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molecular gastronomy

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
so I have been intrigued by the use of many chemical additives used today in the kithcen. I have been looking to purchase some online and have found many sites, prices, etc... was wondering if anyone could recommend a site that they prefer? it is my first time using these techniques any advice...
post #2 of 8
start off simple .... thats what a chef told me when i came to him whith the same deal... i didn't listen and well....

and remember solubility !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
post #3 of 8
Start off either with a particular technique in mind; eg. Spherification OR by a certain ingredient and practice with different applications; eg. Gellan gum or Xanthan.

As for sites; welcome to world wide web;

http://infusions.direct2.me/page/recipe_ideas.html
Molecular Cuisine - Forum
http://www.cybercolloids.net/recipes/
post #4 of 8
This is great advice. I just started messing around with chemicals and whatnot about a year ago, and repetition of one particular technique is really the best way to do it.

You might try getting some soy lecithin granules. Just add them to a liquid and hit it with an immersion blender. Grab the bubbles (or "air") that form and use them as a garnish. It's a very simple technique and can be used with many bases.
post #5 of 8
post #6 of 8
I'd personally recommend reading any book by Herve This and Pierre Gagnaire to get a better understanding of what molecular gastronomy is about... Many of the techniques don't require any chemicals or special ingredients at all, or with the proper understanding you can extract certain compounds from various foods (gelatins from animal products, pectins and gels from vegetables, etc...).
post #7 of 8
Check out the websites below, these guys are the Kings.


.: elBulli :.


The Fat Duck
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
Reply
UNDER PRESSURE AT PEMBROKE
Cooking sous vide at Cambridge's third oldest College
http://thepembrokekitchen.blogspot.com/
Reply
post #8 of 8
Amen!

Blumenthal is much more talkative than Andria- aside from his numerous books, he's been writing for 'The Times' for years (all of the articles are now published online): Heston Blumenthal recipes and cooking tips | Food and Drink - Times Online

Getting inside Ferran Andria's head is considerably more difficult unless you can spare the several hundred dollars for his books!
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