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Non BBQ Beef Brisket

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hi All,

I was given a HUGE beef brisket. My husband dosent care for most BBQ recipes and due to another family member we cannot have anything really hot. I have searched the forums and have seen mostly things that fall into those catagories. Does anyone have a really good brisket recipe that they think might work??

Thanks

Pam
post #2 of 19
I'd be tempted to pot roast, if you can roll and tie it perhaps in several pieces if it's really big. Doesn't have to be spicy, just long slow cooking over carrots, celery ad onion, couple of bay leaves, add half a bottle of red wine (or more if you like). Usual pot roast method.

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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #3 of 19
I was all grown up before I learned there was such a thing as BBQ brisket. :p

Here's the brisket I grew up on:

Season the meat on both sides with salt (and pepper, if you want). Place it fat-side up in a roasting pan. Cover it with LOTS and LOTS of sliced onions, and sliced garlic too if you like. Sprinkle sweet paprika all over. Cover the pan (with heavy foil if it doesn't have a lid) and cook in a 325 degree F oven for a few hours, until a fork easily pierces the meat. If it all looks pale after a couple of hours, remove the cover to let everything brown. Let it sit on a cutting board for a little while before slicing. Skim the fat off the juices in the pan.

That's it. Very simple, but if it's good meat, it will be delicious.

You can always add other stuff if you like, such as a can or two of chopped tomatoes, some sliced carrots, a few peeled chunks of potato and/or turnip. But the basic brisket is fine by itself.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 19
Suzanne's version minus the paprika + loads of thyme....so salt, pepper, thyme and loads of peeled sliced onions.
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post #5 of 19
If you have a crock pot, lay down a mirepoix as veggie bed. Then place your brisket in the crock, with a couple of cups of a good red wine. Add some thyme and rosemary, and the top off with H2O until the brisket is covered. Cook low and slow for 10 -12 hours.
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
Suzanne and shroomgirl that sounds like that might go over big in this house.

My first thought was a my old standby crock pot but this thing is 2 -3 ft long! i think i can stuff it into my big roaster tho.

pretty thick too so rolling it would be out too.

Thanks for the feedback everyone!
post #7 of 19
Is that thing a brisket of dinosaur?! hehe. Enjoy it however you do it.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
probably water buffalo LOL
post #9 of 19
Workd at a deli where 'mom' made this for all the Jewish holidays - the link is the closest I could find to the way she made it. You can easily sub out tomato sauce for the chili sauce. It was heavenly!

Aunt Jinny's Tangy Beef Brisket - All Recipes
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post #10 of 19
Brontosaurus Brisket. Let's do it! :roll:
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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post #11 of 19
Sounds like a simplified version of sauerbraten, without the sauer. Since bottled chili sauce (think Heinz) isn't really spicy, that might work as is, just ramped up for a brontosaurus brisket. :lol:

A couple of my cousins do a sweet-and-sour brisket, probably not that different. They add raisins that puff up in the juices, and maybe some jelly and vinegar. It's not really my thing, so I never asked exactly how they do it. Just so long as the sauce isn't equal parts of Heinz Chili Sauce and Welch's Grape Jelly :eek: (a longstanding family horror story), it's okay.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #12 of 19
I want to hear the nightmare :roll:
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #13 of 19
Lol - Isn't there an old 'appetizer' recipe for meatballs in chili sauce/grape jelly?:crazy:
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post #14 of 19
Cut off about 6 inches of it and trim the fat cap from your short piece. Mince the fat and butterfly the meat. Mix some of the fat with garlic, onions, carrots, celery(garlic soffritto) until it's sticky, like fatty sausage. Rub the cut side with the fat/soffritto mix and roll it up loosely. Tie with butcher's twine and treat it like any other roast. You can also bard the meat log with bacon and add even more flavor.

Also, if it's not thin enough to roll after butterflying, make two cuts instead of one.

Also also(?), if you didn't know, to butterfly the meat, lay it flat and cut, right in the middle from top to bottom, from one edge to the other until the meat opens like a book(Don't cut all the way through or you'll have a hard time getting it tied.). If you need to make two cuts, make them in opposite directions 1/3 of the way from the top and the same distance from the bottom.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
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post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
with all these wonderful suggestions I will have to see if i can get another one given to me !!! LOL
post #16 of 19
Thread Starter 
just wanted to pop back in and say thanks to all. It seems funny at my age I never cooked one of these before but I guess there is a first time for everything. I finally got up the courage to give it a whirl tho.

I decided to go long low and simple. I used simple spices and garlic and coooked it for several hours on a fairly low temp. I have to say it came out lovely. Everyone enjoyed it very much as well as the left overs the next night with a lovely gravey.

This cut was so huge i even froze some of the cooked meat to use in gravey over noodles or potato for a quick meal later down the road.

Thank you so much to everyone who helped out with suggestions. I just love this web site!!

Pam:peace:
post #17 of 19
Thanks for reporting back! It's great to know things worked out.

And sometime, you'll have the answer to someone else's question. :talk:


As for the grape jelly/chili sauce thing -- one of my mother's sisters tried it as a sauce for stuffed cabbage (leaves filled with chopped beef and rice and onions, normally cooked in chopped tomatoes). All 4 of the other sisters made it without waiting to find out what her family's reaction had been. Everyone HATED it. (It might work for appetizer meatballs, yes, but not with that combination, and not for a whole main course. :eek:) But this being the 1950s, and all of the sisters having grown up during the Depression, we all had to eat the whole pot of the stuff. Man, that was tough. :mad:
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #18 of 19
Here's what I did in the rain yesterday...

6 pound brisket, trimmed and cut in half.
Dry rubbed w/secret mix, wrapped and refrigerated for 7 hours.
Browned, removed,
Sweated onions,
Added a couple of TBS Flour
Returned (on top of onions),
Covered with tomato paste, covered, into 375º oven for 2 hours,
1 large can of plum tomatoes added,
returned w/o cover to 350º over for 2 more hours.
At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
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At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals.
www.kyleskitchen.net
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post #19 of 19
If possible see if someone you know has a smoker. Do that first its great. Ask BDL for his recipe he is the smoker king.
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