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post #301 of 526
If memory serves me, it is a fermented, fertilized egg and is a deliacy in the Phillipeans.
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post #302 of 526
Temperature variation, loss of moisture, loss of smoke(the source of flavor, bark, and the smoke ring), temptation to "shark the bark," temptation to add some horrible mopped on glaze, and the smell will draw hungry neighbors like moths to a flame.;)


What is traditional thickener for a lassi?
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post #303 of 526
A balut is a bird embryo, boiled and eaten in the shell in Southeast Asia and the Phillipines. They were featured on an episode of "Survivor, China," as "disgusting."

They're good.

Kudos to ChefRay for his "No Peeking" answer.

BDL
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post #304 of 526
thickener of lassi?
hmmmm...isn't it fruit/kefir....nope don't know.

Guys remember when you answer a question ask another.

I'll throw another into the pot even though lassi is still up for answers.

Where is the chain of an animal?
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post #305 of 526
A bacterial culture. It runs against and parallel to the tenderloin. As a valued cut, it gets more use in Euro cuisine and is known the "bavette." Here in the US it's often marketed a bit confusingly as tenderloin or as "tips." Often used for stroganoff, and it does a good job. With a little clean up it makes a fine boeuf tartare

Two related questions which in their hearts are as one: What's an Hx machine? Why make an Hx machine do the water dance?

BDL
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post #306 of 526
Hx machine is an expresso machine....water dance ? ummmmm....

Lassi .....coconut milk ? yogurt ? truly authentic ?

Petals
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post #307 of 526
Someone asked me how to bone a leg of lamb without tearing it up and wasting meat.
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post #308 of 526
Ding, ding, ding.

Maybe the "right" answer is the ratio of other, thinner liquids, to yogurt, and the way(s) in which they're combined. I.e., a thick lassi has a lot of yogurt, very little milk, and is mixed gently rather than frothed.

Still waiting on the meaning and use of the "water dance." At least Chef Petals has defined the context as heat exchanger type espresso machines. That should be enough of a hint. Nicko knows. If you decide to research it online, Home Barista and Coffee Geek both have it -- but you'll have to burrow.

Speaking of espresso, sometimes you'll see the barista tap the porrofilter against the palm of her (or his) right hand before tamping the fines. Why?

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post #309 of 526
Either thick yogurt or active yogurt cultures and milk, which makes thick yogurt, is right. Bonus points for the technique also.:thumb:
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post #310 of 526
If I check those websites I would have to burrow.....NO ! I refuse to check and see what "water dance" is. It must have something to do with the way the water is filtered, the only thing I can come up with....

Keeping that question still in mind......

I would like to ask: What are the 5 ingredients to basil pesto ? (easy one)

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post #311 of 526
I get six:
  • Basil
  • Salt
  • Garlic
  • Pine nuts
  • Pecorino cheese
  • (Good) Extra-virgin olive oil

Hint: The water-dance has nothing to do with filtration, and everything to do with the fact that the machine is a heat-exchanger.

And what about tapping the porrofilter? What about that, eh?

BDL
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post #312 of 526
Chef BDL,

Please allow me to count sheep before I get an "Intracerebral Hemorrhage"....must give this heat- exchanger more thought....tapping the porrofilter ?...ummmm .....

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post #313 of 526
Petals cherie -- not everyone is a barista. Be of good cheer, you whip my behind in desserts.

A heat exchanger espresso machine heats the brewing water in a hollow coil in the boiler (which holds steam and water for steaming and Americanos). The coil is the actual "heat exchanger," and it draws its heat from the boiler which is usually heated by an electric element and that's usually controlled by a "pressurestat."

Because the steamer is kept hotter than the correct brew temperature to make steam, if the machine isn't used for awhile, the water in the heat exchanger equlibriates at the boiler temp which is too hot for brewing. The overly-hot water must be drained, so fresh water can come in and be heated to the appropriate temperature. The water is so hot, it comes out as mixture of steam and water and jumps around as though it were dancing. That's called the "water dance."

Most commercial grinders have a "dosatore," which dispenses the ground coffee into the coffe holder (aka porrofilter). It does it by rotating a disc with a hole in it. When the hole in the disc lines up with the dispensing spout's hole, coffee comes out. But because the disc is rotating it spins the coffee clockwise. That is, it puts "left English" on the grounds. So the coffee mounds up higher on the left in the porrofilter. Before compressing it (tamping) to make the "puck," the barista taps the porrofilter against her right palm to center the top of the mound.

Fraicheur, n'est pas?

I really like that question, because it stumped the guys over at Home Barista for months. They kept trying to come up with intelligent, engineer type reasons; instead of the prosaically practical. While I didn't raise the question, I didn't answer it either. The bizarre hypotheses were just too wonderful.

When stripping the membrane off the back of a raw rack of ribs, what's the best non-slip tool for holding it?

BDL
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post #314 of 526
I use my fingers but needle nose pliers may work too.

what's in a barvarian?
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post #315 of 526
Use your fingers for what?

Cream and gelatine are sine qua non. Different flavorings make alternative bavarians.

My aunt makes a lemon/lime yogurt fluff which is a sort of bavarian alternative and is quite simply (and somewhat oddly) to die for. The highlight of a many a family meal.

What's in Mexican (driknking) chocolate (cho ko LA tay)?

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post #316 of 526
Thread Starter 
Cinnamon.

What's your favorite way to eat duck?
post #317 of 526
Thank you for that information on coffee and the process......it is an "art".

Love anything Bavarian....

Roasted duck with Marmalade, ginger, and chilli glaze.

What is tripe ? Do you like it ?

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post #318 of 526
slit rib skin with knife, pull off with fingers.....or needle nose pliers....I'm a finger kinda girl.

XOCO has some interesting chocolate drinks that are made with chilis, cinnamon, some with water or almond milk or milk in all it's degrees of richness. What's great is that they grind the cacao on site in site.

Tripe, linings of cow belly...honey comb tripe is pretty prevelant around here.
Yep I like tripe, prefer tendon....good in Pho. There's a french dish I tried to make once and just made a huge nasty mess.....that was in my teenage experimental stage (sorry MOM, love you)

How do you cook tongue, let's shoot for beef?
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post #319 of 526
Beef tongue with Aioli sauce

Vinegar, water, carrots, onion, bouquet garni, salt

Soak tongue "overnight", fill dutch oven with water, and cook for one hour....drain,
Fill with water again, cook, drain, cool and skin.
very quick answer...


What is in Mousseline sauce ? served with ?

The coffe info is going the "book" by the way !!!!!

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post #320 of 526
Hollandaise with whipped cream folded in.

I like it with trout. It's pretty good on poached catfish too.
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post #321 of 526
Thread Starter 
Scrambled Eggs Mousseline gratinee is one of my favorite ways to prepare eggs.

What is YOUR favorite Hollandaise based sauce?
post #322 of 526
bernaise

But prefer buerre blanc to most others....what is it?
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post #323 of 526
Shallots and Lemon Juice(some use vinegar, but I prefer citrus) reduced to almost dry with butter added off heat until creamy.
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post #324 of 526
Here !Here ! for anyone who likes Mousseline Sauce, crazy about the the taste and dipping artichokes in it....on salmon , any fish for that matter , eggs...
Beurre Blanc....wonderful.

Saffron Cream for scallops.
Another great sauce , "Tartare Sauce", eggs, , lemon juice, olive oil, capers, gherkins,chives, parsley....for fried or GRILLED fish.

what is in veal marengo ?

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post #325 of 526
Hm... poached eggs? Onions, garlic, mushrooms, tomatoes, wine?? Going from memory for Julia Child's Chicken Marengo I saw her prepare on TV about 45 years ago!
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post #326 of 526
Terriffic question.

Anything "Marengo," is prepared in the Piedomont version of a "chasseur." That is, with white, wine, tomato and mushrooms in additon to the veal.

The myth is that Napoleon's chef invented "chicken Marengo," following the battle of Marengo, and it's a lovely story. I wouldn't bet on its truth though. Nevertheless, sometimes a bit of cognac is added in respect to and remembreance of the contents of the Emperor's flask. So, if it isn't true -- it ought to be. Pass the flask.

For whatever reason when you prepare a Marengo you always flute the mushrooms "just so," or chef Hans will become quite peeved and start throwing stuff. Don't ask.

Oh, and eggs. Did I mention that fried eggs, cooked "easy" are a traditional and frequent accompaniment? I like to garnish the eggs with crossed anchovies -- making for some mixed geography.

Follow up Question: Anything garnished with a lightly fried egg, which itself as garnished with anchovies is said to be served "ala _______" [fill in the blank] ?

Real Question
(Easy): Most Americans think of ramen as Japanese food. What do most Japanese consider its origin to be?

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post #327 of 526
China.

My question, and I don't know the answer, Why should some types of sandwiches (say a Cuban) be pressed/weighted?
post #328 of 526
Why press a sandwich? Texture, toast-osity, ooziness of the cheese, and it makes the sandwich taste all of a piece, from the pickles to the cheese to the meats. Also, they hold together well; you can handle your sammy one-handed making it possible to eat while doing something else with your other hand.

Is that what they mean by OTOH?

One thing's for sure. You don't often see pleated sandwiches, so "crisp folds" can't ever be the answer to "why press?" On the other hand (didn't see that coming, did you?), one never likes to see a sandwich with a wrinkled placket.

What sort of food does the Korean version of a "Japanese Restaurant" (and there's not only such a thing, it's a huge and pervasive thing) serve? That is, if you were comparing to one type of Japanese restaurant, what would that type be?

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post #329 of 526
Follow up Question: Anything garnished with a lightly fried egg, which itself as garnished with anchovies is said to be served "ala _______" [fill in the blank] ?

Real Question (Easy): Most Americans think of ramen as Japanese food. What do most Japanese consider its origin to be?

BDL[/QUOTE]
A la Colmar ?
A la finnoise ?
A la gallega ?

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post #330 of 526
Petals,

Fantastic memory! But not what I had in mind.

Finnoise is in a tomato sauce (I had to look it up). Gallega is (sort of) hard boiled. Colmar (had to look that one up too) is an impromptu (originated at the Hotel Colmar), probably not very well known under that name, and also barely hard boiled.

What I had in mind was the style of garnish call ala holstein. It's most associated with fried, breaded veal -- which is, if you substitute dusting with flour for breading, more or less the base of your Veal Marengo.

I love Marengos, and while I was catering suggested them as a "hold up to a chaffer and other rough treatment" dishes. You can do the sauce and meat separately, and assemble them on site -- with the sauce carrying most of the load of heating the meat.

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