

5. Using a very heavy knife (chef de chef) or cleaver, break the carcass into 4 pieces.

Preheat the oven to 350.



Dredge the breast pieces, legs and thighs in flour, heavily seasoned with salt, pepper and paprika.

Put the casserole on a medium high fire to preheat. When the casserole is hot, add about 1/4 cup of olive oil after the in it. When the oil shimmers, just before it smokes, add half of the duck pieces and brown them. When they're browned, remove and reserve them. Add the remaining meat pieces and do the same. Finally, brown the wing tips and carcass pieces.

Meanwhile, while the duck is browning turn your onion, carrot, and celery into mirepoix.

When all the duck is browned and fragrant, remove it from the casserole, and add the mirepoix. Cook until browned. Reduce the heat slightly, add 3 tbs of flour, stirring, until the "raw" is cooked off ‑‑ about 3 minutes. You'll smell the difference as the flour toasts.

Add the sherry, wine, green olives and 2 tbs of orange marmalade. Bring to the boil. Return the duck pieces to the casserole, cover it, and put in the oven for 45 minutes.

After 45 minutes, remove from oven and set on the stove. Remove the duck pieces and discard the carcass and wing tips. Check to see that the meaty pieces are tender. If not, cover the casserole and return it to the oven for another 15 minutes. When they are tender, reserve the meaty pieces on a covered, heated dish; and set aside. Pick out the green olives and set them aside as well.

Let the casserole cool for a minute, allowing the fat to rise to the top. Meanwhile, chop the parsley.

Skim off as much fat as possible from the casserole. Turn on the flame under the sauce, and return to the boil. Thin to the desired consistency (nappe a metal spoon) with the chicken stock. Strain the sauce through a fine sieve or Chinese hat, forcing as much garlic and mirepoix through as possible into your sauce pan. Add the reserved 2 tbs of marmalade and whisk it into the sauce. When the marmalade is incorporated, taste for seasoning and adjust if necessary. Remove from heat. Add the reserved green olives, the black olives, the minced ham, and half the parsley.

Plate the duck and sauce it generously. Garnish the plates with enough of the remaining chopped parsley for a fresh appearance.

BDL

PS. This recipe is original with me. If you like it and want to share it (but not for gain) with someone else, you have my permission on condition you attribute it to me, Boar D. Laze. I would consider it a kindness if you would also mention my eventually to be finished book, COOK FOOD GOOD, American Cooking and Technique for Beginners and Intermediates.

PPS. If you haven't done so recently, take a look at my blog on CT, ChefTalk Cooking Forums - COOK FOOD GOOD, Blogging BDL's Cookbook. Suggestions welcome.

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post #2 of 12
What kind of green olives are you using? Manzaninilla, Arbequina or some thing not Spanish like a Cerignola? Isn't there a Spanish black olive cured in Sherry?
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 
The last time I made this, which was last spring or winter, I used Lebanese green olives from a local Lebanse/Armenian/Turkish/Russian (I know) super.

But you can use whatever you like. I'm not claiming any "best" choice other than yours.

Si. Empeltre.

BDL
post #4 of 12
Looks tasty!!! Just wondering why flouring the duck and using olive oil? I don't see anywhere, in the recipe, that the duck is being skinned. If not is it really necessary to flour the pieces and wouldn't you get plenty of fat from rendering the skin over medium heat before turning it on high to brown it?
post #5 of 12
I will be using "Rellenas de Anchoa", my favorite.


Thank you for the recipe , looks great. I sent it to my sister-in-law who is from Barcelona..........she just called me back to say she was going to make it.

A big thank you.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Petals,

Thanks.

BDL
post #7 of 12
Keeping with the Spanish Theme....

This is a planned menu for 8 clients tomorrow. ( still to be made with sister-in-law) will be....
using the "Rellenas de Anchoa" and Medeira


I will be serving this with spanish rice unless you see this post and state otherwise. Along with this will be Escalivida, roasted vegetables with stuffed cherry tomatoes, garnished with orange slices....

One of the apps will be a shrimp cocktail (3 each tail on) with Aioli.

Chupe de Mani ?

For dessert: Flan de Pina , Baba de maracuja ...lots of mousse

I have half my brain speaking french and the other ......

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Petals,

Sorry to get back to you so late.

[Emphasis mine] Again I apologize for getting back to you so late. I just didn't see the "tomorrow," when first reading this thread.

Yes to Rellenas de Anchoa, and yes to Madeira, M'dear.

There's an expression in Spanish (from Spain), el mundo Castillano, which has an underlying implication that there's a general cultural synthesis which goes with the language. That's my way of saying I wouldn't have thought of accompanying the duck with a lot of the new world things you've written about.

The rice for instance -- which should probably work well, actually. Especially if you leave the tomatoes out entirely, or possibly sub a tomatilla salsa for them. I use "Herdez," canned salsa verde as a pantry staple when I don't have time to go fresh; but don't know if it's available to you. On the other hand, a more Spanishy rice pilaf with saffron, almonds, parsley and peas would be fair to partly awesome as well.

Love it.

For non-Spanish speakers this translates as "Peanut Suck," which as Ecuadorian/Peruvian thing. Too stewy to go with the duck, which is also a bit of a stew, or "suck," if you prefer.

Your sense for sweets is impecable. I don't think you could do better than the baba de maracuja (passion fruit). Fantastic.

Hope this helps; and, again, sorry to be so late replying.

BDL
post #9 of 12
Thank you for the reply, it helped me so much. I took some notes today....

So how did it go ?................Beautiful....just everything about the whole luncheon.


Let me start off by saying that its been awhile since I cut apart duck so on that note I need to work on my "technique". But I managed to cut the breast away, first duck took time ,second went quick, alot can be said for practice.
Since I doubled the recipe (wanting more breasts) it really turned out to be a terrific meal, rich, tasty and colorful.
The white wine used was Fleur de Cap along with the Madeira. I can see why you used Madeira, it just enhanced the flavor of everything. I simmered it in the oven for almost 2 hours. The sauce coated the chicken almost like a glaze.
I used Seville marmalade, just about ¼ cup and a bit. The “rellenas de anchoa” along with the black olives and ham truly enhanced the flavor of the sauce. The garnish was thinely cut orange slices and I omitted the tomatoes.
The meat was very moist according to the comments. The colorful vegetables was a good choice.
I decided to go with your rice idea and made it with saffron (10 threads), 1 cooked onion, crushed almonds, peas, lots of parsley and served it “style de cornet” (cone shape) .
The soup.....never made it to the "printed menu" (which by the way is done for every sitting)....when I think about it now, it did “suck”. What was I thinking ?

The shrimp cocktail / aioli went over well.....some were even dipping their bread in it, I was glad. It took along time to make a big batch. There are some dishes that just have to be made with your hands and not a machine, this is one of them for me, mortar and pestle. Call me old fashioned......thats ok.

There was a lime sorbet in between because of the garlic.

I served up a micro green salad with a very light seasoned balsamic/olive oil dressing, along with some capers and pecorino shavings.

There were the usual puff pastries/canapes I made prior to serving, keeping in tune with the Mediterranean feel, eggplant, seafood , almond and fig spreads, portobello mushroom puree with garlic/honey.....

The dessert...............who would have guessed it could pair so well with the main ? These Baba de Maracuja ( little passion fruit mousses) had a wonderful fragrance, it was light yet held its own. These were served in tall stemware glasses with a mint leaf and just a bit of the passion fruit sauce which sat on the mousse.

Wine selection : Savigney-les-Beaune 2005 – Les Marconnets Premiere Cru
Gevrey Chambertin – Pierre Bourre Fils
Clos Marion 2007 – Domaine Fougeray de Beauclair
Music : Amanecer – Paplo Collado , I bought his music when I saw him this year while staying in Guat. from May-June.
Flowers: Calla Lilies.


Kitchen music : I played Della Reese..........”what else is there to do, cause”......


Chef BDL,
I thank you so much, it inspired me in so many ways. I might not of had the biggest menu BUT I HAD THE BIGGEST FLAVORS. It turned into a 3 hour lunch. This one is for the books. Some meals when done right , do not need so many apps. I am happy !

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
Chef Petals,

Absolutely delighted everything worked for you. As soon as you wrote about the passion fruit babas, I knew they'd be a hit. Great pairing. Excellent wine choices as well.

BDL
post #11 of 12
Wow :) Thanks petals and BDL! I'll certainly be referencing this one in the near future.

dan
post #12 of 12
BDL: are the olives pitted, or do you want to have people break their teeth? And are you sure you want the flour heavily salted, since you are adding a lot of salt with the green and black olives and the ham?

Also, why do you French the breasts? The wing bones will prevent them from browning evenly. Might be okay if you were just sautéing and finishing in the oven, but this will give you unevenly browned skin.

As written, this is NOT a recipe for beginners or intermediate cooks. Please consider your audience more as you write, and refrain from chefspeak ("turn your onion, carrot, and celery into mirepoix.").

I could give you lots more pointers on how to improve the writing, but then I'd have to ask you for $$$, since editing recipes is my livelihood. PM me if you want help with manuscript prep.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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