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Tiger Sauce?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
As I too have been going through my PC recipe archive, in my jambalaya recipes I've seen a few mentions of Tiger Sauce, and used fairly heavily in those recipes.

I found it in my grocer yesterday and was wondering opinions of any who have tried it.

Ingredient list looks to be a cross between hot sauce, worcestershire and tamarind.

Opinions?

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #2 of 25
I use it at home all the time like I do catsup. have never used it in cooking so to speak, but I like the flavor on pork chops. To bad it only comes in small bottles.
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post #3 of 25
Thread Starter 
Amazon shows a 10 oz bottle. I can see it being a pleasant condiment.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 25
Phil,

It is good in a vegetable Stir Fry

or add fresh ginger to it and marinate chicken or pork, or mixed into Thai noodles.

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Petals
Réalisé avec un soupçon d'amour.

Served Up
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Wine and Cheese
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post #5 of 25
Thread Starter 
Good to know.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 25
It is a staple in my pantry. We use it on pulled pork bbq, and marinate shrimp with it before grilling.
post #7 of 25
it's got a sweetness to it.....we used to find it at restaurants when vacationing in Florida.
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post #8 of 25
Is it more like a sweet soy or more like HP Sauce (english bottled condiment, if anyone's familiar with it).

Haven't seen it here
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #9 of 25
It is not like HP sauce. It has a vinegar component, some sweetness, and some heat. I use it in place of the vinegar based bbq sauces you commonly see with pulled pork bbq recipes.
post #10 of 25
It's one of the favorite condiments with my crews. I keep a bottle with my spices, find, like Old Bay and a good fish sauce, sometimes when there is something missing, it does the job.
Nan
post #11 of 25
I didn't know you could buy that sauce pre-made! My favorite Thai restaurant has a dish they call "Crying Tiger", which is a sliced rib-eye steak with the Tiger dipping sauce and a cucumber/carrot salad. I think once I tried to replicate the sauce using rice vinegar, soy sauce and various chili flakes. I LOOOOOVE that sauce. Goes wonderfully with steak.
post #12 of 25
ok...you guys got me. I bought some today :)


thanks for posting!
dan
post #13 of 25
OK. Now what about Pickapeppa?

BDL
post #14 of 25
Oh don't you even say that! I would have picked that one up too, but I didn't want too many new things at once. I'd rather concentrate on the flavors of one for now.

Pickapeppa, you had ta say it didn't ya :mad:
post #15 of 25
Thread Starter 
Pounded out some pork chops and seasoned them adobo and tiger sauce. Then grilled on cast iron grills. Came out pretty tasty. Something to keep around I think.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #16 of 25
I used mine today too. I used it on top of store bought spring rolls, it was good :)

Hmmm...


dan
post #17 of 25
Ah, quite possibly my favorite bottled sauce! Somewhere there's a site by a guy who tries to replicate it online, too tedious, but might interest some. Just google it.

You can also buy it by the gallon from the company, interesting that they now seem to sell it in larger bottles too! It goes great on anything that can use a bit of sweet/sour/spice, which is just about anything :-)

I'm not sure it's the same thing as that Thai tiger sauce from the restaurant mentioned above, would be interesting if the poster could compare.
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"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!" - Thomas Keller

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post #18 of 25
I'm wondering too - I would have to purchase a bottle if I can find it somewhere. The sauce from that Thai restaurant is really liquid, like soy sauce - is that bottled sauce kinda thick?
post #19 of 25
Thread Starter 
No, not really. A touch more viscous than soy though.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #20 of 25
thicker than tabasco, but not as thick as a bbq sauce or ketchup. Somewhat translucent too. A bit like sweet hot sauce from the Asian market.

I think this is the site where I read mock recipes years ago:
Tiger Sauce Clone Page

And you can order by the gallon, at least you could in the past. tigersauce.com does not show up today though.

Of course it also has a face book page, ROFL.
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"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!" - Thomas Keller

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post #21 of 25
There are some incredibly good Thair restaurants in LA, especially (and not surprisingly) around "Thai Town" in "East Hollywood" (in quotes because it's more a real estate agent's term than an actual neighborhood). So, what's your favorite Thai place?

You absolutely must get to The Palms aka Thai Palm (on Hollywood Blvd) if for no other reason than to see "Kevin, the Thai Elvis" do his act. And Siam Sunset (Sunset Blvd) for yentafo. Amazing yentafo. Oh, and Sunshine (Western Blvd) for it's incredibly international clientele -- Thai, African, Mexican, you name it. All of these are "joints" more than "restaurants." Great food, rock-bottom prices, no ambience.

Sometimes I get too enthusiastic... What's your favorite? Or at least where do the "Tiger sauce," you're raving about?

Yes. About like A-1, HP, Pickapeppa, etc.

Also, there's nothing Thai in any way about the bottled product. It's pretty much Worcestershire, made sweet, sour and hot with vinegar, sugar, and red peppers; the whole thing held together with guar gum or something like that. It has no history or ethnic connotations that I know of, and FWIW, I think the geographical origin was Lousisiana.

BDL
post #22 of 25
I think that is a very good description. This thread is causing me to put a pork butt on the pit tomorrow. I got some extra good oysters yesterday, and have fried up a couple of batches, which brings me to another great sauce. Cholula! It has been one of our favorite hot sauces for years, and is great on fried oysters or chicken wings.
post #23 of 25
I'm not sure you convinced me... is the food good too? :lol:

Thanks for the tips, I'll keep them in mind!

Well then given your (seeming) preference for authentic style Thai food in joints you might laugh at my westernized choice, but hey, I don't care, it's the first restaurant I really liked 10 years ago when I landed in L.A. and to this day it's still one of my favorite restaurants in L.A. It's called Pink Pepper, on Highland just south of Hollywood. But man, that Tiger sauce they have is something else. They also make an incredible duck (the best duck I've personally experienced in town, and I've ordered duck in chinese restaurants quite a LOT), a great hot and sour fish, real good chicken larb, a great pineapple fried rice, etc etc... anyway here's a picture of the rib eye steak with the tiger sauce on the right - the dish is called "Crying Tiger":



OK sounds like it's a totally different tiger sauce then!
post #24 of 25

It is a great sauce on seafood, beef, pork. I also put it over a block of cream cheese and serve with crackers for an hor'dorve. You can also do it with the pick-a-pepper sauce.

post #25 of 25

When I was in college at Tennessee, Tryme was a local company and was VERY popular on restaurant tables--especially at Wing establishments.  Usually, most places that carried it had the Tiger sauce on the table along with the companies 2 other sauces--Tennessee Sunshine and their Worcestershire sauce.  When the tiger sauce bottle was empty (which was frequent) we made our own by mixing equal parts of the other 2, Tennessee Sunshine and Worcestershire plus a little sugar.  I have always felt that this is the recipe.  Perhaps I am mistaken, but when I read that people were looking for the recipe, my first thought was, "I think they are overthinking it a bit?  Try mixing hot sauce (Tennessee Sunshine if you want the pepper flakes and seeds--but Louisiana works) plus Worchestershire--plus a little sugar and see if a light does not pop on?  Another sauce, Wentzel's oyster sauce, served by popular gulf coast oyster house Wentzels--is also this same recipe minus the sugar.

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