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progressive gourmet...

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
someone i know recently sent me info on this company... anyone here familiar with them???

Progressive Gourmet - Hors D'oeuvres

(i found it some what odd, since i own my own catering company, but they said if we ever needed 'ideas or help' to contact them)
post #2 of 10
I worked at a restaurant that bought premade aps, and there are a lot of companies springing up with this idea. The preamade aps we had were pretty sad, but that was a long, long time ago. :)
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post #3 of 10
Notice no where in their advertising was price mentioned. Even with labor, you can make it better and cheaper. All you need is a system, and freezer space.. Franks in blankets example I can make 300 per hour. food cost using good frank and premade puff past, egg wash. *8.5 cents each. They sell them for anywhere from $35.00 per 100 and up. @25.00 per hour for my labor cost . is about 8 cents each ,so you figure it. 8 plus 8.5. and they are made in off hours. I save about $17.00 per 100
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post #4 of 10
Thread Starter 
very good point ed, i dont know why someone who does this for a living would outsource the hors d'oeuvres since the profit margins are quite wide on them... certainly some may be labour intensive but if you do them on your 'off-hours' it certainly isnt anything that couldnt be done with a lil music and or help.
post #5 of 10
Ed is exactly right. I'm 15 years in catering, used the pre-made apps in the first year, almost drove me out of business. Plus, those are too similar to what people can get at Costco and Sam's Club. The public can tell a bought hor d oeuvre.

With one exception - Spanakopita. It's a pain in the butt.

Do you make Spanakopita from scratch, Ed? I've yet to meet a caterer that does.
post #6 of 10
I make mini filo cups(like the ones you can buy, and fill them with spinach feta mix from a pastry bag, less labor, plus everyone has the frozen ones, and we make Mini Baklava from scratch. Reuben puffs and anything else I can dream up from leftover meats an fish. Conch fritters, mini crabcakes, egg rolls and mexicalli rolls, won tons stuffed with devilled ham and bar b q pork you name it. It helps keep food cost down.:laser:
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post #7 of 10
That spinach/feta in phyllo cup idea is a great one, thanks.

It's all that folding with the spanakopita that sucks.
post #8 of 10

housemade hors d'oeuvres

If I'm buried, I may resort to something pre-made (can't remember when I did, though). I do agree about the spanakopitas, even though I still make them most of the time.
I look at it like this: if I pay local folks that I know and trust, it's better than supporting staff in New Jersey or Michigan or Canada or some other place thousands of miles away; they're never going to be loyal to me or give me a ride when my car's broken down, or help wash the dishes after a party, or help load a truck.
Second, and probably more important- when does one expect to develop skills, if everything comes in a dang cardboard box?
Last but not least- I got plenty of leftovers to stuff, puree, spread, bake, shake and make- why should I buy someone else's?
post #9 of 10
I feel exactly the same Mike. It helps my food-cost and in down time keeps staff occupied.
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post #10 of 10
Have to say that Progressive Gourmet can save you from having to lay off workers that would be needed for a one month basis ie December, June, October. I have personally toured the progressive plant and can say that they are not your run of the mill appetizer producers, they use quality ingredients are led by bonafide chefs and take your operation into consideration. Well I do agree that the more you make yourself the better off you are in a pinch they are great. One item of contention for me is finding out what they actually produce themselves and what they out source. Also you have to consider the level of difficulty in making the hors d'oeuvres that you purchase from them, i.e. something wrapped in puff pastry is something I would consider purchasing a spring roll too, however a skewer or a scallop in bacon or anything in a filo cup should most def. be made in house. We utilize them in a limited capacity and I generally have been satisfied with their products. Hope this helps.
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