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So successful..they no longer need my services? Riiiiiiight!!!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
First off, I want to thank all of you for supporting my issue I had posted awhile back about my labor & food cost deal. I kept my head down and kept doing my job and doing it well! As of January 19th, I was giving notice that my last day will be January 23rd. Due to the fact of "the restaurant is so successful, we cannot justify paying a Chef's salary any further". And that they need to move forward and start making more profits. They needed my experience in developing the menus, layout and getting it where it is today...sucsessful! Now, they no longer need me and feel the staff is well enough to carry through. :laser: They did let me finish out my work week, and gave me three weeks severance witch I had them sign. What a crock of S**T!!! The place is packed nightly and we are in peak season. Nobody there even has an ounce of expertize in operating the kitchen at all! And, nobody there is Health Certified now. Oh well...on to better things now. Just tough in todays economy to find another Exec. Chef position :look: Hope all is well for all of you.
post #2 of 12
You and I know that they are going to slowly deteriorate, maybe not so slowly.
Eventually they will hire someone to fill your vacated position, my guess is some young person who will work for the opportunity rather than the money, because the money won't be there.
Meanwhile, they will pat themselves on the back on how much money they're saving without you there, telling themselves that all of the problems that occur and get worse as time goes by are a good trade off for the savings.

Congratulations on doing such a good job, you'll find something better, hopefully sooner rather than later.
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.
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post #3 of 12
What Jim said.........

O.T.O.H. you now have "bragging rights" on your resume for setting up a sucesful kitchen. Use this to your advantge. And when negoatiating for a new job ALWAYS assume that once set up and running smoothly, you'll get kicked out--again, use this to your advantage and negoatiate a contract for X mths, then a new contract after this period.

It's a cruel world out there. The only employer you'll ever really trust is yourself........
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 12
It happens, 2gottza. Far more often than we're willing to admit. And, as Jim notes, if history is any clue the place isn't long for this world. Which doesn't help you much.

But it's best to learn from your experience. One lesson is that the first thing you negotiatite, on an employment contract, is the termination package. Sounds strange, I know. But no different than a pre-nup; not in today's world.

Now then, you've had a few days to be pissed. Get over it. Time to go to work. Looking for a job at any time is a full time job. Get your resume and other supporting documents together.

And for goodness sake, do not use a standard resume form. Ain't nothing in the world more boring. Instead, format your resume so that it stresses your strengths and accomplishments, downplays negatives, and ignores anything that could appeal to bias.

Start networking. Apply everywhere---don't wait for jobs to be advertised. Decide where you'd like to work, and apply there. Follow every lead.

Hey! Why are you wasting time reading this? Your energies should all be devoted to finding a new position.

Go get 'em, tiger.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 12
Good Job . This happened to me many times when I was younger . I then got smart and insisted on an employment contract for a specific date and amount, with set goals and duties . We both knew it was not going to last forever, and this way we both parted friends, and were both happy with the outcome. I always insisted to be paid as an independent contractor consultant. It worked out great.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #6 of 12
Lots of great advice here. I'm sorry to hear about your situation but there is some silver lining although I doubt it seems that way now. In the future you will learn to see this coming and be prepared in advance. Hands on learning can be brutal.
That was very fast and sound thinking to get your severance offer in writing. The only other suggestion I have is to finish the week and be professional. Never burn your bridges. You just never know who you will run into years down the road and a friendly face is always welcome. Try to get a letter of recommendation as places come and go. The only thing worse than losing your job is losing your job and the reference. ;)
I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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I think the most wonderful thing in the world is another chef. I'm always excited about learning new things about food.
Paul Prudhomme
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post #7 of 12
Yep, give 'em enough rope and they'll hang themselves. This is the time to drag out the B.S. big time. Tell them how you understand and that you are glad you had the opportunity to work with them, blah, blah, blah (try not to gag until you get that letter of recommendation). Use that letter to pump up your resume as stated earlier, and once you have that letter, get one of your friends to call the health dept. and tell them they're operating withour a certified person. You owe yourself that much satisfaction. They won't shut them down, but somebody will have to go through the hassle of signing up, paying for and suffering through that boring class. They won't last long anyway. If they knew so much, they wouldn't have needed you in the first place. Trouble is, anybody that dumb won't know what happened when they do go under. They'll come up with 40 million excuses, none of which will be that they were clueless and when things were going good they were too dumb to realize it and therefore made a fatal mistake. I have a feeling that it might be more than the owners just being clueless. There may be something seriously wrong here where the money's going out faster than it's coming in. At any rate, best of luck. The Irish always say " God never closes a door without opening a window." May this be the window to a better opportunity for you.
post #8 of 12
:rolleyes: I had the same problem when I was up north. It was a Union town and you had to belong to the Union and were not suposed to discuss your own contract. I would build up their business and they would take a vacation to The Bahamas or Europe.
When they returned I would resign and tell them I didn't need them there when the house was empty, I needed them there when the house was full and go on to somewhere else. It was a constant circle. That's why I moved to Florida and started Catering. It use to be the Chef got a percentage of gross sales and a percentage of net profits but they don't do that in a Union town.:thumb:
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your support! I did get the letter signed for my severance and my letter of recommendation. One of my cooks already left and a few more are leaving shortly. The kid that is "running" the show now didn't even know what tomato sauce was! LMAO!!! This is who they have??? This will be their first weekend without me and the first weekend for the kid also...I expect my phone will be ringing off the wall after tonight, I will not answer. The place gets packed every weekend to the point of standing room only. I will wait till all my severance is paid to me, then yes...maybe a friend will call the Health Dept. As GREYEAGLEM stated "they are already making excuses and yes, allot of people feel the money is going elsewhere. NOT SAYING WHERE!!! My "old" crew now is not divulging any information to the "kid" nor do they have the answers for him. Most of the information is in my head. They will figure it out soon themselves. Just hate the way this evolved. But, You all say it's happened to most of you too. This is the first time in 24 years it has happened to me. And yes, I did have a contract before we even opened...he never signed it. Kept saying he hasn't had the time and just went on biz as usual. FOODPUMP...I do have bragging rights as you stated! LOL And JUSTJIM...They are already crumbling, but will get it together soon, not soon enough. :thumb:
post #10 of 12
Thread Starter 
ED, The sad thing about this whole deal is that the owners are not even in the restaurant industry! One is a chiropractor, and the other was a V.P. of a automotive brake shop! So, that can tell you what I was up against. Check this...I told them I need my crew here and start training them in at least a week and a half minimum prior to opening...they gave me 3 days from off 5 trucks to dining room floor to open this place!!! The staff hadn't even seen the menu nor didn't even know what they were prepping for till two days before opening! We pulled it off! Though I lost a ton of weight and gained allot of stess...LOL! The owners didn't even know what clarified butter, asiago, havarti, farfalle, C.A.B. or anything like that was!
post #11 of 12
*restaurant available sign will go up soon.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #12 of 12
Heh. :D

FOR RENT! We should have a poll and see when these guys will go under.
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