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Collapsing Cake - Update

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
So, I made the almond cake again today following BDL's guidelines :
  • Don't over beat the batter
  • Lower oven temperature from 350 to 300 degrees (convection bake)
  • Bain Marie

Mixed results.
When I mixed the almond paste into the creamed butter & sugar the speed was too low to break it up thoroughly so there were little bits in the batter. It didn't seem to affect the final product but I'd prefer it to blend a bit better.
The cake rose as before but when it settled it did so evenly rather than collapsing in the middle so that's a good thing.
The outer edge of the cake didn't set up so next time I'll follow the same steps, sans bain marie.
post #2 of 7
Is this a frangipane? If so, loose the bain marie, make sure you are using cake flour and make sure you hit a solid 200 degree F center temperature to insure thorough baking.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
No M Brown, it's not a frangipane, it's an almond cake. I was having trouble with the cake collapsing and the team offered some advice which I'm working through.

Thank you
post #4 of 7
I'll be very suprised if BDL's advice worked (for none-cheesecakes), but thanks for the update, its good that you're experimenting... keep us updated.
post #5 of 7
Can you lose the convection? Maybe the heat of the convection is causing the cake to rise too quickly, then fall before it's baked through.
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post #6 of 7
Well, you want the almond paste well incorporated. I'm not sure what the deal is specifically with yours -- you may be using a very stiff paste, or it could be a little old, or it just required a little more beating, or...

Ultimately, the difference we're looking for, whether you mix by machine or hand, is the difference you'd find between French and baloon whisks. I.e, you want well mixed but no air.

Try beating a little more but at a lower spped if possible -- just until you're comfortable the almond paste is smoothly incorporated. Then, after you've poured the batter into the tin, pick it up a few times and "bump" it onto the counter to knock down any bubbles -- the same way a good barista knocks the bubbles out of steamed milk. Alternatively, try beating by hand, actually using a heavy duty French whixk. A good French whisk can persuade the heck out of the most recalcitrant ingredients, sauces and batters.

A VGT.

Sounds like a winner.

BDL

PS. A heavy wired, French whisk (long and pear shaped) is one of the most useful tools in your baterie de cuisine -- especially for baking and saucing. It's the go-to tool for thorough mixing without adding too much air. If you're not buying from a restaurant supply it can take some looking to find one with heavy enough wire (not a "piano whisk") AND a comfortable handle. I think WS sells a pretty good and reasonably priced French whisk online. Props to them.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
All, as ever, thanks for the feedback and support.

BDL, in fact I do have a French whisk in my baterie de cusine. I've always used the KA because I thought it was more efficient!!
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