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campfire pizza

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
last summer we tried to make a pizza over the fire. this didn't work. has anyone had success with this? If so, how?
post #2 of 28
I've not done it myself, but have seen it done two ways.

1. Form your dough and "bake" it directly on the grill. You have to do this over coals, not open flame. Flip it when one side is done, add toppings, and cook until finished. On the grill you would lower the cover after flipping, so maybe a foil tent would be good on an open fire.

2. Get a very large terra cotta flowerpot tray, and use it as a baking stone. Put it over the fire, "bake" the crust in it until done on one side, flip, and continue as above.

What was your procedure that didn't work?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 28
Use a large dutch oven upside down. I've done it. Not strictly campfire at that point but still good.
post #4 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post

Use a large dutch oven upside down. I've done it. Not strictly campfire at that point but still good.

If you don't want to shovel coals out of the campfire, light charcoal briquettes and place them on the bottom of the upside down Dutch oven as suggested by phatch. Cover the oven with a heavy layer and place one or two rings of coals under the lid. As with any pizza, you want a hot oven, around 540 degrees.
post #5 of 28

Dutch oven over shoveled coals is the best way to make pizza. If you dont want to carry the cast iron, grill the flatbread and finish it slow over coals in what ever pan you have covered in foil.

post #6 of 28

A large dutch oven wouldn't be very practical, depends if you want to camp in the back yard on not I guess.

 

I've had a few miserable failures with pizza's made on BBQ's

 

I would definitely make the base or dough up beforehand though.

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post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by callstar View Post

A large dutch oven wouldn't be very practical, depends if you want to camp in the back yard on not I guess.

Why not? For most cases, 16" is the biggest most people can find  and that's not too unwieldy and is a good sized pizza.
 

post #8 of 28

Use bannock as your base.

premix all dry ingredients before you set out on your trip, cut in your lard and pack in an airtight container and stick in yoru backpack.

When the time comes to bake it, mix with water and knead lightly.

Preheat a cast iron pan, grease the bottom, place flattened bannock in bottom. Cook over a low/medium heat. When the bottom is golden, flip, top with your toppings, place back on heat.

post #9 of 28

Bon journo , I thought i've seen every way to make pizza but this one i do not know if it is the best idea i mean i dont see how the heat could move around enough or it could even get hot enough but i do not know. Ciao

post #10 of 28

You doubt the heat? You've never cooked on a well made bed of coals then, I take it?

 

How do you figure folks cooked before gas and electricity? Pizza's a new invention is it?

 

post #11 of 28

Just saw an old Bobby Flay grillin show, and the guest made bannock by just throwing the shaped dough onto the grill.

 

There's no reason I can think of that pizza wouldn't work the same.

 

In Molto Gusto, Mario Batali's pizza are all based on a dough that gets pre-cooked on a griddle. There, again, I see no reason it wouldn't work just as well directly on a grill.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by milwaukeecookin View Post

last summer we tried to make a pizza over the fire. this didn't work. has anyone had success with this? If so, how?


I have not heard anyone had a success in making a pizza over the fire. The main process of cooking a pizza should be at I think 250 F

and the heating element should be both on top and bottom. :)

post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by HomeMadeCook View Post


I have not heard anyone had a success in making a pizza over the fire. The main process of cooking a pizza should be at I think 250 F

and the heating element should be both on top and bottom. :)

Hm, I think the temperature should be a trifle higher than 250°F, probably closer to 450°-550°F?

 

If I am not mistaken, commercial pizza ovens go much higher...
 

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Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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Chef,
Specialties: MasterCook/RecipeFox; Culinary logistics; Personal Chef; Small restaurant owner; Caterer
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post #14 of 28

Yep....I've seen twice through the pizza oven for a W/D steak! 

"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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"Life is what happens to us while we are making other plans."
Allen Saunders, 1957.
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post #15 of 28

Typical pizza ovens, as such, operate at about 750F. More and more they're being built to operate much higher than that; as much as 1,200 with some of them (including wood-fired ovens).

 

But that has little to do with either the home oven or campfire.

 

and the heating element should be both on top and bottom.

 

Not necessarily, HomeMade. There are numerous ways of adjusting for a single-direction heat source. And there are many ways of creating a double-direction on an open fire. See, for instance, Phatch's and Prairie Chef's posts for some of the possibilities.

They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #16 of 28

I understand your point. This is just my point to what is the main post is. Now, 250 F is I think the best is you'll be making a pizza if

your garnish are already cook. This degree can make the cheese melt and brown already. Like the restaurant that I know (international pizza restaurant), they make their oven only for 250 F.  :) 

post #17 of 28

Opppps! Sorry guyz?! Make my mistake on my last post. Did't see that it was on 250 C not 250 F so, it it will be on F it will be at

450 F. Sorry for the info. :(

post #18 of 28

Here is a link from a spearfishing forum I frequent that describes pizza on the BBQ....

 

http://spearboard.com/showthread.php?p=1217643#post1217643

post #19 of 28

Grilled pizza is something I do all the time, It is my sons favorite food. He is only 6 but he is a self proclaimed foody. I like to use fresh tomatoes, and basil and minced garlic. Occasionally I will add some Feta cheese if we're in the mood, and have it on hand. Cook the tomatoes first in a fish or vegetable basket. Stretch the dough in olive oil then throw it directly on the oiled grill grate. brush with olive oil, flip the dough, I find a cookie sheet works best for that. Here's the trick, put the cheese on first (that way it melts before the crust burns), then the other toppings. I find the jarred minced garlic actually works better than fresh because the fresh is a bit stronger and doesn't get really cooked. If you have a grill with a lid (not really practical on a camp fire) you can set it up with coals on one side and then move the dough over to the cool side after the second side cooks and close the lid to melt the cheese. If that is the case then it doesn't matter what order you do the toppings, the cheese will melt.

   Credit where it is due- Check out Stephen Raichlens "The Barbecue Bible" ,he has a few recipes in there. I don't really like the dough recipe in that book, but that is were i first encountered grilled pizza as a concept.

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post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phylasso View Post

Bon journo , I thought i've seen every way to make pizza but this one i do not know if it is the best idea i mean i dont see how the heat could move around enough or it could even get hot enough but i do not know. Ciao

I was thinking the same thing. I'd give it a try though.
 

post #21 of 28

As stated before, the key here is not using open flame but coals. You're trying to heat the crust, not light it on fire.

post #22 of 28

So glad I saw this thread.  I had asked in an earlier post if anyone had any tips about grilling pizza on a BBQ grill.  Think I might have better luck with charcoal but I'll keep experimenting with gas.

post #23 of 28

I imported this from the US and believe it is the only one Down Under.

It is not a Weber accessory and  can only be bought on Amazon. I use it on my Weber Performer.

A Kettle Pizza Oven - works well:

http://www.amazon.com/KettlePizza-Basic-22-5-Kettle-Grills/dp/B00528BBQ2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1318498345&sr=8-1

post #24 of 28

I did this when I was backpacking in Cali. above Camarillo in the hills. We just used a barbaque rack and held it at a decent distance, it cooked great for us, although we did burn the crust a little on the edges.

post #25 of 28


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by KYHeirloomer View Post
.2. Get a very large terra cotta flowerpot tray, and use it as a baking stone. Put it over the fire, "bake" the crust in it until done on one side, flip, and continue as above. What was your procedure that didn't work?


When I first read this I thought of a very large terra cotta pot. I was thinking "almost a tandoor", and then I realized that's not what you were talking about smile.gif Plus, I'd like a picture of anyone taking a really big flowerpot in/on a backpack. rollsmile.gif

 

post #26 of 28

its got to be 800 to 900 deg

post #27 of 28

You can make a good campfire/camp stove pizza with a frying pan and a cast iron lid. That's what I use anyway and it always turns out nice. Basically just stick the cast iron lid on the fire or over a stove till it's really hot, heat the frying pan up then put the pizza in it with the lid on. Cooks nicely in about 5-10 mins.

 

 

post #28 of 28

We make tortilla pizzas all the time.  Tortilla, sauce, cheese, toppings, another tortilla.  wrap in foil and place on grill and cook til golden brown.

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