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Turducken Is For Sissies

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Turducken is all the rage, right now.

For those who think making one is a production number worthy of C.B. DeMille, I thought I'd post one of Hannah Glasse's recipes (would have been called a reciept back then). Ms Glasse wrote the first edition of her iconic The Art of Cookery Made Plain And Simple in 1745.

Back then, the long es was used in all instances but for the sake of clarity I've cleaned that up.

To make a Yorkshire Christmas Pie


First make a good standing crust , let the wall and bottom be very thick; bone a turkey, a goose, a fowl, a partridge, and a pigeon; season them all very well, take half an ounce of mace, half an ounce of black pepper, all beat fine together, two large spoonfuls of salt, and then mix them together; open the fowls all down the back, and bone them; first the pigeon, then the partridge; cover them; then the fowl, then the goose, and then the turkey, which must be large; season them all well first, and lay them in the crust, so as it will look only like a whole turkey; then have a hare ready cased and wiped with a clean cloth; cut it to pieces, that is, joint it; season it, and lay it as close as you can on one side; on the other side woodcocks, moor game, and what sort of wild fowl you can get; season them well, and lay them close; put at least four pounds of butter into the pie, then lay on your lid, which must be a very thick one, and let it be well baked; it must have a very hot oven, and will take at least four hours.


Ms Glasse notes, by the way, that “Thefe pies are often fent to London in a box, as prefents; therefore the walls muft be well built.”

I would think so!

Before rushing out to bake one of these be warned. The crust for one of them will take a bushel of flour. But, if anyone really wants the recipe…….
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #2 of 19
Interesting Pye recipe. But I think I'll pass for this Christemasse.

But what is Turducken? Sounds like an Austrian ski resort.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
Turducken is a three-layered dish that, if I recall correctly, Paul Prudhomme introduced several years ago. The TV chefs have all touted it the past two years or so, and everybody now wants to try their hand at it. Even some supermarkets are selling them.

It's a boned chicken, inside a boned duck, inside a boned turkey---thus TURkey, DUCk, chicKEN. They layers are separated by some sort of pate and seasonings.

But that's only three birds. Hannah Glasse's recipe has five, layered together and reshaped like a turkey, plus the assorted side meats. And it's all baked in a pieshell, unlike a turducken, which isn't.

BTW, in the 1796 edition of The Art of Cookery Made Plain and Simple, she does, at least for this recipe, spell it "pie" and "Christmas." Something I always found interesting is that "Art" in the title lacks the final "e" in all editions (depending on authority cited, there were either 5 or 8 of them in total).

Given the spellings in the recipe, and the light hand with spices, I would guess that it doesn't predate the 1700s; or if it does, not by much.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 19
This is all the rage now ? Where ? and better yet , why ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Petals, because the TV chefs keep talking about it (and sometimes making it) turducken is in demand all through the U.S. Specialty mail-order houses offer it, and some supermarkets actually stock it. The Fresh Market, for instance, has it for U$6.45/pound.

That's the where.

Why? I dunno. It's never appealed to me, personally, and I've got better things to do with my time than bone and layer several different birds. I always figured the dish existed primarily for TV chefs who wanted to show-off their knife skills.

Speaking of TV chefs, at least one would probably enjoy Hannah Glasse's pie. I'm sure as soon as Paula Deen saw put at least four pounds of butter into the pie, she'd be on board. :lol:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 19
Thanks for filling me in....have I had my head in the oven lately ? It does not appeal to me either, and I agree, to watch Chef's shine in their glory trying to make it would be worth the popcorn. All about technique......what kind of cooking is that anyway 3 for the price of one ? I have heard of cooking a ham in a turkey to save time....

Anything with that amount of butter.....you know what they say eh ?
Get the Defibrillator and shock em twice ! Mon Dieu ! :lol:

Paula can have the butter.......she would be on board.

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #7 of 19
Thanks KY
I was just being smart with the spellynges, and you';re right, "pye" would be way before the 1700s, probably (?) medieval. Do you know that cookbook done by 3 french medieval historians and cooks? very nice. Redon, Sabban and Serventi- i have it in italian but might be translated into english too.
They did a lot of that sort of thing in the middle ages, like birds with all the feathers put back on and all that, of which this turduck thing would be a variation. But I hardly see the point for today, and why, oh why, did they name it after an austrian ski resort?:lol:
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #8 of 19
I've always wanted to attempt a turducken. i think it sounds good to carve a slice straight through without worrying about bones and get three meats combined in layers.

My knife skills aren't up to it though.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #9 of 19
Thread Starter 
and why, oh why, did they name it after an austrian ski resort?:lol:

Maybe it's the Tyrolean hat used as a garnish? :smoking:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
I was just being smart with the spellynges, and you';re right, "pye" would be way before the 1700s, probably (?) medieval. Do you know that cookbook done by 3 french medieval historians and cooks? very nice. Redon, Sabban and Serventi- i have it in italian but might be translated into english too.

I'm not familiar with that book, Siduri. But that doesn't mean much. My expertise, such as it is, is with 17-19th foodways, primarily North Ameican and the cuisines that influenced them. Naturally there is some cross-over and carry-over from previous eras.

One thing about writers in those days: consistency of spelling was not one of their strong points. The same word, in the same document, might be spelled a half-dozen or more ways. Even the same recipe might have several spelling variations.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
My knife skills aren't up to it though.

It's more time consuming than anything else, Phil.

You ever spatchcocked a bird? Full deboning is just the next logical step. The real trick is to not cut through the skin when working on the legs, cuz that's what holds it all together once you cut through the ball joint.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 19
I love that about English. It's amazing that Shakespeare actually spelled his OWN name in various ways - it was obviously not considered important.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #13 of 19
Well, those hats DO have long feathers...
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
post #14 of 19
Typical stuffings are cornbread or rice or both with the organ meats used in the stuffing. Never tried it and never will :lol: I don't go for fads.
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
I dunno, Mary. Hard to call a technique that's been around several hundreds of years a fad.

The turducken, and Yorkshire Christmas pie, might be rather ornate versions of the idea. But, at base, they both consist of wrapping a protein, inside a protein, etc.

Seems to me, a Scotch egg and Hannah's Christmas pie are merely differences of degree, not differences of kind.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #16 of 19
A dish I would eat and which became a grand slam winner is :

CAPE CHEF :

"Turdunkin" (not really) of pork tenderloin and chicken breast layered with duxelle, seared and roasted, red pepper/red wine demi glacé, tourneed and glazed rutabaga and carrot, celery root soufflé.

My hat goes off to you for such a great success !......I have to say the technique in itself is adventurous....in the words of my....A La Cuisine !

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #17 of 19
I don't like duck either :lol:
post #18 of 19
Mary,

Have you seen the movie "Rob Roy" with Liam Neeson ? Now picture him saying to you in his wonderful charming Scottish accent, " Aye , Marrrry , you don't like duck love, what if I made it fer ya ?"

Then I would be behind you whispering ," Say you like it, say it..!!!" :roll:

ps. how I went from Turdurken to Liam, who knows ?

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply

Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
(168 photos)
Wine and Cheese
(62 photos)
 
Reply
post #19 of 19
:lol: I ate way to much duck as a kid. My brothers and dad both hunted to keep everyone fed. Duck bleh :lol:
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