or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Pot Racks

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for a hanging pot rack. i know nothing about them.

What should I be looking for?
post #2 of 16
Where do you want to hang it? From the ceiling, from the wall, etc.?
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
Reply
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
Reply
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
We want to hang it from the ceiling. We have a manufactured home and our ceiling is angled because it comes to a point in the center of the house.
post #4 of 16
To overcome the roof angle, try hanging the rack from chains. That will let you level it out, at whatever height is convenient for you.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #5 of 16
You beat me to it. Look for solid construction and the rest is really all about style.
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
Reply
Dammi un coltello affilato e vi mostrerò l'arte più belle del mondo.
Reply
post #6 of 16
There's no structural reason to level the rack.

Actually, if the roof's angle wasn't unattractive, I'd mount the rack at its angle in order to maximize room and facilitate organizing.

You can keep your smaller, shorter handled pots (and leave us not forget the pans) at a lower height where it's easier for the short person in the relationship to put them up and take them down.

BDL
post #7 of 16
There's no structural reason to level the rack.

That's true (unless the pitch was particularly sharp). But I think most people would find it aesthetically displeasing.

Depending on the style of the rack, one could use a combination of the two. For instance, one of those half-circle type racks could be screwed into the ceiling, while, at the same time, short chains can be run to the same "wall" to level the rack.

My homemade racks use essentially that approach, because they combine pot racks with a flat shelf whose far edge needed support. So the chains attach to the leading edges, and angle back to the wall.

Practical and aesthetically pleasing both.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #8 of 16
depends on the rack. If it's got sliding hooks, they'll move to the low side. And the effective length of the rack will be shorter, by the cosine of the angle.

Certainly, in some kitchens, an angled rack would look good. In others, it would just be weird.
post #9 of 16
I don't know what your kitchen decor is, but this is the pot rack I have:

Hammered Copper Pot Rack

Not the most flattering photo, unfortunately. This is a beautiful "antique hammered copper pot rack". It's actually copper plated steel, but unless I tell, no one knows, and I believe it's a lot stronger than the more expensive 100% copper ones. It's been in place, and used constantly for the past 4 years, and is just as beautiful today as when it was put up. Don't let the price fool you! There was no support in the place we wanted to hang it. HubbyDearest is clever though, and installed 2"X4"X 6' oak braces across the ceiling, screwing them to the beams with heavy-duty screws, so the rack could be centered in the right spot. There's probably 100+ pounds of pots, pans and assorted other equipment hanging there, with no problems at all. My ceiling is also slanted, but the chains allowed us to hang it level, and it looks great! When I finally ever do figure out how to do photos in my posts, I'll put up a picture of it!
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Chains is a very good idea. Thank you
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
I was actually looking at one like that. I think my hubby will have to hang a support beam too.

To post photos in your posts, go to Image hosting, free photo sharing & video sharing at Photobucket and open a free account. Then you will be able to select an image or upload your own and store them in your own free album.

To post an image on this board, you would copy and paste the URL that begins with [img] into your post.

If you have any problem doing this, just let me know and I will be glad to help you
post #12 of 16
First... get a stud finder. ;)

Then a pair of fairly heavy, threaded eye-bolts. Run each into a roof rafter (I assume that's what is above your ceiling) so you're got a solid attachment. Then you're set to pick a rack and get your chains.

You do NOT want to attach your rack to ceiling drywall, even if you use toggle bolts. If the drywall gives way under the load, you could have a big headache. :eek:

I found a nice rack with sliding hooks at Containers and Things; they also have packages of additional hooks. My hardware and hooks match the brushed-nickel motif of the kitchen. They have other finishes.

The rails of the rack are wood, and it comes with eight hooks. I made new rails, about twice as long as the original, finished them to match my cabinets, used all the hardware, and have 16 pots/pans (mostly cast iron) hung above the aisle in our small galley kitchen.

Works fine for my wife and me, but if you're taller than 5"-11" you have to be very alert to work in our kitchen! :rolleyes:

Unfortunately this includes both our sons, our son-in-law, and many guests. Hey, when you fit a gourmand's custom-made kitchen into an 8' x 13' space, you have to make some hard choices. :p

Good luck

Mike
travelling gourmand
Reply
travelling gourmand
Reply
post #13 of 16
Look at it this way, Mike. Keeps the riff-raff out of your kitchen. :peace:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #14 of 16
Ideally, the rafters will be located exactly where you want to put the eye-hooks to have the rack in the location you choose. How fortunate if that is so! In my case we needed to position the rack over one countertop, centered in front of the window. But the ceiling trusses weren't in the right place for this. HubbyDearest "bridged" the trusses with 2 nicely finished, sturdy oak boards, and fastened them into the beams with substantial screws. The way he put them up gives the appearance of everything being perfectly centered, but the hooks holding the chains are screwed into the oak boards. They actually bridge 3 ceiling beams. The result is that the rack is perfectly centered in the place we needed it to be, with no likelihood of it falling down (unless a gorilla were to swing from it maybe...but we don't let him out of the cellar). :look:
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
Reply
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'll make sure to remind my husband to look for the beam.

I am 5'3". I was thinking of hanging the rack ofer the kitchen's island

This was taken 5 years ago:

post #16 of 16
Missyjean, here is how I installed mine on an angled ceiling. I angled out the chains to further beams to reduce it from swaying so much. I kept it level by making the chains different sizes...

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Equipment Reviews