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Info About the Ecole Nationale Superieure de la Patisserie (ENSP)

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
A couple of months ago I started looking for an institute that offers a Pastry program. My first search criteria was the program's duration as I didn't want to spend more than 6 months in it. Then came the level of the institution, the place and of course the tuition fees.

As a start I looked at the Olivier Bajard school in Perpignan and the Ferrandi school in Paris but OB's raised their tuition fees for their 2010 program and Ferrandi's duration is 11 months.

So I changed my destination to reach the French Pastry School of Chicago which had a 6-month program and a fair tuition but their admission were not really helpful with the application and stuff which made me change my mind concerning the study in the US

I went then North to Vancouver and applied for the April 2010 program at the North West Culinary Academy of Vancouver but unfortunately it was full.

So I re-switched my thoughts and moved back to France as I found a 6-months program in Yssingeaux at the ENSP which could be taught either in English or French. Knowing that the ENSP is signed by both Alain Ducasse and Yves Thuries a friend of mine who had a program at Olivier Bajard told me that ENSP's program is really hard and not useful especially their 1 month training at the end of their program which apparently is not useful at all.

I know I seem really confusing but I'll be really glad to get opinions and thoughts about it.

About me: I'm 22 years old, living in Greece and inspired with French Pastry and willing to have my own small workshop and store
post #2 of 28
The internship after the 5 month program can last from 1 to 3 months and takes place is some really great boutiques and restaurants.  Why would this be a waste of time to put what you have learned into use??
post #3 of 28

The international FPA program is a mess. It started in April 2010 and there are many problems that need to be worked out. Mostly, the facilities are not ready. I came to this school because of their reputation, but didn't know that this was a new program. We have received more headaches and frustration than clarity and instruction. It has been a constant fight to keep requesting things which should be basic. Examples: Try cleaning chocolate with no hot water. How about making caramel with no gas for the stoves.  Wonder what you're going to learn? Keep wondering, because they don't provide a syllabus. You just walked down a dark muddy path to get to class on time at 5:30am, but you're kept waiting outside in the freezing cold because no one has the key to open the kitchen lab doors. Learn to pee in the dark because the lights often don't work. You'll be kept wondering about many things because their communication is awful. It's an expensive program (which just become more expensive by 1500 euros - sorry for you new applicants...) but they definitely need to work out some kinks and get organized for this kind of money. The level of instruction is ok. You can still learn if you can ignore all the frustrations. Maybe wait 5 years for them to get their shit together. The school does have a great network, so if you want to fork over 14500 euros just so you can tap in to it, go ahead.  

post #4 of 28

Whoopie: I have written on a forum in regards to ENSP. Lately I have researched many different schools in France and ENSP was one of the schools I decided to research. Over time of research and contacting students who have finished with the programs in the 2 month winter and summer programs and the FPA program, I find myself crossing ENSP off my list. I hope they improve over time as students are losing motivation. No school should have that effect on students. I love pasty arts, it is my passion and stirve in life. I can not imagine how I would feel in a position where I go to school full of dread.

post #5 of 28

SweetsGalore:  Can I ask why you chose to cross ENSP off your list, and what other schools you are still considering?  I am looking at pastry schools now and am interested to share notes.

post #6 of 28

Feebs:

 

May I ask where you are from? I have some schools that I have researched in the US as well as France.

 

I find ENSP crossed off my list mainly for the reason that the students from the previous programs had told me this school is unorganized and are not fully equipped. From what they said, it is exactly what whoopie had stated. Gas problems, light problems, water system problems, and equipment problems, as well as not enough equipment for the amount of students they accept. Majority of students I have contacted, seemed as though they only had one good thing to say about this school, which is; this school has great networks. Other than that, I agree with Whoopie's post, because if you are unhappy with the school because of frustration from the schools lack of organization, than how will you be able to just focus on pastry and love what you do and make the best out of your experience if you are constantly frustrated with the school. I am not willing to lose motivation for a school's disorganization. From what I heard, the international programs are very new and need improvement. The previous student I spoke to were the first FPA program students. Students I spoke to from the 2 month programs said it felt like 2 months was too short and with that little time, how can you learn as much as you can to your highest ability? If you plan on attending any patisserie school in France, be sure to study on your French, because you will need to regardless of whatever French school you attend.

 

Ecole Gregoire Ferrandi is a good school. I hear this school is better for students who have already had experience in the industry, because it is much more independent work. You can expect the chef to not always be there to direct you and steer you in the right direction to avoid mistakes, because you will make mistakes, and you will have to learn from your own mistake. But with any school, you follow a recipe and the product doesn't look like the chefs, and you wonder what you did wrong. If you didn't know, I'm sure the chef wouldn't know, but he can give you an idea of what you might have done wrong, but only you can teach yourself to avoid your mistakes. Ecole Gregoire Ferrandi is pricey, but can worth it based on how and what kind of learner you are (or if you have experience as well).

 

Valrhona, which is a chocolate distributing company, has courses for students. Of course, if your interest in chocolate, but they also have a variety of different courses that also include patisserie and different types of yummy sweets and galore! Be aware that Valrhona as workshops vs. actual courses that end with internships. However, the students I spoke to are quite happy with how the classes went, and the chefs are amazing, and the school is organized in their teaching systems.

 

For the United States, I have looked into the Art Institutes, where they have great art programs, but also provide baking and pastry courses. Depending on the location, each AI lab is different, but from the variety of students I've spoken to, AI is among the cheaper schools to attend. You pay for what you get, and it is cheaper for a reason, you can learn a lot, but the labs can be crowded, and can be limited in space.  Cincinnati, Atlanta, California, Colorado, are among the ones I researched and I can't base everything on just pictures I've seen but from what I heard, California is supposedly one of the bigger ones, and Colorado has tight and crowded labs. The program is set up very well for beginners though. The system is categorized where you will be able to learn and see what it is you would like to do as a main profession, from chocolate, to sugar, to classical French desserts, entremets, ice cream, breads, or cake decorating.

 

Le Cordon Bleu is also categorized in the same way, and they have many locations. If you ask me, I think Le Cordon Bleu in Las Vegas would be great. Majority of the students have their internships at the Bellagio Casino, MGM Grand, Aria, or even the Wynn. It really depends, but be aware that these are huge production industry in their buffet, so a lot of the things you do may be more machinery based than hands on. However, at the Bellagio, I have seen the staff make desserts at the buffet for decorating, but in the back of the kitchen I am not sure if they make everything from scratch, hand, or machinery. Jean Philippe’s Patisserie at the Bellagio and the Aria has amazing dessert. I remember hearing they do accept interns. Their desserts look amazing and you can always look to see if there are any positions open for interns.

 

 

Johnson and Wales University has equipment that is very well kept, and they are very professional. I have visited one of their schools, and they switch chefs for different categories. In my opinion, having different chefs to teach breads, classical desserts, plated desserts, and cake decorating, etc. Is a much better way to learn for the reason you are learning from chefs that are teaching in a subject they have passion for and are really good at. If you are stuck with one chef who teaches you breads to desserts, it will be very different. A baker and a pastry chef have two different levels of patience and techniques. If you have a bread chef teaching cake decorating, I’m sure you will not have efficient class training. That's why Johnson and Wales system is the best way to learn whether you are a beginner or intermediate. You can imagine, I walked into their kitchen, and it was so clean and there were bowls piled high. There was an oven rack for each table so students can mise en place all of their products and make up the products after everything is measured out to bake for that day. It's a really good system. There are students from different age and such. The only thing is some campuses provide only a 2 year degree. Be aware, you are paying over $7,000 each term.  And not all of the terms are lab work, so you will be paying 7,000 for academics. So you will have 2 terms (6 months) of lab and 1 term (3 months) of academics. 4 year programs are along the same line, but they have classes that will relate to the food industry and you will learn regardless.

 

However, I was planning to go to France, but I cannot learn French. It's very difficult for me. But the more I research and speak with students at Johnson and Wales; I have decided Johnson and Wales University in Providence. They are all motivated, they hold competitions for students, and I live in the United States, and Johnson and Wales has a great network in the US. You will be guaranteed a job, with a Johnson and Wales degree. I hear there was a partnership between Johnson and Wales and ENSP, but apparently, there are some study abroad programs at Johnson and Wales for pastry students who actually go to ENSP (previous school I mentioned). So yet again, I did research and found Johnson and Wales students who have gone to ENSP and they said the experience is great, just to be in another country. The chef is great, but they said it's not much to see. They said that you learn different things from different chefs, so if they had a French chef teach them entremets at Johnson and Wales it would be the same time. You're mainly paying to go abroad just to see what France is like, but learning in the lab is no different than learn back at home for them. Some Johnson and Wales students also said the labs are not fully equipped like Johnson and Wales labs. Hooks, paddles, and whisk are not always provided. Other students from other labs are always going into their lab using their equipments. Obviously shows ENSP has labs with more equipment than others. If you're lucky you might get the good lab. Give or take, I choose Johnson and Wales, because they are professional, they treat you and train you as professional, and that what I am looking for.

 

What research have you done? What do you recommend?

post #7 of 28

Wow thank you for the insights SweetGalore. 

 

In terms of my search, thought you should know that I only focused on programs that are intense and shorter in duration (less than a year).

 

After looking at schools in North America and France, I’ve decided to focus on France.  The schools in the US that I looked at such as FCI in NY, CIA, French Pastry School in Chicago, etc are very expensive…in most cases more expensive than the ones in France after factoring in rent so why not go to the place of origin!  I also believe a lot can be gained by living and experiencing French culture outside of class hours.

 

I have narrowed it down to Ferrandi and Ecole Internationale de Pâtisserie Olivier BAJARD for the following reasons:

 

  • Ferrandi has a strong reputation and is well-established.  The class sizes are small and I have heard that the teachers do take the time to teach you.  Majority of the course is spent in the lab and each student has the opportunity to practice after the demonstrations.  The course is also very comprehensive, breads, pastries, chocolates, ice creams.  If money was no object, I would pick this school hands down, but money is an object and because of their substantial tuition hike for the fall semester not to mention the extremely high cost of living in Paris I am still choosing between OB and Ferrandi.
  • OB strikes me because each session is taught by chefs who specialize in that field (sounds like the same reasons why you’re drawn to J&W).  The school is smaller so I believe you won’t get as lost in the crowd as you would at a larger school like Ferrandi or LCB.  The curriculum is just as comprehensive as Ferrandi.  Though the price of the program is comparable to Ferrandi, the cost of living in Perpignan is considerably less.  I have yet to find out how easy it is to get in and out of the city on weekends and I want to find out if they help place you in stages afterward which will be invaluable in this highly competitive industry.

 

About LCB since you mentioned it – have heard on numerous occasions that most of the lab time is spent observing the chef demonstrations.  I for one would prefer having more time to practice.

post #8 of 28

 

Hello Feebs,
Thank you so much for sharing your research. OB sounds very very intriguing, I might just look more into OB. I am very split on my decisions to whether I want to spend my time in a program for over or under a year. However, thank you for sharing notes. I am now going to narrow it down between Johnson and Wales or OB. The main decision will mostlikely depend on the experience in France or US. I'm thinking France though now that you mentioned that there will be different chefs for each specialty. If there are any new information you find, update me. I am always open for more options.
post #9 of 28

Feebs and SweetsGalore- Thanks for sharing!! Feebs- It sounds like we're on the same brainwave! I have a thread going on about Studying Pastry in France too right now. It's been a hard decision and your research has been extremely helpful and interesting. I've looked into studying in the US but as you said- why not go to the source. I'm leaning toward Ferrandi in Sept but want to take a look at OB and Valdrhona too now.

 

SweetsGalore - how did you get in touch with students at the school?

 

Thanks!

post #10 of 28

Hello Yellow Flamingo!

I am so glad to hear you started a thread on going to schoo for pastry arts. I was able to contact students through facebook. The schools have organized groups and I was able to send messages to fellow students who have the same passion and strive in patisserie as you and I do.

 

I was so happy to see Feebs reply. I was confused on how long I wanted to do my program, and if I were to stay in the US I would choose Johnson and Wales University, but if I am planning to leave to France I will say OB is my number one choice as of now. The more I think of France, the more I find myself wanting to go to France to study for the reason that France is the source. The thought of going to school to mainly study in patisserie, a program less than 1 year sounds really good. I am not looking into getting a degree, but a simple diploma/certificate.

 

I will update, as I make my final decision to where I will officially study at.

post #11 of 28

SweetsGalore- What a good idea and great advice to look on Facebook! Never would have thought of that. I looked into OB last night and it looks outstanding. Wonderful program and great location. I visited Nice and Cannes (sort of nearby) last year and it is just gorgeous and the people are so friendly. The length of the program is tricky and I came to the same conclusion as you. I would rather have a shorter more intense program to learn the foundation and then be able to go and gain experience in the field.

 

Right now I'm leaning toward going to Ferrandi. The program is taught in English but you are also taught the French language and culture to be able to succeed at the internship that follows. I also like that the weekends are free to experience the city or practice. The advantage of OB though is the variety of top chefs they bring in to teach the classes. Do you know if the OB program is taught in English? The training period ends up being the same between the two programs (about 5 months). Comparing the two, Ferriandi ends up being cheaper (15K as opposed to 22K) and includes placement in a 6 month internship following the program. I bet that the difference in cost would start to be made up in the difference in living expenses though. Decisions, Decisions!

post #12 of 28

SweetsGalore or Yellow Flamingo,

 

If you're able to get in contact with previous students at OB it would be great if you could share what you hear back from them?  I've only spoken to the school administration (they are fantastic at answering questions by the way), but ideally I'd like to speak with someone who actually attended the long program.  The school gave me some names of students who I emailed about a week ago but still haven't heard back (perhaps they're busy?).

 

OB has an international program so I believe you can get by without French, but it would be advantageous to learn a bit before you go there as alot of the terminology is in French, and if you take an internship through Ferrandi in France you will also need to know it.

 

In terms of prices, Ferrandi and OB are comparable.  Ferrandi just increased their prices to $18k (excluding VAT), which is comparable to OB.  At OB, you can also save money by choosing not to have lunch provided.

 

post #13 of 28

Please read Chocolat's post about Ecole Gregoire Ferrandi's pastry program in this thread.

My former pastry instructor recommended Ecole Bellouet Conseil.

He also spoke highly of the French Pastry School and Schoolcraft College. chef.gif

NSPA supposedly has a good reputation. Another poster posted about her friend who attended NSPA in this thread.

Another school to consider is PCI, Bo Friberg is the pastry instructor. Stephane Treand will be opening his school soon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Stephane Treand videos on YouTube.

 

ENSP videos on YouTube.

Buttercup: You mock my pain!
Man in Black: Life is pain, Highness! Anyone who says differently is selling something. -- The Princess Bride
Miracle Max: Sonny, true love is the greatest thing, in the world-except for a nice MLT - mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, where the mutton is nice and lean...
Reply
Buttercup: You mock my pain!
Man in Black: Life is pain, Highness! Anyone who says differently is selling something. -- The Princess Bride
Miracle Max: Sonny, true love is the greatest thing, in the world-except for a nice MLT - mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, where the mutton is nice and lean...
Reply
post #14 of 28
Hello, I am a Johnson&wales student that is currently doing my 2 month internship at ENSP. This experience is almost over and I have had the greatest 2 months of my life. I feel as though I have learned more here than ever before. My chefs are amazing and one in particular is an encyclopedia of pastry knowledge and knowledge In general. He has taught me things that I have never known but felt that I should have learned during my two years in culinary school. I absolutely adore jwu and can't wait to go back but I appreciate the experience in France that they have allowed me to receive. I understand the concerns about kinks in the program, but with all new programs come kinks. This school, town, and country are so charming and have so much to offer. I feel like I am in a fairy tale and I am very sad it has to end. The food and culture on their own are enough to make me want to stay in this glorious place. I agree with some statements about the annoyances of no hot water etc, but some things are not under the control of the school and can and do happen anywhere. When johnson& wales opened up the new building, we had times when there was no running water and faulty equipment but this would never discourage me from recommending Johnson& wales to anyone. These things just happen whether at school or in the workplace. As far as walking in mud to get to school, I do it everyday and mother nature does not care that I have to get to school. I just enjoy the exercise and never wear my cute shoes! I absoluelty loved my experience here at the ENSP and wish that my time here was longer. I would recommend this school to anyone and hopefully I will get my chance to come back here one day. I have a lot to look forward to when I get home, but I am so grateful that I have my experience at ENSP to put on my resume. I think that it will get me far and I will look back on this time in my life with fond memories of lessons learned and silly French adventures. A piece of my heart will always be here in little ol yssingeaux!
post #15 of 28

Hello Soon2beMccarthy,

 

I am so glad and happy to hear something positive from this school. Are the chefs the same for the FPA program? I feel as though , having recently been signed with JWU, ENSP has standards to live up with for the JWU students, therefore, better curriculum for JWU students. There will always be kinks in schools, but there must be something seriously going wrong within that school for other students to feel so disappointed. It may be different for you, because its a 2 month program. I do not go to Johnson and Wales and will not have the 2 month internship opportunity like you. Like others on this thread, we are looking for a program for people who are either starting or starting over. The FPA program and the 2 month summer/winter campus is what we are looking into at ENSP. I am sure the curriculum is not as great and high of standards as yours for the reason you come from Johnson and Wales.

The quality of the FPA program and 2 month summer/winter campus is what I am concerned about. Not the Johnson and Wales 2 month internship experience. It has no relevance to my research. However, I do appreciate you're post. ENSP may be great for Johnson and Wales students though,so I am happy for any JWU student who will have this opportunity.

 

- SweetsGalore!chef.gif ( I will be able to wear this toque one day...*sigh)

post #16 of 28

Hello TheUnknownCook,

Those videos are amazing! Thank you for sharing, its always great to see different opinions, better yet, some eye catching youtube videos!

 

Sweets Galore

post #17 of 28

Dear Feebs,

 

I have reached out to contact some students at OB, yet I have not received any answer. I will update you as soon as I find out anymore information.

 

Sweets Galore

post #18 of 28

Hello all,

  I did the April 2010 session and i enjoyed it> i had moments when i was upset on the school for I was in the same team with a difficult person or small organisation problems but I sure learned a lot!  The ENSP is a good school and the chef is giving all his energy and knowledge to us.. ok u don t have as many pots and pans as u wish but u can always wash the one u used...so really now...we came here to learn pastry and i did...if there r people who don t like to clean their stuff, it is their problem cuz in a real lab u do a lot of washing...and plus they have here at school a dish washer..so.... and ok if u don t have hot water to clean the floors..u can always warm some.. but u have to be willing to do so....

 

anyways, i am very happy with how the program went. We all got good internships and we all progressed.. we saw many many interesting profesional things at school and honestly the chef is a good teacher...let s not confuse things..he doesn t have to be our friend...in fact, he can only be our friend at the end of the program... but as a profesional he s good and he s always teaching us useful things.. i came here with no experience and now i can work in any pastry shop without shame!

 

I did my internship with a MOF chocolatier. i had many more responsibilities given to me than the other interns becuz our chef prepared me so so well.  U can only see this once you have finished the program- not when u r in it.

post #19 of 28

...under construction


Edited by PforPastry - 2/22/11 at 4:00pm
post #20 of 28

We finally recieved are book and it took the four month to com in. I pay too much for program here. mad.gif

post #21 of 28

I have good memories of my time at the ENSP. My chef was tough but a really good teacher. Totally implicated in his work and concerned about us as people. The staff was really helpful, if we had to go to the Dr., they were there for us. They accompanied us through the whole visa process, including taking us to the medical exam 2 hours away.

Yes, sometimes things happen in the kitchen, running out of hot water etc, but this also happened during my internship and work.  Just part of life..... 

 

Yes, taking the shortcut to school can be muddy, but you can always walk on the road...

 

I learned to speak French, learned a new trade and experienced  a new culture. I am happy. I would do it again at the ENSP. My chef prepared me very well for my new career !! 

post #22 of 28

Like what PforPastry had said,

the problems with water, gas, and walking a muddy path is probably the last of our concerns. They are obvious frustrations on top of other problems. However, the main problem is the disorganization of the FPA program. Let me remind you, last year's FPA had only 8-10 students, because the program had just started last year. This year , there are over 20 students. The quality of the program with the amount of students had a complete different effect. Overall, the program is no longer comparable to last year's students. This is now. There are problems with the disorganization of scheduling and it causes time to be wasted. The chefs do no communicate, thus wasting our time and money. There are expectations, and those expectation were the list of promises on the brochure. Its a good thing they changed it for new candidates for the next FPA because they even knew they couldn't live up to their promises on the brochures that we were given. You pay for what you are told you will be paying for, and when you pay and you're not getting what you paid for, there will always be frustration and complaints.

It's like I ordered a steak on a menu, to "accidentally" receive a salad, yet I still have to pay the price for the steak. I am only frustrated for what anyone else would simply get frustrated for. I wish this program was worth what I paid for. It's too late to complain now, but it's just sadly disappointing that you can lose so much motivation because of the programs disorganization.

post #23 of 28

i wouldnt excpext to learn french in the fpa program neither to get much of quality of teaching,ive just spent my last 6 month and 13000 euros in the fpa program you should know that there is a big difference between the facade pf this program created by theaand what u get at the end(which is chefs who might be good chefs but terrible teachers,who speaks english not worteaching standarts,who fight among among them selves for 6 month,and put you in the midlle of that,thea which after a month from yssingeaux you will not hear a word from her again,no quality control of the course what so ever,a general manger of the school which dont care about anything excepet making more money !im sad that thats how it came out to be.dont let yoursellf be sweettallked by the ensp,its a freat place for professionals but not readdy at all to take international students,maybee in 5 years it will be avery good program now its to early,we are only the 2 course taking place and there is to much dissorganization,ask any fpa student.(u can easly find us on facebook)
sincerly

FPA STUDENT

post #24 of 28

Quote: Hi to Bouabjian who started this thread back in 2009. I saw that you were living in Greece at the time of the thread. I am living in Greece for 10 years now and after being fired from my dead end job as a sales person after the birth of my second child this year I've had a lot of time to decide "what next?". I did want to become a chef when I was 17 but was never encourgaed despite my obvious talents as a cook since I was 15. Anyway after 4 years in design and fashion studies which didn't inpsire me to continue I'm 35 years old now and want to absolutley get into a culinary school to become a Chef de Patisserie. I looked into options in Paris and around France but lets face it I'm living here with a family and I can't go off for  6 - 12 months. Did you ever consider studying in Greece? Are you Greek? The institutes here are not very renowed and the only one that is supposed to be the best doesn't really measure up - you bascially go to learn the basics and get a diploma.

Thanks for any insight smile.gif

Originally Posted by Bouabjian View Post

A couple of months ago I started looking for an institute that offers a Pastry program. My first search criteria was the program's duration as I didn't want to spend more than 6 months in it. Then came the level of the institution, the place and of course the tuition fees.As a start I looked at the Olivier Bajard school in Perpignan and the Ferrandi school in Paris but OB's raised their tuition fees for their 2010 program and Ferrandi's duration is 11 months.So I changed my destination to reach the French Pastry School of Chicago which had a 6-month program and a fair tuition but their admission were not really helpful with the application and stuff which made me change my mind concerning the study in the USI went then North to Vancouver and applied for the April 2010 program at the North West Culinary Academy of Vancouver but unfortunately it was full.So I re-switched my thoughts and moved back to France as I found a 6-months program in Yssingeaux at the ENSP which could be taught either in English or French. Knowing that the ENSP is signed by both Alain Ducasse and Yves Thuries a friend of mine who had a program at Olivier Bajard told me that ENSP's program is really hard and not useful especially their 1 month training at the end of their program which apparently is not useful at all.I know I seem really confusing but I'll be really glad to get opinions and thoughts about it.About me: I'm 22 years old, living in Greece and inspired with French Pastry and willing to have my own small workshop and store


 

post #25 of 28

mporeis na mou peis gia to ensp?eimai geologos ma skeftomai edo kai kairo na stamatiso tin sxolh kai na pao ekei gia zaxaroplastiki

post #26 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chryssa Sinou View Post

mporeis na mou peis gia to ensp?eimai geologos ma skeftomai edo kai kairo na stamatiso tin sxolh kai na pao ekei gia zaxaroplastiki

 

If I may Chryssa Sinou, a translation :

 

Can you tell me about ensp?

I am a geologist but I think long ago to stop the school and go there for confectionery.

 

I hope this helps.

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply

from ...

My kitchen in the middle of the desert

A Hui Hou (until we met), ALOHA!

Reply
post #27 of 28

Can anyone tell me about a recent experience at the ENSP. Did it improve?

post #28 of 28

Hi. I was hoping someone could help me.I'm changing careers from an accountant to a pastry chef and i am finding a hard time deciding on a school and  I don't know any french, at all. I'm looking for a school with an excellent pastry and baking program, that's affordable and offers an externship program for its students.

Please advice, Thanks.

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