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post #361 of 526
I was looking for it specifically and just asked the clerk. He pointed me toward the stock/soup section and I started digging. The back label, with the ingredients, was partially in english. That's the only way I knew what it was for certain.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #362 of 526
I have been called "the asperagus of the poor in France". It has been said that Nero ate me in a soup every day to "clarify" his voice. Toss me in a stew, or a quiche because that is where you will likely find me ! What am I ?

______________(fill in the blank) is one of the mother sauces in French cooking. It is made with a beurre manie (accent on e) Add cream to me and I become what ?

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post #363 of 526
I think you may be referring to leeks?

Which liquer is supposedly a recipe given from Bonnie Prince Charlie to his rescuer from the British army?
post #364 of 526
Yes on the Leeks...

Is it Drambuie Liqueur ?

One question left.....


What are 2 foods you would never eat ?

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post #365 of 526
1) Oatmeal
2) Cream of Wheat

No Hot Cereals ever! Everything else is fair game!

What was the first thing you ever cooked a second time?
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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post #366 of 526
When I was young...ummm cough.....I am an old 42 ( you never feel your age)......

Pasta ! they ordered " el dente " and nearly took a tooth out ..... my first week on the job at sixteen working at a Bistro, .....summer job ( it was then that I fell in love with food and wanted to please the palate ) ....




what is yeast ?

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post #367 of 526
yeast are fungi


Black Walnuts & Hickory Nuts are popular in USA midwest....what frustrating commonality do they have?

And another just to make sure there's activity.....There are French praline and Louisiana praline, anyone tell us about them?
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #368 of 526
There can be many opinions on this but the Praline comes originally from France, made its way to great US. It is suppose to made with almonds but because of the large pecan produce , it got replace. What is an authentic Praline ? Hard to say....
Today we can see all sorts of things in them, my love for sweets passes this way too. Many have assorted fruits now, or different alcohols, even marshmellow.
No longer a candy from France but now of the great US.
FWIW. My boss buys 50 lbs of pecan chocolates a year from Sunnyland Farms. Including.....yes, a sweet tooth.

I do not know the other question...opening ?
From a previous post still not answered.....

______________(fill in the blank) is one of the mother sauces in French cooking. It is made with a beurre manie (accent on e) Add cream to me and I become what ?

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post #369 of 526
Thread Starter 
Veloute, Supreme.

Which do you like better? Cha Gio or Lumpia?
post #370 of 526
Kuan, not fair....I like them both......ahhh...spring or Imperial ?...BOTH, can I pick both ? No...ok Imperial

Name 3 types of teas:

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post #371 of 526
O-cha (Japanese green); Borocha (Korean roasted barley), Lapsong Souchong (Chinese pine-smoked black).

Why do most European coffees contain a little bit of robusta along with arabica?

Why (oh why) then are US coffees almost not always blended and sold without any robusta; but even proudly advertised as 100% arabica
?

Do you know what's in your blend? Any robusta?

What? Am I still asking questions in italics?

Soooooooooooreeeeeeeeeeee,

BDL
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post #372 of 526
Well now, I buy "Lavazza" for my expresso machine. Is there any Robusta in Lavazza ?
Which is better ? Robusta or Arabica ?

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post #373 of 526
Lavazza has mostly arabica and un peu robusta, about 10% if I remember correctly. Lavazza is good stuff.

As to the other question: Not fair at all! I [sob] protest. If I answer your question, I've [sniffle] answered mine.

BDL [lower lip trembling]
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post #374 of 526
:lol::lol::lol::lol: Let me think this one over......it may take a bit of time...bear with ol' Frenchie here.....

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post #375 of 526
Q :Why do most European coffees contain a little bit of robusta along with arabica?
A: I truly do not know why....please expound

Q: Why (oh why) then are US coffees almost not always blended and sold without any robusta; but even proudly advertised as 100% arabica?
A : Is there not a loop hole in every LAW ? By the way, I do not know either....has to do with litigation ? (I know....left field)

Q; Do you know what's in your blend? Any robusta?
A: yes because you told me, and that was very kind of you. Which is better ? Robusta or Arabica ? While we are talking about Arabica....where Arabica get its name ? Which one do you prefer and why ?

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post #376 of 526
In my opinion:

Most good European blends have about 10% robusta beans. Arabica beans have fuller flavor, and are less acid. Robustas act to intensify the flavor, add a little brightness to the blend, cut through muddiness, and add some zip with their higher caffeine content.

If you're a home roaster, or putting together a sophisticated blend -- especially for a good espresso machine, you want to consider about 5% - 15% robusta. IMO, the robusta from India and around the sub-continent work the best in the typical Euro blend which is usually also around 40% - 50% Brazilian Arabicas.

Robustas are generally smaller then arabica beans -- with the exception of peaberry arabica.

It's my (educated) speculation that American coffee merchants advertise their blends as 100% arabica because North American consumers are so unsophisticated they can be bamboozled into believing that if arabica beans are more expensive and generally preferable, all arabica must be better still.

The US isn't really what you'd call a coffee country, at least not compared to Western European and Latin American countries. But we sure think we are.

BDL
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post #377 of 526
Very interesting points on coffee. Alot can said for ......well I will save my opinion for later....acquiesce.

What no question ?

Ok, here is one : What are eggs Poonah ?

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post #378 of 526
Where Arabica got its name.....I did not know, so you have forced me into Google mode :D.

Here's a quote from About.com, which makes sense:

Arabica got its name around the 7th century when the bean crossed the Red Sea from Ethiopia to present-day Yemen and the lower Arab peninsula (hence arabica).

As I'm not a coffee gourmand, I'll not answer the question:

"Which is better and why?"

Get to it ladies and gents.

P.S. BDL - stop trembling that bottom lip, it's very disconcerting

P.P.S. Eggs Poonah - had no idea, so it was off to cheat from Google :peace: Here it is from Chestofbooks.com:

Curried Eggs In Surprise A La Poonah Oeufs Surprise En Ka/ri A La Poonah

Boil eight fresh eggs for ten minutes, then cut off a slice at the bottoms, take out the yolks, and pound them with a pinch of Marshall's Coralline Pepper, one saltspoonful of essence of anchovy, and two ounces of picked shrimps; pass through a sieve, add a gill of whipped cream, and, when ready to serve, warm the whites of the eggs in boiling water, drain them, and make the puree hot, and fill the whites of the eggs with it by means of a forcing bag with a plain pipe; dish up in a border of rice (vol. i.), with Curry sauce round the dish and some of the rice in the centre; sprinkle the eggs with a little coral and chopped parsley, and use for a luncheon or for an entree for a dinner.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #379 of 526
Funny that you mention Latin America. I used to work with a Cuban gentleman who called American coffee "dirty water." I was confused until I tried his coffee at his home. Now that is a quality cup.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #380 of 526
Love Cuban style coffee. Love, love, love it!

Also, cafe Latino (very, very strong "regular" coffee). Greek/ Turkish/ Arab coffee - oishi!. An intense dark roast in a cafetiere (French press) rocks too. Vietnamese coffee (cafe filtre) -- two enthusiastic thumbs up; even cafe sua. Heck, I even like a nice mellow cup of joe from a regular ol' filter pot.

Linda likes flavored coffees (ugh!) and lattes. Oh well, I'm happy to make the lattes for her.

My stone favorite is Italian style espresso, no sugar, no lemon peel, no nothin' but heat, crema and a syrupy texture. But I'm really glad there's no law restricting you to one kind.

Should we revive this thread?

BDL
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post #381 of 526
Yes !

Can you describe "Ballotine" ? What is it ?

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post #382 of 526
I can! I also seem to remember you making one fairly recently.

A ballotine is a piece of meat, bird or fish, that's been boned and opened -- stuffed with a forecemeat -- then rolled, tied into a cylinder and cooked -- usually but not always by poaching. The cylinder thing is important, I think.

There are plays on ballotines that involve removing the bones without opening the protein -- especially foul. As in, removing the ribs, keel, back, and sometimes the thigh bones (if you're really good), without opening the bird except at the vent. Then, you use the forcemeat to make the bird (boid?) conform to its original shape.

If you serve one of those elaborate bad boys cold, it's a gallantine. I'm not sure what it is if you serve it hot.

What are Mr. Brown and Miss White?

BDL
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post #383 of 526
Mr. Brown and Miss White?

Good southern BBQ terms, for one.

The dark outer layer of pork BBQ is Mr. Brown.
The lighter inside is Miss White.

I like my plate of BBQ heavy on Mr. Brown.


What is Achee and how would you serve it.
post #384 of 526
FWIW: It turned out great Chef BDL.

KHunter,

An island dish, usually served with fish.....served with fried vegetables. But its way too poisonous.

I am a turkish soup made with beef stock and dumplings, I enjoy being garnished with yogurt , thyme and mint, what is my name ?

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post #385 of 526
The Achee I was thinking of is entirely different and native to the US. You may need to be a code-talker to fully appreciate its characteristics.
post #386 of 526
It's a fruit. Borrowed this from Cookingglossary.org

"What is it? a bright red tropical fruit containing three large black seeds and a soft creamy white flesh which is toxic when un-rippen. also known as blighia sapida. "

Apparently you have to be very careful in its preparation as it can be very poisonous otherwise, like the cashew nut.

BTW, good clues KHunter :)

Soup answer: I'll hazard a guess....either Chuchvara or Tushbera?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #387 of 526
Achee is a traditional Navajo item (and a tropical fruit apparently as well so I learned something new).

Achee in the US is Sheep gut wrapped tightly around a stick and grilled over coals. served with fry bread, or a tortilla perhaps, plus a roasted green chile and maybe some mutton. You find any number of food stalls serving it at the Shiprock, NM flea market and elsewhere around the reservation. Toughest-chewiest thing you may ever try to consume. And an acquired taste for sure. I try it now and again but can't say I love it. Just always try the end-member examples of various cuisines. And besides when you are eating very greasy mutton, it is nice to also eat somehting that makes the mutton seem less greasy by comparison :-)
post #388 of 526
Thanks for the answer KHunter. You posted while I was writing how stumped I was. That out of the way, it sounds like something I'd actually like.

You get to ask another question, 'mano.

BDL
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post #389 of 526

Speaking of Egbert Souse...

Pardon me for responding to my own challenge, but no one seems to be picking up the guantlet of more questions. So:

What was W. C. Field's famous objection to water as a beverage?

BDL
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post #390 of 526
"Fish f*ck in it" :)

As long as we are discussing bodily functions; what are the 'waste' products produced by yeast fermentation?
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
Reply
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