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post #241 of 526
What are the different fruit pie thickeners? How do they differ?
cooking with all your senses.....
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post #242 of 526
Depending on what result I'm looking for I'll use arrowroot, cornstarch, tapioca starch. I find cornstarch breaks down after cooled and the filling runs, rarely, but on occasion I'll use flour.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #243 of 526
Cape Chef,

Besides truffles, did that sauce also have madeira ?

Question :

In post number # 223 of this thread, I asked a question, it zoomed by....

What are 3 dishes you can make with breadfruit ?

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post #244 of 526
so as an education to all of us, what results do each give you?

PC, we don't use breadfruit around here ever.....no one I know works with it...it's not in stores....unless I go to wiki there is no way I'd know how it is used.
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post #245 of 526
I know that it can go into Poi in place of Taro, and that it is pretty good by itself roasted, but I don't know of any traditional dishes for it. If, I can get him on the phone, I'm going to cheat and ask my Samoan friend.
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post #246 of 526
Shroom,

I did not know it was a hard to find item....no wonder I HATE trying to figure out what to make with it.....I just assumed that breadfruit ( Bahamas, where I have to use it, was sold to Miami and then everywhere else) ...forget it, not important.
And results ? I agree.....need more info ....it is an important topic here. One can never know enough about dessert technique.....

Chef Ray,

If you would like to ask a friend , well you can use "that life" line, you have two more :) ! (it was a good show in the beginning)

Question: The word "Mesclun" comes from where , and name at least 5 things found in it ?

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post #247 of 526
He says his mom uses it as the starch fish cakes, slices and fries it, roasts it, mixes it with coconut and coconut milk to serve as a mash,, or stuffs it with pork and spices and braises it. He also mentioned something called Mei(sp?) which he says, "I don't know what's in it, but it's awesome bro."
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post #248 of 526
Chef Ray,

All those Breadfruit recipes are correct, "Mei" which means "breadfruit balls" is another traditional Island dish that is served all over as well. Best served with a syrup.

Thank you for the research....

One question left to answer....

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post #249 of 526
Mesclun is from Provence France.
It means mixture or to mix.
Usually includes Arugula, Dandelion, Frise'e, Radicchio and Sorrel.

What is Puttanesca, and how did the name originate?
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #250 of 526
If you are referring to "pasta puttanesca" it may or may not originate from Naples or Sicily.
"spaghetti alla puttanesca" which is a bit tangy or spicy.
The sauce from Naples with Anchovies/ From Sicily with alot of oregano and peppers.
If we are talking pasta, that is...

Yes/no ?

If I am in left field, not the first time.....

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post #251 of 526
wow, that version of mesclun sure has a lot of bold flavors happening.
Puttenesca...."lady of the night" pasta?
ours is liberally made with tomatoes, capers, chili flakes, kalamata olives, basil...yumminess.


what is labna?
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post #252 of 526
In Re "labna"

It's very thick yogurt, arguably cheese -- eastern Med style. It's almost but not quite as stiff as an Indian paneer. It's got a few spellings, which you'd expect since the word is arabic and wasn't born of our Latin alphabet. It's variously pronounced as labna, lebneh, etc., depending on which part of the Med or the sand you've got your toe in. I like it heap much beauoup plenty.

Not roaming too far: How about a good recipe for taramasalata? Without breadcrumbs please.

BDL
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post #253 of 526
Cod Roe, Lemon Juice, Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Mashed Potato, and Spring Onion.
Mince the onion, mix, and hope the oil stays emulsified.

Here's a softball:

In the American South, classic preparation of barbeque pork calls for everything but the...(fill in the blank) to be cooked.
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post #254 of 526
Everything but the squeal.

I like taramosalata with potato, but you can make an even sempler emulsion with just the eggs, oil and lemon juice.

Okay, let's stay with 'q. What are three or four of the most important reasons a fledgling pitmaster needs to learn "No peeking."

BDL
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post #255 of 526
Everything but the "OINK". yes/no ?

What is a Cypriot Meze ?

Chef BDL,

You have the honor , you just posted before me.....

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post #256 of 526
[QUOTE=boar_d_laze;289549]Did not know that. I'll have to try it with eggs. I love taramosalata, but it gets a little heavy with all of the starch.

I'll give others a crack at this one first.
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post #257 of 526
cypriot meze.....oooooo I like the sound of it.....could it be just like a
Syrian or Lebanese meze. Loads of little dishes of aps....

so cypriot, probably octopus and small fishes, olives, possibly bits of goat or lamb, pieces of offal.....maybe some dips...sheep/goat's cheese....possibly a kibbee or arincini type of fried ball with meat/cheese inside grain.

close or total miss?
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post #258 of 526
It seems Shroom got it pretty well, I'm mostly answering because the finger pointed at me. I'll try to augment, but am not sure I'm adding anything important.

Throughout the Med and the Middle East, mezze (under a variety of names) is a meal of small dishes like salads, spreads, small fish, small pieces of meat, with lots of flat bread. In non-muslim countries, alcoholic beverages are not unusual accompaniments. Some of the dishes you'll commonly find are dolmas, felafel, babaganoush, tabouleh, taramosalata (aka ikre), kebab, and so on. In many ways it has a lot in common with tapas, but is a significantly older tradition and an outgrowth of kebab cuisine.

I'm sticking with the "no peeking" question.

BDL

PS. Taraosalata with avocado and lemon on sourdough or a bagel rocks!
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post #259 of 526
You are sooooooooooooo right !!!! Both of you ....

In Cyprus, it is very popular and I just know you would love the way they cook. Tasty, colorful and one plate after another....they play traditional music and dance on chairs and tables.....and the wine....and the sun.....

Some restaurants have upto 40 dishes....for 10-15 Cypriate pounds.

Since I am not going to peek....we still need to answer Chef BDL's Question .....

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post #260 of 526
does not preclude having another question asked.....
threads stall out if there's no movement.

Are chanterelles able to be cultivated at this time....or are they all wild?
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post #261 of 526
I do not think they can be cultivated.....yes/no

What is a pave ? (accent on e)

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post #262 of 526
no, wild only


pave is a sweet pate....usually chocolate, may include nut paste...

what is OO flour?
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post #263 of 526
Shot down.....

I was looking for (pave) a lean , tender cut of beef from the center top of the leg (or higher)
But that will do just fine.....

To answer flour...very refined, super refined.

Opinion : What would you concider the worse cheese ?

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post #264 of 526
Thread Starter 
My preferred flour for wood fired pizza.
LL
post #265 of 526
Type 00 flour is ... well, the 00 is a designation of how finely the flour is milled. In Italy, and in a lot of Europe, they make the protein content hard to find. Normal Type 00 is very low protein, like 7%ish, and is used for pastry mostly.

Now Pizza Type 00, on the other hand, is just as fine, but with a lot more protein. More like 11 - 12% which is very high by Euro-standards. That's used for (you'll never guess) pizza doughs, and for a few breads as well. Especially the kind that like to collapse in on themselves like "slippers."

STILL WAITING on some good reasons as to WHY BEGINNING BARBEQUERS should observe the NO PEEKING RULE.

Come on, you can do it. I've got confidence in you.

BDL
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post #266 of 526
Thread Starter 
Provel cheese. (sorry Shroom)

What is "White Tuna?"
post #267 of 526
Thread Starter 
If you open the hood it raises the temperature of the coals?
post #268 of 526
Confidence eh ?

How about this for a starter : one must have a very good piece of meat (brisket lets say ) with either 1/3 top fat or 1/4 ......I am taking baby steps here....

And the fall is going to hurt l......

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post #269 of 526
Pave, and filet de romsteck, are both French butchering terms for a steak cut from the heart of the rump (couer de romsteck). It's the sort of steak you'd get in a brasserie for steak frites.

I'm disposed to go with "Velveeta."

BDL
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post #270 of 526
Sort of, sometimes. I'm looking for more though, there's a parade of horribles and "raises the temperature of the coals" doesn't even sound that bad.

I've got faith in you Sir Kuan.

Interesting answer, but it doesn't really relate to the question.

Your answer is interesting, because a very good piece of meat is frequently the "make or break" in contest barbecuing; but quite often backyard barbecuers delight in making a silk purse out of a sow's ear by using not only economy cuts but economy grades. Barbecue prep like brining and injection, and the usual barbecue method of "low and slow" can find a delicious, unctious tenderness where you'd least expect it.

The amount of fat necessary is in dispute. The better you know how to cook (and depending on the method), the less surface fat you need. For instance, I'm considering changing my recommendations from a 1/4" trim of fat cap on brisket for good butchers, and "just leave it alone" for beginners, to "cut it off clean" and get your rub on both sides -- but that requires both foiling and a higher temperature than many people run their pits at.

Very interesting thought though Chef Petals. Where did you get it?

BDL
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