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Cover dough with plastic wrap, or just a towel?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
When I'm letting dough rise, do I cover the bowl with plastic wrap or a towel?

I tried this master dough recipe twice, and the dough doesn't rise:
Deep-dish pizza recipe: a taste of Chicago, a natural for inauguration parties | Recipe Exchange | STLtoday
First, I'm pretty sure that's not the original recipe, second are you really suppose to cover it with plastic wrap?

The second time I made it I was very precise with my measurements, and even checked the temperature of the water before adding the yeast (which I just bought).

I'm thinking of substituting the oil with water, will that help any?

TIA
post #2 of 8
Maybe that's why Giordano's and Gino's East have better pie.:lol:
A lot of the deep dish or stuffed Chicago pie doesn't have a crust that rises much like a traditional pizza dough.
If you are not getting any rise at all are are checking the water temp if you are using active dry yeast? If it's too hot it will kill the yeast. You may want to just try using instant or rapid rise yeast.
I doubt replacing the oil will matter much. I use oil in some of my bread and pizza dough.
I spray the dough with non stick spray and cover the lid of the container with plastic leaving room for the dough to rise. If you use a towel make sure it is a smooth one like a bar towel or it will stick to the dough.
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #3 of 8
The recipe specifies more than enough yeast to raise the amount of flour a great deal -- like 3 or 4 times the volume -- in the 2 hour counter-top period specified. Similarly you ought to get pretty close to doubling the volume -- one way or another -- in the refrigerator.

As a matter of fact, I thought the amount of yeast in the recipe was a bit overboard. Also, not enough oil. Not that what I think matters.

Where the problem is, I have no idea. Considering how careful you say you were to follow the recipe exactly, you've either radically misunderstood an instruction or your new yeast is bunk. Dead yeast happens.

I second DuckFat's recommendation of "instant yeast," it's a lot more consistent than any other type -- and much cheaper in the long run too. Furthermore, you don't need to proof it in warm water before mixing it in.

BDL
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Thanks! The yeast I used I bought at the same time, and it was on sale, so it may have been bunk.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Also, does the plastic or towel make a difference? Does air need to get to the dough?

TIA
post #6 of 8
Plastic is more convenient, and usually works a little (but not much) better. If there's room for the dough to rise, there's more than plenty of air for the yeast spoors to work their magic. The process is pretty anaerobic, anyway.

BDL
post #7 of 8
Ditto what BDL said. Plastic is just more convienient. There is no reason to use active dry yeast for pizza dough like this or no knead breads IMO. I still don't see a traditional dough recipe like this working for Chicago deep dish pie. It's just the wrong texture. Chicago deep dish dough doesn't have much rise to it and it's pretty dense.
Next you need to find a recipe for Lou Malnati's sausage.
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #8 of 8
Plastic isn't just more convenient, for me its a necessity. In my dry climate, towels won't prevernt the dough from drying out and forming a crust during the rising process.

However, I have a few large (tall) almost clear plastic tubs I like to proof dough in as they are easy to guage doubling in and have a tight fitting lid. Of course I can't use the lid tight but it does well enough resting loosely on top of the tub.

Exceptions are my preferred focaccia dough that is best left flat and wide as it's just too wet a dough to deal with reasonably in the traditional ways.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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