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Foie Gras Powder

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hey there all...
Does anyone know anything about making "Foie Gras Powder" Either from Fresh Goose Liver or Pate de foie gras. Please share some tips and tricks. I am a bit desperate to make some.
Always have a unique character like SALT...
It's presence is not felt ....
but its ABSENCE makes all things TASTELESS?
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Always have a unique character like SALT...
It's presence is not felt ....
but its ABSENCE makes all things TASTELESS?
Reply
post #2 of 11
Yes I think you are crazy. I've never heard of it. Is it a molecular gastronomy technique?
post #3 of 11
Is this for real??? or do you powder the duck.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #4 of 11
There is a site that speaks about this :
http://nrnfoodwriter.blogspot.com/20...ennis-foy.html

"So sprinkled on his foie gras terrine is a foie gras powder made by mixing foe gras fat with what the chef called tapioca maltodextrin starch. Tapioca is an extremely absorbent starch, and maltodextrin is very much loved by pastry chefs because of its ability to stand up to humidity. So the foie gras, when mixed with this particular starch, is dried into a powder."

If you do find "exactly" what you are looking for, please let me know, I am curious.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 11
i worked at a place where we messed around with chemicals and had made a nutella powder...its been a while but i think this is the gist of it... the chemical (tapioca maltodextrin in a definite possibility), is combined with high fat items (melted down foie, nutella, peanut butter..you get the picture) then blitzed in a food processor and by the magic of science turns to a powder before your very eyes...check out WillPowder - Specialty Powders and Spices from Chef Will Goldfarb ...they have a ton of chemicals if you are interested in playing around with them..
post #6 of 11
Tap Malto (which has been stated above is a modified food starch) is definitely the surest way to go, since foie gras consists mostly of fat. Thing is that foie is relatively subtle in flavour compared to many of the other oils that are usually powderized (truffle, olive, brown butter) and it requires quite a lot of tap malto to get it to a fine powder so you should check to see if it's giving you the flavour. Also tap malto lightens the colour of the food so if you want it to be darker you may need to find a different way.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #7 of 11

I believe that the tapioca-maltodexterin method (60%fat-40%enzyme) will give you the powder result, but if you want great flavor you should cure your foie , make a mousseline and add transglutaminase in the process...it's another (expensive) enzyme that is used to create the protein noodles that is seen in molecular cooking, i.e. fish noodles. The reason I mention it is because it binds together the amino acids glutamine and lysine and those acids are what really develops flavor. MSG=amino acid. Your powder should turn out much more flavorful and smooth.

post #8 of 11
Maltodextrine, flur de sel, rendered fat from the foie gras and a robot coup are all you will need. Start by rendering the fat from the foie( I suggest using a lower grade like frozen pre sliced pieces since I just toss the liver after rendering it because it is at this time over cooked ). Allow the fat to cool to less than 100*f and put aside. Next you will need the maltodextrine. Put it in your food processor along with the salt and pulse it until incorporated. Next start to stream the fat into the powder mixture , the ratio will be around 10-1 and of you get clumps, add more dextrine. I like to use as much fat as possible and still keep a light texture, this way you can maximize the flavor. This can also be done with just about any otherfatand I am a huge fan of using sausage fat or duck fat. Sorry I don't have a precise recipe for you but I hope that explaining the process helps. It is simple to make and it adds a nice touch to a plate description. Bill Baker, sous chef Olde Pink House. Savannah,Ga
post #9 of 11
Tapioca maltodextrin is the way to go. Just make sure the flavor and fat content are present before adding the maltodextrin as it will leave an uncomfortable dehydrated mouthfeel if your fat content is lacking. This also seems to magnify the presence (or lack there of) of salty and sweet flavors. Try to bust out the good ol' two decimal point digital scale and accurately track your ratio of product to tapioca maltodextrin as you dial in the right texture and mouth feel ( keep something on hand to rehydrate and cleanse your palette, this stuff will give you the worst dry mouth if your fat content is off). An 50g packet of Tapioca Maltodextrin is under 15$ and more than enough to use in a medium size restaurant kitchen for those slow days.
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eric Galloway View Post
 

I believe that the tapioca-maltodexterin method (60%fat-40%enzyme) will give you the powder result, but if you want great flavor you should cure your foie , make a mousseline and add transglutaminase in the process...it's another (expensive) enzyme that is used to create the protein noodles that is seen in molecular cooking, i.e. fish noodles. The reason I mention it is because it binds together the amino acids glutamine and lysine and those acids are what really develops flavor. MSG=amino acid. Your powder should turn out much more flavorful and smooth.

 

As far as I am aware, meat glue has no flavor development properties. It is true that is binds the two amino acids together, but where did you learn that meat glue adds flavor? It is also true that MSG is also an amino acid, but meat glue and MSG are two separate things. 

 

Again, TG's purpose it to bind protein, not develop flavor. It seems that adding TG to a foie mousse or powder would be a huge waste of TG. Do you have a source on this? 

 

And yes, the tapioca maltrodextrin is the way to go to make an edible powder from different types of fat. Use with care--it can easily become gimmicky and silly when not used right. But it can also be a great way to use up leftover foie cooking fat and or scraps from butchering. 

post #11 of 11
Hi,
Best result and simple fine pure foie gras powder:
Cut 1/2 cm slices of foie gras, add salt (if raw unseasoned lobe), "cook" the slices into liquid nitrogen ( fully submerged), then strait out off nitro blend in a hand cuter ( mini hand robocoupe) .
You will end up with a superfine chiles foie gras powder.
You can fully cover a tartar, beef, scallop...
Hope this help.
B
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