or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Ask the person below
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ask the person below - Page 17

post #481 of 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by petalsandcoco View Post

What part of a cattail is edible.....



I believe the roots are what is edible. I also know you can capture the pollen in a bag and use it in pancake mixes for a unique flavor. I did it with my grandmother a couple of times.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #482 of 526

Yes,

 

 

There are 5 edible parts to this plant. If you gently pull the stalk out and cook it, you will be surprised to see it tastes alot like cucumber.

Not far is an island ( ten minutes from work)  where I see many people cutting it down to use.

It reminds me of that show about the man who can survive off the land on whatever "things" he stumbles upon.

 

The native American indians here still use it in their home remedies and crafts.

 

Well Gunnar, your up for the next question.

 

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #483 of 526

I have no questions at this time

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #484 of 526

frizbee, 

although i'm not a fan of using aluminum when it can be avoided, they do have small aluminum ramekins, that would most probably work for you..

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #485 of 526

This is a good little byte of trivia. . .

 

What is the only meat that is not restricted by any faith/religon?

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #486 of 526

Chicken?

 

Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
Reply
post #487 of 526

hot dogs!...nah, just kidding! if its chicken, wouldn't it include all poultry? chicken seems too easy, so i'll guess either rattlesnake or gator...

joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

Reply
post #488 of 526

Soylent Green.

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #489 of 526

IT'S PEOPLE!!!!!!

post #490 of 526


Lamb
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by trooper View Post

This is a good little byte of trivia. . .

 

What is the only meat that is not restricted by any faith/religon?

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #491 of 526

I hear that Mary restricts lamb. But only the little ones, with white fleece

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #492 of 526

Jews or Muslims restrict the use of chicken in that it must be Koshered. (edit note........that Is if they keep the faith...)

post #493 of 526

Mary had a little lamb, and the Doctors fainted. !!

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

Reply
post #494 of 526
Thread Starter 

OK here's a question.  You need to ask a question after you answer though. 

 

Are sardines from Sardinia?

post #495 of 526

YES, Sardines were named after the Mediterranean island of Sardinia, where they once lived in abundance.

 

 

(?) I asked a question about "what is a "laser" knife?". I was given a decent answer about what makes a knife a "laser" knife. That was all well and good. I asked if someone could put up a pic of a popular "laser" knife. Again, I was given that descriptive answer saying that "any" knife fitting the description is a "laser" knife. Swell. I'll ask again, but w/ some a qualification to maybe make it easier. Many of you should probably know that the knives I use are "Chicago Cutlery". I know, LOL @ Me. Anyway. Can someone give me a specific brand AND pic of a "laser" knife that I could consider using to bring me into this Japanese knife world? Thanks In Advance for your helpful replies. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #496 of 526

Quote:

Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

(?) I asked a question about "what is a "laser" knife?". I was given a decent answer about what makes a knife a "laser" knife. That was all well and good. I asked if someone could put up a pic of a popular "laser" knife. Again, I was given that descriptive answer saying that "any" knife fitting the description is a "laser" knife. Swell. I'll ask again, but w/ some a qualification to maybe make it easier. Many of you should probably know that the knives I use are "Chicago Cutlery". I know, LOL @ Me. Anyway. Can someone give me a specific brand AND pic of a "laser" knife that I could consider using to bring me into this Japanese knife world? Thanks In Advance for your helpful replies. 

Top this with your pathetic and dull Japanese junk knives . . .

Laser_Knife_1.jpgLaser_Knife_2.jpg

 

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #497 of 526

TY Trooper, but I don't know what I'm looking at. Now I could absolutely be wrong, but I don't see an edge on that knife. It looks flat to me. 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #498 of 526

I think due to the angle of the photo the "flat" area your seeing "is" the edge of the knife... if so, that is a serious edge.

 

 

ps: that's a old school knife from the looks of it

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
post #499 of 526

Quote:

Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

TY Trooper, but I don't know what I'm looking at. Now I could absolutely be wrong, but I don't see an edge on that knife. It looks flat to me. 


That's my "laser knife" man... That's the ultra-keen, 2mm-wide edge. Awesome, right?

 

I have two of these, one really heavy (3mm wide spine?) butcher's knife and an identical one that is about 2mm wide.

They were so rusty and pitted, and sharpened on God knows what - that the edge and tips were just horrible.

 

An old knife is a lot like a broken heart - It can live a hard life and seem almost worthless until someone sees the value in what it really is, and takes the time to make it new again.

 

 

 

 

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #500 of 526
Thread Starter 


 

Originally Posted by trooper View Post

 

An old knife is a lot like a broken heart - It can live a hard life and seem almost worthless until someone sees the value in what it really is, and takes the time to make it new again.

 


That brought a tear to my eye.

post #501 of 526


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

YES, Sardines were named after the Mediterranean island of Sardinia, where they once lived in abundance.

 

Wow, I had no idea. Thanks for the info.

post #502 of 526

Thanks for the  info Trooper, (someone will bring back that blade to life) ..........we need a question.....

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(165 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #503 of 526

why do so many cooks/chefs here refer to cooking with au jus?

Doesnt that mean with with jus?

 

shouldnt you just say I used the jus?

just wondering as it drives me nuts as so many of you are school trained professionals.let me know if I am wrong.

thanks patty pan

post #504 of 526

YES, pattypan, I believe you are correct. I concur with your observation. 

 

Au jus is French for "with [it's own] juice"; jus is the juice itself. In the English language (as spoken by Americans), "au jus" is often used to mean "broth" (jus) instead of "with broth". Let's just say, in my opinion, that many American chefs have just become a little sloppy with their culinary terms. (I said "many", not meaning "ALL", so don't get angry with me.) 

 

I'll try this (?) thing again. Can someone put up a pic, or even just name me a model or brand of a good "entry level", "starter grade", "beginner" laser knife that won't cost me a mortgage payment please? Thanks In Advance for your replies. 

 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #505 of 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meffy View Post

I don't watch the show so I can't say (and won't pose a question) but I'll venture that the one containing the most iron was Bender B. Rodríguez.


I'll ask a question then. What's the best type of coffee bean to use for a good latte?

post #506 of 526

"Latte" is a coffee drink made with espresso and steamed milk. It's an Italian drink, so use a good Italian espresso roast bean. In French it's café au lait, in Spanish it's café con leche and in Portuguese café com leite. Espresso is not a specific bean or roast level; it is a coffee brewing method. Any bean or roasting level can be used to produce authentic espresso and different beans have unique flavor profiles lending themselves to different roasting levels and styles. For example, in Southern Italy, a darker roast is generally preferred; but farther north, the trend moves toward lighter roasts.

 

Blah, blah, blah .......... everything I just said ......................... pick what you like, and make your drink. As long as it's a tasty high-quality been, finely ground for espresso, properly packed into a cup hooked up to a professional machine, blasted with nicely pressurized steam ... and then served with steamed real milk ..... you'll be just fine. 

200px-Espresso_and_napolitains.jpg 250px-A_cup_of_chai.JPG 200px-Caffèllatte_as_being_served_at_Kaffebrenneriet_Torshov%2C_Oslo%2C_Norway_2_600x600_100KB.jpg

 

我將再试一次這件問題事。 能某人举起圖片,甚至名字我一個好入口水平的模型或品牌,起始者等级,初學者不會請花費我抵押付款的激光刀子? 事先感謝您的回復。

 

私はこの質問事をもう一度試す。 設置される誰か映像、また更にちょうど名前は私よいエントリーレベルのモデルかブランド、始動機の等級、私に不動産のローンの支払いを要しない初心者レーザーのナイフできるか。 あなたの応答を前もってありがとう。

 

나는 이 질문 것을 재시도할 것이다. 올린 누군가 그림, 또는 다만 이름은 저 좋은 초보의 모형 또는 상표, 시동기 급료, 저에게 저당 납부금을 요하지 않을 초심자 레이저 칼 할 수 있는가? 당신의 대답을 위한 미리 감사합니다.

 

(Maybe now I get a response. LOL.)

 

 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #507 of 526


Or if you add seasoning to the fond and liquid left in a pan, then it is pan jus...  heheheh 

 

Hey, Ice, here are some suggestions for your budget laser knife (IMHO) but BDL seems to be missing, so I hope this helps...

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KAGAYAKI.html The KG-7 and KG-8 are on sale. (240 and 270mm Gyuto) Both Stainless

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/FKHSeries.html The FKH-10 Carbon Sujihiki - You want your meat-only knife to be carbon for sure. It doesn't touch acid (fruit), but has to slice/trim fat, silver skin, muscle fiber, you want carbon. The FKH-7 Gyuto is only 88 dollars, but is also carbon.

 

http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/HKSSeries.html These are cool, I may get a gyuto and a slicer from this set. I need another suji anyway.

 

Hope that helps.

 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

YES, pattypan, I believe you are correct. I concur with your observation. 

 

Au jus is French for "with [it's own] juice"; jus is the juice itself. In the English language (as spoken by Americans), "au jus" is often used to mean "broth" (jus) instead of "with broth". Let's just say, in my opinion, that many American chefs have just become a little sloppy with their culinary terms. (I said "many", not meaning "ALL", so don't get angry with me.) 

 

I'll try this (?) thing again. Can someone put up a pic, or even just name me a model or brand of a good "entry level", "starter grade", "beginner" laser knife that won't cost me a mortgage payment please? Thanks In Advance for your replies. 

 

 



 

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #508 of 526

MY GOODNESS!!!

 

Have you ever seen something/anything this beautiful?!?

200812-hp-milk-chocolate-cremoso.jpg

 

Milk-Chocolate Cremoso with Espresso Parfait

(a silky pudding-like dish drizzled with olive oil)

 

 

Thanks for the lasers Trooper. I think I'll be going in a different direction though. For some goofy reason I'm interested in ceramic knives. Yeah, I know, heresy. Anyway, thank you again. now I get the laser idea. Just really good knives that are surgically sharp. 

 

Here's another question. Can someone maybe put up a vocabulary list explaining the definitions of names and different uses for Japanese knives. TIA for your help. 

 

 

 

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply

"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music."

I'm not sayin', I'm just sayin'.

Reply
post #509 of 526

Common Japanese Knives:

 

Nakiri - used mostly for vegetables, looks like a small cleaver, but not as heavy and tough as a Western meat cleaver

 

Santoku is a sheep's foot version of the Nakiri, but more robust. This is usually the first and only "Eastern-style" knife people migrate to from a standard chef's knife.

 

Gyotu - Chef Knives for people more into knives : )

 

Deba is a heavy-duty knife used mainly for fish

 

Sujihiki is close to what a Western/German Slicer is

 

Yanagi Ba is kind of like a rigid slicer, mainly used for Sashimi (resentation cuts of fish)

 

Petty is also known as a Utility Knife

 

Tako Hiki is a thin version of the Yanagi, but with a square tip instead of a pointy one, and is usually thinner than a Yanagi. Similar to a filet knife but not really comparable to one.

 

There are a ton of other knives but these are the most common ones used outside of APAC

 

 

 

 

Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
Do or Do not - There is no Try. - Yoda
Reply
post #510 of 526
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post For some goofy reason I'm interested in ceramic knives. Yeah, I know, heresy.

 

 

 



it's not so much heresy as foolishness, take that lightly. It's just that every cook that I ever worked with that had a ceramic knife would show it to me and it had a busted tip and was dull. they are brittle and apparently difficult to sharpen once they become dull, although I am no expert.

"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Ask the person below