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Turkey bags

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I recently overheard a conversation about cooking turkeys. They were talking about using a cooking bag. Any opinions? I am pretty coventional, I just usually roast with seasoning under the skin and bacon over the breast. They were saying the turkey cooks faster.
post #2 of 18
I don't use them myself but I know many who use those large bags to brine the turkey before hand.

Bacon eh? Do you slice the breast with the bacon on it or do you remove the bacon so that the skin crisps at the end? May have to try that.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
The bacon usually cooks up crisp . Once it is crisp I take it off. If I don't use bacon I start out with a wet cheesecloth over the breast tented with foil and remove the last hour.
post #4 of 18
I've eaten turkey roasted in a bag. It was awful. I imagined that it would come out like boiled or steamed turkey, and i was right. Bla. I didn't make it, so i can't vouch for the cooking method, but for me one of the best things about roast turkey is the skin and the crispiness of it (boiled poultry skin - well does it get any worse than that?) so i really don;t get why anyone would do it in a bag which pretty much precludes any possibility of browning, i would think.
I roast my turkey in a very hot oven for the entire time, with just a tent of foil on it if it looks like it might burn, or on the tops of the legs if they seem to be getting dry. It comes out really juicy inside and crispy outside. I think they invented the bags to be able to sell something else, not out of any real advantage.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 18
Thread Starter 
Siduri, You said you use a hot oven for your turkey. I have always cooked my turkey between 325 and 350. So how hot do you go?
post #6 of 18
The trick to using a bag is to remove it, and let the turkey finish in an open oven. That will brown and crisp up the skin.

I don't know many people, however, who have tried the bags who use them a second time.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 18
call us weird but my family rubs a liberal dose of butter on a cut brown shopping bag, place in the oven at 350 for the right number of hours and voila. perfect brown turkey with no issues.

cause the bag is open on the leg end not the breast end it doesn't just steam the turkey but does seem to help moisture stay in the breast. Buttering the bag thoroughly keeps it from bursting into flame and kinda bastes the turkey a bit. haven't tried sealing it up in one of those giant plastic roasting bags.

and before anyone says anything, no, noone (friends or family) has had any issues with ink flavor (usually thats the panel you cut out) or any other chemical issues from using a plain brown shopping bag.
"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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"In those days spirits were brave, the stakes were high, men were real men, women were real women, and small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri were real small furry creatures from Alpha Centauri. "
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post #8 of 18
My mother in law always uses a bag. I don't know her specific technique but she gets color but not crisping from the bag. It's not a great bird but it's not objectionable.
post #9 of 18
I'm in favour of bags, then finishing it as per what KYH says. One trick is to put some flour into the bad with whatever herbs/spices you fancy first, shake bag around to mix, then bung your bird in.

Always works for me with either turkey or chicken, as long as you take it out and crank the heat up to brown. BTW, you get a good amount of juice for the gravy this way.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #10 of 18
I usually cook it at at least 450, often even hotter.
I used to have an oven that had a broken thermostat and there were no replacement parts, so the repairman just replaced the thermostat with an on/off switch. It got VERY hot. I had to put smething in the door to keep it open to bake cakes, etc, but discovered that practically everything that is not baking benefits from high heat. Of course, you have to watch it carefully.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #11 of 18
>BTW, you get a good amount of juice for the gravy this way.<

Just be careful, as it usually pours out the opposite way u want it to.

done one them for chicken. Out of interest i bought a couple in US supermarket with flavouring in the bag. not bad actually
Did another for pork chops too. Not something ill repeat.
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #12 of 18
You are spot on with the juices - good tip. I generally cut the bag over the pan and tip it, then get the juices into a saucepan, crisp up the bird while finishing off the rest of the main and making the gravy.

Can't imagine pork chops in one - IMO they need direct heat, in a pan, or at least started in a pan, unless they are being braised/stewed.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #13 of 18
That, and a braising liquid that brings some flavor to the party.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #14 of 18
For me, I don't even use turkey bag when frying a turkey. I directly use the turkey fryer. And it taste crispy and delicious. You can cook turkey with the use of turkey fryer directly. Just try it.

Turkey Deep Fryer - Bayou Classic 3066a 30-Quart Outdoor Turkey Fryer Kit
post #15 of 18
My wife's older sister uses turkey bags. The bird does come out moist and tender, or soggy and mushy depending on your personal preferences. I myself opt for the un-steamed poultry.


mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #16 of 18
I think turkey bags were designed for Irish American women (like my mother) who seems to only know two types of meat. Over cooked and VERY over cooked. At least you wouldn't need a entire glass of liquid just to choke the turkey down. I only ate dark meat as a child, I had no idea that white meat (and dear god don't get me started on her pork chops) didn't have to have the mouth feel of a paper towel. Luckily she made gravy.

My wife and I saw an add for those the other night and the first thing we said was how awful those would be.

We (well she) starts the turkey at about 475 to crisp it up, and then lowers the temperature after to finish the cooking. We also brine it over night prior to cooking.

It always comes out perfect. I'd give you more details but she the turkey cooker, though I'm sure someone here or online searches would give you the full recipes for a brine and the cooking method.
post #17 of 18
I was actually thinking about using a cooking bag for my turkey this year but I for lack of willingness to stray from my usual rosting techniquie i'm not going to use it.
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
I have brined before many times. I don't even know why I was wondering about the bag thing. My turkey is good and is moist, however you are the second person who has told me they cook at least part of the time at a high temp. I have always cooked my turkeys at 325-350 . You know, that's the way my mom always did it.
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