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Christmas breakfast

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
Folk get up at all sorts of times on Christmas morning and i want to have food they can pick at, rather than a formal breakfast.

There will be family and a friend from new york staying, and folk dropping in and out during the morning.

I wont be doing bacon. Uk is different to US and doesnt go crisp, it goes tough with the keeping.

I'll be doing Angus steak sausages, loads of them. i'll make breakfast muffins the night before n warm them. French toast and scrambled eggs dont keep, so they're off. Same with kidneys.

I thought about leaving a pile of bagels next to the toaster and cream cheese /jams/ smoked salmon in the fridge.

So I need some keepability ideas please. Usually it's just us and we survive on toast, sausages, chocolate and bucks fizz. That's not going to cut it this year... I need to impress...I also want it to look like it was no effort, even if it was.

BTW I reckon I've got a 2 1/2 hour window for feeding the morning masses so thats the keepability

Ps. I dont want to be up at the crack of a sparrows fart prepping this feast, so go easy chaps

Thanks in advance
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #2 of 17
Frittatas are your friend! :lol: You can make a bunch the day before, using different vegetables (or potatoes, as in a Spanish tortilla), chill, and serve them the next day at room temp, cut into wedges.

Or you can make one big bread pudding in a large baking pan the day before (with added vegs, too, if you like) and cut it into squares to serve. It too can be served at room temp or reheated part at a time.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 17
Bughut,

Fresh fruit platter or bowl of fruit salad

Home Fries

Ham and pineapple , cut and sliced, heat and serve....

Quiche, large or mini's

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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post #4 of 17
How about kedgeree, BH?

I usually do smoked salmon on thin brown bread and butter and Buck's fizz. Keeps us going until lunch which is usually about 3.00 pm (we then manage to 'miss' the Queen's speech!):roll:
post #5 of 17
A variety of muffins might be nice, with cream cheese, butter and/or jam on the side. Fresh fruit is always a winner, and chilled insulated servers filled with fruit juice would probably also be welcomed. If you're also fixing Christmas dinner, you'd probably want to minimize the work for breakfast. I hope it turns out well for you.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #6 of 17
My sister does a strata every Christmas morning. I usually have some fruit available and don't woryy much beyond that. It's a Holiday I take as the home cook. The big meal I do on Christmas Eve and dinner on the day itself is a reheating of leftovers.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
I knew you'd come up trumps, and so quick too.

Suzanne, you're right. Frittattas are my friend. Cant beleive i didnt think of it. Now bread pudding??? Are we talking about the same thing? How do you make yours?

Fresh fruit is a winner of course.Thanks petals and grace.

Ishbel, I would stick a kedgeree on in a minute if i thought it would keep. But it would be manhandled and not covered properly afterwards n be a dried up mess in an hour. I think I'll do it boxing day, or new year when its just us. Do you make it creamy or dry?
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #8 of 17
A coffee cake with a walnut, cinnamon sugar swirl in the middle and topping would be good with a nice cup of strong coffee.
post #9 of 17
Red Wine poached eggs over some tenderloin and a homemade english muffin?

just kiddin'

For me it's just a shitload of bacon and scrambled eggs, and some toast. I may spring for some good bread and some nice jams and such.

I third Suzannes frittatas though too.
post #10 of 17
Fruit compote made from dried apricots, apples, prunes, etc- whatever combo tickles your fancy. Side of greek yoghurt for dressing. Yum. My mum calls it "Gunk" :D Serve warm or cold, nicer made couple of days ahead.
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 17
BH - I like my kedgeree on the dry-ish side, rather than creamy.
post #12 of 17
Instead of fritatta or tortilla (Spanish firtatta), I'd go with quiche, as they may be made ahead, frozen and reheated on the morning of; and they're more luxurious too. To my mind fritattas are fine for a brunch, but making them intereferes too much with me enjoying a morning which is about more than entertaining.

Bagels and cream cheese yes, but make a jardiniere with shallots, peppers, capers, dill and parsley -- and beat it into your cheese with your food processor. You can do this a couple of days ahead -- the extra time will allow the flavors to marry.

Lox of some sort. Scottish smoked salmon is wonderful, but you might also consider gravlaks -- with the Kingdom's fattest salmon. It's another project you start a couple of days in advance and which doesn't require much work -- pretty much what you specified. The slicing which can be a bit tricky, but you can leave the lox on the board with a sharp knife and let each guest enjoy ruining his own. On the other hand, gravlaks holds very well (duh), and you can order whomever it is who owns the sharpest knife and the steadiest hand do the slicing in advance. Lay the sliced lox out on waxed paper (temporarily) barely overlapping, wrap in cling wrap and hold for as long as a week. Just remember to change the cling wrap every day.

Tomato salad Caprese (fresh mozzalrella, basil, best olive oil)

Several cheeses, olives, sliced onions, cole slaw, potato salad, herring in sour cream or chopped herring salad, marinated artichokes.

Salad of microgreens with two dressings on the side -- a vinaigrette and something creamy and retro like Green Goddess.

Shortbread, berries and clotted cream.

Several teas

Best Coffee

Freshly squeezed or squoze or squozen or squizzled orange juice

Screwdrivers, Bloody Marys and/or Ramos Fizz by the pitcher

BDL
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
I want to come to your house for christmas BDL!!!

I would never have thought of tarting up the creamcheese. I know that will be appreciated by all. And with the homemade gravadlaxnand smoked salmon, the pepper mill will be on overdrive. (my lot are addicted)

I see where ur going with the quiche, n I may do. But it's the one task my business put me off... I made sooo many, I scunnered myself with the blooming things. OOOH! theres another word for your slang bank... Scunnered :- Totally and utterly put off something. Or do you already have that one?

as far as carving the fish is concerned, I'll be doing it myself. I actually love slicing thin, cross slices of smoked salmon etc. My bendy knife hasn't had much use since college, but this is where it shines.

For cheese, I'm keeping it simple. A Scottish cheddar, and a mature Talegio. No Stilton. I'm keeping that for after dinner No extras either. They can just cut off chunks n enjoy with everything else(~Cant beleive I hadnt thought of cheese before either)

Sweet, I'm not sure. I think i'll stick with the muffins
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #14 of 17
"I dont want to be up at the crack of a sparrows fart" Never heard that one before, but I love it. Near about fell out of my chair. :lol:
"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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"J'aime cuisiner avec du vin, j'ai parfois même mettre dans les aliments je suis cuisson. ""Mi piace cucinare con il vino, talvolta ho persino messa nel cibo sto cottura. ""I enjoy cooking with wine, sometimes I even put it in the food I'm cooking." - Julia Child 
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post #15 of 17
Yes. No. Sort of.

Now that you've knocked the rust off, I remember "skunnert" from a class in middle English (so long ago it was darn near contemporary English at the time). But I had completely forgotten it until the kick in the head. Thank you so much.

As you know I love words, and scunnered was a gift. The sentiment it expresses is not unique, and now you've got me racking what passes for my brain for the Yiddish equivalent. Which is probably something a lot more colorful than "genug iz genug," or "oysgematert." Fahr-something, I think... but I can't remember it, and I could be wrong altogether. My command of Yiddish is uncertain at best.

Maybe someone can help.

Thanks again,
BDL
post #16 of 17
Hey BH - a person can be a scunner, too - as in 'She's a right scunner'!:peace:
post #17 of 17
thanks for tips. I may try quiche.. any good easy recipe with just cheese, bacon, and spinach? How about a basket of cranberry or blueberry scones? I love NY style bagel with cream cheese, smoke salmon and capers. Yum! But I want more warm hearty dishes that taste better with time such as a light soup or porridge?
vale
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vale
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