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post #391 of 526
CO2 and alcohol.

Question, hmmm.

How is Chinese bean sauce made?
post #392 of 526
wrong answer deleted
post #393 of 526
Grind or mash douchi with garlic and a bit of light (OK, usually light) soy sauce. You could add vinegar, (Chinese) wine, stock, or whatnot to dilute and thin, if you like. Douchi, FWIW, is fermented black beans with salt. And, come to think of it, even though you almost always see it, the garlic is optional.

And, come to think a little more of it, you can buy bean paste or bean sauce already made, but it's a lot better and no trouble to make your own from douchi. Now douchi is something you do buy ready-made. Note: Lee Kum Kee brand douchi may not be the absolute best, but it's widely available and just fine.

1st Question: How would you make the al diablo sauce for pescado or camarones al diablo? In other words, a good recipe.

2d (and related) Question: How hot (picante) do you like yours?

Note: It's one of my favorite dishes, and I'm serious about improving my own recipes and presentations. You don't have to be too mainstream. Please share any thoughts you have on twists, takes or plays. Lately, I've been puddling the sauce as a sort of mole and presenting grilled fish or shrimp on top of it. But the best I ever had (Jacalito on Valley Blvd., in El Monte) is served more prosaically with the fish (or shrimp) swamped in the sauce. I like mine very, even ridiculously hot; and Jacalito makes it that way -- you pretty much need to sign a waiver before they'll serve it. However, I don't cook it that way so as not to blow other people out.

BDL
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post #394 of 526
While that's not wrong, I was thinking more along the lines of yellow bean sauce than fermented black beans so I guess I should have been more specific.
post #395 of 526
Phil, I'll double down if you don't mind. Yellow bean sauce is fermented soy beans with salt, sugar and/or garlic. Or at least the jarred yellow beans you can buy as a garnish or the first step in a more complex sauce. That can either be sweet or hot. The not variations are common chiu chow thing, so you see it in South East Asian cooking, like Thai and Battambang.

In Thai it's called nam jim. I'm not sure about Cambodian.

To make the hot you crush or pulverize a bunch of (peeled) ginger; add some fermented and seasoned yellow beans from a jar; slice some thai-bird or other interesting chilis, like serranos, into it; some chopped cilantro; sugar, a little dark soy sauce; a little stock or wine; stir, taste, adjust. Major good on boiled... excuse me... poached chicken served on fragrant rice cooked with the chicken fat and winter melon soup prepared with the poaching liquid, i.e., kow mun gai, awesome stuff. Also good poured in Cambodian fish and wide-noodle soup along with sambal (big personal fave) and/or sriracha.

You can make nam jim with very young ginger too, which will net you a really nice variation.

More like what you meant?

BDL
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post #396 of 526
Garlic, Onion, Roasted Red Pepper, Safflower oil, Mexican Oregano, Canned Chipotle(save the adobo), and Lime Soaked Cilantro(I like a little freshness).

Marinate the shrimp in the adobo for a little extra fire.

Chop the garlic, peppers(seeds and all), and onion and saute in the oil until the onion is well sweated. At this point, remove the shrimp from the adobo and add it to the saute and let it all simmer just long enough to get good and married.

Remove from heat and add all of that to a blender with the cilantro and oregano and puree. Simmer the shrimp in this wonderfully hot goo until done.

I like to serve it with saffron rice and garnish with a little of the soaked cilantro on the side for relief when it's all said and done.



That's how other people like it. My wife and I prefer to add a few Scotch Bonnets to the mix because we hate our tongues enough to eat that, I suppose.

Sticking with Mexican(hint), from where does Tabasco Sauce get its name?
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post #397 of 526
I believe it is a state in Mexico...? So it's a matter that exsists in state (the state in which matter maintains a fixed volume but adapts to the shape of its container).
So I believe "Tabasco" is a sentient being from outer space that may or may not enjoy the shape of the bottle that we put it in: we may never know.

I'm not making this up.

Why do washed rind cheeses smell so bad, but taste so good?
post #398 of 526
Think ole McIlhenny named it Tabasco for the meaning of that Indian word rather than for a Mexican state. At least that is what the company website says.
From WhatscookingAmerica.net: At first he wanted to call this new sauce Petite Anse Sauce (after the island), but when family members baked at the commercial use of the family’s island name, he opted for his second choice “Tabasco.” Some historians say it’s a Central American Indian word that means “land where the soil is hot and humid.” This certainly describes the climate of Avery Island. Other historians have put forth that it actually means “place of coral or oyster shell.”

Oddly enough, wikipedia credits the name as coming from the state in Mexico.

Who cares how it got its name the key point is that it is the saving grace for those sterile hotel breakfast-bar scrambled eggs.

We already have the next question in the queue
post #399 of 526
Both right. It's named for the Central American peppers that make it so good, the Tabasco chili(oddly enough it's the only chili that grows up rather than hangs from the stem), and they got them from the Mexican state of Tabasco originally.

It also may be a sentient being and , along with Thai Chilis, may or may not like our storage of it.
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post #400 of 526
Left4bread:
Why do washed rind cheeses smell so bad, but taste so good?

Taste good .....I have a hard like getting over the smell so bad part. I look forward to your opinion.

What is "waterzoi" ?

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post #401 of 526
Petals...do you mean a Waterzoi of chicken, or fish, or of both? :)
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post #402 of 526
:lol: Fish, I was looking for fish. Well now it is your turn to ask away....

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post #403 of 526
Merci Petals :)

Waterzoi: basically a court boullion with fish and heavy cream. Yum!

Is steak tartar chopped or minced. traditionally?
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post #404 of 526
Well now .....

My grandfather always minced his but I chop mine. What a nice dish by the way, make it alot....so I am going to guess chopped, but I believe both ways are good. Just depends "Da Cook". I am interested in the answer....

Is there another question ? SVP

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post #405 of 526
I couldn't stand the idea of a minced steak tartar for some reason - it doesn't make sense, but there it is. Chopped is the way for me, and someone may correct me, but I think originally, it was chopped very fine. Knives were invented before meat grinders :) I love the stuff, and beef carpaccio too.

Another poster for next question....I've been greedy.

Petals? :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #406 of 526
OK. Here's a question. What makes a paella different from other arroces (rice dishes)?

Hint: It's not the ingredients.

BDL
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post #407 of 526
Paella is cooked in a wide steel pan and other arroces are cooked in deep ceramics. Not only is the technique different, but the final texture. The longer cooking times and deeper dishes lead to a firmer rice grain in the arroces.

Forgot my question:

What was the original base for ketchup as we know it.(Hint: it's not tomatoes.)
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post #408 of 526
It's the pan in which it is cooked. The pan is called a paella, no matter what the matter is in there. Obviously, generally a moist rice stock enrichened dish with a form of protein or 5 :)

How long should you coddle an egg for?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #409 of 526
Chef Ray ,

Vinegar ?

DC,

For the average egg, 5-6 minutes longer if the egg is bigger 7-8

What dairy product is used in beef stroganoff ? And which preferred alcohol ?

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post #410 of 526
Mushrooms!

Who currently makes a decent 30" gas range with telescoping downdraft? Preferably with a super-low function on at least one of the eyes?
post #411 of 526
Not mushrooms. Not vinegar either, although that's a lot closer. No, it's fish. Yummy, pickled fish. Chinese "kat-si-ap," the grand-daddy of them all, was fish sauce. When it moved out of Asia the Euros used anchovies. Keep the ketchup and pass the Caesar salad.

Sour cream. Cognac.

You guys all got the answer right, but just thought I'd add the name for the pan, which is paellera in Spanish. I think you can actually make a pretty good paella in almost any wide, low-sided, flat bottomed pan -- a big skillet for instance -- but a paellera works best by far. And once you get away from any of the parameters which would make the rice pile too high, or not allow the moisture to evaporate quickly, or prevent the formation of a bottom crust (socarra), it's an arroce and not a paella. No woks, for instance.

Mushrooms?

GE, Jenn-Air and Kenmore make downdraft ranges. None have a good rep. Whirlpool, Kitchen-Aid and Jenn-Air (reverse alphabetical order, neat huh?) make separate telescoping range hoods. None have a good rep.

I'll leave decent to you.

Mushrooms?!

Speaking of fungus, there's one that's used in Mexican cooking which is often compared to truffles, but doesn't grow under or out of the ground. What is it?


BDL
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post #412 of 526
Speaking of fungus, there's one that's used in Mexican cooking which is often compared to truffles, but doesn't grow under or out of the ground. What is it?

huitlacoche ?

Easiest way to make sabayon ?

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post #413 of 526
yep that would be corn smut.

double boiler.....or ban marie.

what is spelt?
cooking with all your senses.....
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post #414 of 526
It's a sort of ur-wheat, that was pretty much out of favor as modern wheat grains knocked it out of "sophisticated" marketplaces except as animal food. Lately it's been making a comeback. Gives multi-grain breads a nice, nutty taste. I can't always get it, but when I can, I like to use it in a multi-grain bread with barley and oats.

There's been a lot of buzz in culinary knife circles about Mario Battali using a Misono Sweden gyuto (chef's knife). On the same episode (Battali/Legasse vs. Comerford/Flay) what brands of chef's knives (or gyuto) did at least two of the other three other chef's use? Bonus points for identifying all three.

BDL
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post #415 of 526
Trust you to make this all grind to a halt :D j/k BDL...wouldn't have a clue.

Anyone?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #416 of 526
Good point. Unfair question for the forum. I thought it would be neat to have something that wasn't really easy to google, but it does require (a) watching the show; and (b) being very interested in knife brands. (b) at least is kind of dumb.

So, as nearly as I could observe: Comerford - MAC Pro; Flay - Nenox; and, Legasse - "Emerilware" (a cheap line made by Wusthof).

Interestingly (or not), that puts medium-high end Japanese knives in the hands of Comerford and Batali, very high end Japanese in Flay's; and el junko in Emeril's. It seems Comerford and Batali buy their knives with their own money.

Someone else ask the next question.

Feeling unworthy,
BDL
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post #417 of 526
It is interesting .... it's amusing to see that Emerilware is a cheap brand - that gave a good laugh.

Will leave the board open for next question.

P.S. Never unworthy, just too well informed :D A little knowledge can be dangerous...but a lot...scary thought!
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #418 of 526
may I ask one then ?

I am concidered a delicacy in many parts of the world. I have a soft texture, have a delicious , subtle , nut-like flavour and I am a definite favourite among advanced sushi eaters....what am I

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post #419 of 526
Uni, aka sea urchin.

A comment in a different thread made me think that a lot of people don't know this -- but it's sure worthwhile knowledge for those who drink coffee.

How "fresh" or how old from the roaster should coffee be, before brewing? If you break it down by brewing methods, that would be jake by me.

BDL
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post #420 of 526
No less than 2 days but no more than 15. That's a rule of thumb. I don't know for specific brewing methods.


Name the two major types of Sake. Bonus points if you know what the Wine-Brandy equivalent partner is for Sake. I mean by that, Wine distills into Brandy and Sake distills into______.
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