or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

worms in fish??? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
lol Siduri....fair enough :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
Reply

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #32 of 44
I'll pass. :lol:
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
Reply
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
Reply
post #33 of 44
Very common here in Florida also in Cod, besides all fish mentioned above. Many are found in warmer water fish usually, Cod is exception. I cut 200 to 300 fresh fish per week and can tell you that they put their heads right up out of the flesh to see what is disturbing them.
This is why Cruise ships by law have to freeze all fish for 72 hours before use. Heat of broiler usually draws them out and will kill them. Better yet about 6 weeks ago I gutted and cleaned a chilean sea bass and low and behold a hair brush was in its stomach (I never thought they brushed their hair ). I have also found other interesting things. Worms are least of problem trust me . Meat is worse.:chef:
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #34 of 44
Ah yes horn -worms in tomatoes. Sometime they are almost as big as the tomato. They look like baby dragons.
CHEFED
Reply
CHEFED
Reply
post #35 of 44
"I gutted and cleaned a chilean sea bass and low and behold a hair brush was in its stomach (I never thought they brushed their hair ). I have also found other interesting things. Worms are least of problem trust me ."

I guess I blocked it out but reading this reminded me of the times I found cigarette butts and condoms in squid. For the record not the same squid, but i can't help but hope that they were related.

--Al
post #36 of 44
Fish flesh decompose so quickly that unless you can eat it immediately after being caught(exception than norm) it's better to have them frozen on-vessel and buy it frozen anyways.

Dead fish and crustaceans don't store well unless deep frozen immediately.

Raw fish may give a sense of freshness, but they're often LESS fresh.

I've never figured out why some stores sell thawed fish that reads "previously frozen". They basically just ruined it by defrosting it. Every minute that's on the shelf in defrosted state is advancing decomposition and there was no merit in defrosting it just to be displayed on shelves.
post #37 of 44
My guess is that a whole fish, or side, is brought in frozen then broken down for resale.

--Al
post #38 of 44
I see this happening with shrimps too.
post #39 of 44
This is the kind of thing that shocks me. I know, fish play host to all kinds of horrible things, and unlike DC Sunshine I don't accept that they're good eats like witchetty grubs. But I just got back from a year in Japan, and the basic thing is that the customers there just won't tolerate this kind of thing, so they don't have to.

If it's marked "raw," it's raw, not previously frozen, but caught, cut, and ready to roll.

If it's marked "for making sashimi," it's ready to cut up and eat just as it is.

If it's frozen, it's frozen, not thawed out and degrading. Some of this is marked "for making sashimi," some isn't. When you do see seafood labeled "previously frozen" it was still frozen solid yesterday and will be discarded tonight after closing. You pay extra for this, just a little bit, because it's a convenience item.

At many markets, there is the designation "for cooking," which means that they don't think you should eat it raw. At those markets, "for making sashimi" means that it's cut appropriately, not that it is any safer than stuff with no designation.

Similarly, some markets label certain eggs "for eating raw." These eggs do not have salmonella in them. And if you look around a bit, you can find high-end markets that sell chicken which is salmonella-free and suitable for eating raw should you wish to do so.

But the fish is cheaper than in Boston. Eggs are a little pricier.

How do they do this? By intensive and serious inspection systems, backed up by a customer base that simply will not tolerate parasite-laden or infected foods. It helps, of course, that they also don't have a ludicrous liability system under which anyone who does get sick can sue for millions, so there is no harm in labeling something for raw use when you're 99.999% sure it's okay -- you won't get destroyed if you make a mistake just once.

You'll perhaps be interested to know that because of all these factors, salmon is very rarely served raw in Japan. It's commonly infested, and the only way to serve it "raw" is to freeze it solid for a while, which screws up the texture.
post #40 of 44
Thank you for that info Chris,

So the salmon that we are getting here, marked "fresh" would we need to take the sme precaution ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(163 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #41 of 44
Howdy, its been a long time since I logged in. Nice to be back again. How are you guys. Anyway its kinda odd talking about worms on fish. I love fish but I'll pass for a couple of days.. :(
post #42 of 44
Welcome back Nichole.

Doc
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
Reply
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
Reply
post #43 of 44
Thread Starter 
Apparently it is very easy to test for trichinosis in pigs, and yet apparently for some reason they don;t do this in the States. I had made roast pork for my friend and doctor (she's also american) and it was a little pink. I said "uh oh, better put it back in the oven" and she said "Naa, all the pork in italy is tested, i learned it in medical school. They couldn;t afford not to with the extensive use of raw pork products like prosciutto"

The thing about the fish worms that most bothered me is that I never heard of it nor saw them, and am surprised that with all the cookbook reading i do, it never came up.
My daughter, the vegetarian, however, told me SHE knew about it, because all the vegetarian literature talks about it.
She never liked meat or fish anyway, so that was not the deciding factor.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #44 of 44

Very common

Yes, there are worms in fish and they are very common. They are Anisakis for the most part which die in the cooking process so they wouldn't be of any harm unless you eat the fish raw.

Being from Spain, I am very used to this because you go to a fishmonger who cleans the fish in front of you but many times they leave the belly side of the fish intact.
I remember my mom cleaning the belly of the worms in order to cook it.

I say take the belly of the fish out completely and you will reduce the risk of having worms by 90%.

Again if you don't see them and cook the fish to the correct temperature you shouldn't be concerned.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking

Gear mentioned in this thread: