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post #31 of 526
Ground cocoa, plus a good diastatic malt.

Have to disagree with you slightly on broiled tuna. It's a difficult fish for many cooks, in that it's wonderful when properly grilled under (or over) high heat, to very rare (like tataki), rare, or even barely medium-rare; but once it's cooked too long and/or beyond barely medium-rare, it might as well be canned tuna -- too dry, too tough, too strongly flavored.

Awfully good smoked though.

Meffy's Bender answer was funny if you haven't outgrown cartoons -- which I haven't. But we're still not getting any real action on the Best Iron Chef or on the Best TV Cook questions.

Here's another vidiocratic poser: Who's the best teaching cook currently on TV?

Just another vidiot,
BDL
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post #32 of 526
Ground cocoa, plus a good diastatic malt.
Okay, but in what proportions?

Have to disagree with you slightly on broiled tuna.
Oops, my bad. In my haste, I misread it to say grilled.

Here's another vidiocratic poser: Who's the best teaching cook currently on TV?
In my opinion, all the "good" ones have passed on.
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post #33 of 526
>Meffy's Bender answer was funny if you haven't outgrown cartoons -- which I haven't. <

What are you doing tonight BDL? Taking over the world? :lol:


~Greatest TV chef teacher, for beginners anyway must be Delia smith. Do you know her outside the UK?

Is there much difference between the different colours of sweet potato?
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #34 of 526
Valentine Warner.

Why do French people eat Andouiette?
post #35 of 526
The darker ones have more carotene, and seem to be sweeter. I always try to get the darkest flesh available.
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post #36 of 526
Got to agree with Bughut - whilst I have a sneaking admiration for Valentine, too - he isn't much of a teacher!

How can anyone bring themselves to eat foie gras?
post #37 of 526
1) Because if they didn't, who else would?

2) Because it makes a mighty poor substitute for automatic transmission fluid.

3) Because anything made from a part of the swine whose name sounds like "cologne" must smell good, n'est-ce pas?

4) Efficiency and economy taken to horrifying extremes -- that would be my "real" guess.

To fortify themselves, they think: "Hélas! -- but at least it's not andouiette."

Q: What does the word "parve" (or "pareve") often printed on the packaging of Jewish foods mean?
post #38 of 526
Parve means the food contains neither meat nor dairy, so it may be served with either.

oops...keep forgetting to ask a question...

How many tablespoons in a cup?
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post #39 of 526
Not posting an answer or question to follow this - just need more info....are we speaking imperial or metric?

2 different languages :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #40 of 526
8 oz american
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post #41 of 526
I've always liked Morimoto, on both ICA and ICJ.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #42 of 526

jerkseasoning

You never know -- History does have a tendancy to repeat itself.;)

P.S. I and many others in England never use metric only pounds and ounces - think "gramme" is some sort of flour - ha ha!! - :rolleyes:
post #43 of 526

jerkseasoning

Imperial pint = 20 fluid ounces
post #44 of 526
Because it tastes great! Have you ever had it?
post #45 of 526

jerkseasoning

Originally Posted by indianwells
Why do French people eat Andouiette?



They eat them here, called "Chitterlings":mad:
post #46 of 526
Righto...am guessing parts of the US are metric, parts are not.
My guess at how many Tbsp per cup = about 9 Tbsp
I shall probably stand corrected, no prob.

(Gosh this thread is getting messy hehe :D We knew it would)

My question: When making a chicken breast wrapped in bacon (no filler), should I brown off the breast first till almost firm/cooked, let it cool a tad, then wrap in bacon, and grill/broil until bacon is crispy, serve immediately?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #47 of 526
As a practical matter, no part of the US is metric -- at least not for cooking.

No, not even close, 16 tbs per cup. 3 tsp per tbs, 2 tbs per oz. 8 oz per cup, 2 cups per pt (NB, that's 16 ounces, hence the phrase "a pint's a pound, the world around" as a pound is also 16 oz), 2 pts per qt, and 4 qts per gal.

The ounce is the only avoirdupois unit measurement which translates straight across as both weight and volume. That is, one ounce of water (by volume) weighs one ounce

Consider yourself stood.

No, bard the breast before cooking.

Which imparts better mouthfeel and more gloss to a sauce, "mounting" with butter, or sieving?

BDL
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post #48 of 526
For the Iron Chef question, I'm going for Morimoto as the best and, from what I've seen, Cora as the worst.

For the best teaching chef on TV, I'm going Justin Wilson(God rest his soul) is still in syndication around here. I suppose that makes him the winner of that challenge.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #49 of 526
Ditto on all three counts. :thumb:
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post #50 of 526
Almost. When I cut into the casing what I can only describe as a load of guts spilled out and the smell was quite disgusting. I couldn't bring myself to put any of it in my mouth. The locals thought it quite amusing. I didn't.
post #51 of 526
Sieving just gets the chunks out, however fine they might be. Butter is the way to go.

I'm surprised there wasn't more discussion on my salting sweats and sautes. Maybe I should have asked something simple like what is the difference between a sstock and a broth, or does searing meat seal in the juice.

Actually, I do have a question with which I could use some help. The church my wife attends celebrated its 117th anniversary this weekend, I made a BIG pot of gravy for the lunch that was served. Actually I'll start a new thread, don't want to hijack this one.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #52 of 526
Thread Starter 
You're supposed to ask a question.

Who has the best stand mixer these days?
post #53 of 526
Hobart

how do you make taquitos stay rolled and pretty?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #54 of 526
Seal it with a flour paste when rolling before deep frying.
(or if they fall apart or look ugly, tie them wth a blanched spring onion/garlice chive green top)

Q: Deep fried sliced shallots - how to store if you have done them in bulk?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #55 of 526
paper lined box.....how long are you thinking of keeping them?

Does freezing a fresh shell bean effect it's texture (pre cooking)? specifically cranberry beans.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #56 of 526
You can use flour paste, water, or eggwash to glue Australian taquitos shut, but it's not such a good idea with Mexican taquitos. Mostly because they're (a) unnecessary; and (b) won't work with corn tortillas anyway.

Before filling and rolling, heat fresh, corn tortillas on a comal or griddle until they're hot and very (as opposed to barely) pliable.

If the tortillas are fresh, and you're frying immediately -- hold the taquitos seam side down. Deep fry or pan fry in very hot oil. If pan frying, place them into the pan seam side down, and gravity will hold them together until the fryng process sets their shape. If deep frying, they should stay together when they go into the oil, then crisp into shape immediately; but ...

If the tortillas have a mind of their own, pin the taquitos with toothpicks.

If you're planning on holding the taquitos for more than a few hours, you may want to freeze them. Simply place them skin side down on a sheet, cover tightly with cling wrap, freeze, and repackage in a plastic freezer bag. The frozen taquitos will hold together long enough for the oil to crisp them into shape.

Why do women have emotional attachments to their old, half-melted, plastic spatulas?

BDL
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post #57 of 526
Because every burn or mark has a memory.....

FWIW ...Masaharu Morimoto is King of the kitchen

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #58 of 526
Where is the best Paprika from and why do you say so ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #59 of 526
Spanish and Basque (both sides of the border) -- In particular, every which kind of Chiquilin (Spanish), especially their ehumado (smoked), and Biperduna's incredibly wonderful Piment D'Espelette (French-Basque).

What's the best recipe and technique for tempura?

There's more to basques than lingerie,
BDL
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post #60 of 526
Batter
1 cup of cake flour
2 cups of corn starch
2 egg yolks
1/2 cup of cold water with ice

Mix the cake flour, cornstarch , egg yolks and water , mixing quickly till smooth. If the batter becomes warm add more ice cubes if batter becomes warm add more ice water, it should be cold and smooth.

Am I on the money ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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