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How do you make this cheesecake?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Do you bake the crust first, then pour in half of the uncooked cheesecake, put down your partially baked cake, then lastly, pour the rest of the uncooked cheesecake over the top, and then finish baking?

The Cheesecake Factory: Stefanie?s Ultimate Red Velvet Cake Cheesecake
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post #2 of 16
Your description, by itself, is too terse to follow easily. Unfortunately, the link seems to be broken -- or at least is coming up empty. You may want to fix that.

From what you said, it appears you're trying to transfer a partially baked red-velvet cake to a partially filled spring form pan in order to serve as a middle layer between layers of unbaked cheesecake batter -- then baking the whole shebang.

I have my doubts about the procedure. Maybe it's just the gloomy disposish of a native pessimist, but I don't see you getting that red-velvet layer out of its own pan without multiple disasters.

The usual method for this sort of madness is to bake the cheesecake layers in separate pans. Cool and freeze them. Bake the red velvet cake layer(s) separately. Allow the red velvet cake to cool, then remove from the pan. Assemble the whole thing with the cheesecake still frozen. Allow to stand until the cheesecake thaws. You may garnish, frost, top or whatever, either before or after the thaw. Exercise your sound discretion in terms of what seems best, all things considered.

If I were making it, I wouldn't use a normal cheesecake crust, but would use a layer of red velvet cake on the bottom instead. My version would go: red velvet - cheese - red velvet - cheese -- frosted top and sides with chantilly cream.

I've done this, but only using a chocolate genoise, never red velvet cake.

BDL

PS. You're posting in one of the "professionals only" sections. There's also a general baking thread. Even if you are or were a pro, I suggest asking a moderator to move your post to get more responses.
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post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks, for the help

I haven't tasted one, but did see it at the Factory. Looks like a cheesecake with a floating red velvet cake layer in the center.
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post #4 of 16
I know just the one you mean. The Cheesecake Factory (Stephanie's Red Velvet Cheesecake) version is four layers: starting with RV on the bottom, then CC, RV, and CC. They use a white frosting with a crumb garnish on the side. I'm not sure what the frosting is exactly. There is no crust.

You can see pictures on the net that will show you how it's constructed. Other than the frosting -- make it as I described.

That is, make a cheesecake batter, divide it in half and bake each half in a separate pan (spring forms probably aren't necessary here, but they'd be nice). Rest until cool. Freeze the cheesecakes in their pans.

Then make a red velvet cake of the same diameter as the cheesecakes, and either bake it in two layers or split it after baking and cooling. Easier to bake as separate layers (if you have enough pans!), IMO.

Assemble with the cheesecakes still frozen. If you like, you may add a thin smear of frosting on top of each red velvet cake layer to keep things from sliding around. Depending on your type of frosting, you may prefer to wait until the cheesecakes have defrosted, before applying it, as some frostings can become gummy on contact with something that cold, while others may weep when they defrost.

BDL
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post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
That was perfect, thanks.
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post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
I have a thought. Would, baking one cheesecake, freezing it, then take it out and splitting it in two, affect the taste?
What I am trying to say is it better to make two or make one and split it?
Everyone loves my cheesecakes because they are not dense and taste real smooth, so I would like to retain that same texture.
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post #7 of 16
Make two. It's almost impossible to split a cheesecake. You can retain the texture by controlling the cheesecake baking time; that is, cutting it roughly in half.

You're trying to perform an unnatural acty by layering cheesecake with regular cake. You're going to have to make some compromises to pull it off at all.

BDL
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post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
I agree, it didn't sound like it would work too well, but I had to ask. Someone tried it though
Thanks
Red Velvet Cheesecake
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post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
BDL,  I had a question about pans but I reread your messages and got my answer.
Edited by oli - 2/27/10 at 6:54pm
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post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks, will be making it this weekend
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post #11 of 16
Oli,

Sorry, looked like I missed a message.  Please let us know how everything worked when you've finished.

Luck,
BDL
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post #12 of 16
I made this during the weekend..  still in the freezer til I have time to assemble. Please let us know how yours worked out.

Don't forget to feed the pig...

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post #13 of 16
Control your cheesecake texture by using a thermometer. The next time you bake one of your cheesecakes that you like the texture of, take the temp in the center when you pull it. Go with that temp and you'll get that texture no matter how thick or thin you make it. Time will only be an accurate guide after you've had a successful run and kept track of how long it took... and you'll have to figure that out for every thickness you decide to do and maybe even every oven you do it in.
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post #14 of 16
Thread Starter 
And the crowd went wild.  Rave reviews by everyone, including a few who were not sure and needed another slice. 
Thanks again for the help
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post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
I like your suggestion.  Never thought of doing that, but I have not made a bad cheesecake yet, seems to come out just right each time.  I wonder if there is some latitude with cheescakes, that a little over or under and your still fine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tri2Cook View Post

Control your cheesecake texture by using a thermometer. The next time you bake one of your cheesecakes that you like the texture of, take the temp in the center when you pull it. Go with that temp and you'll get that texture no matter how thick or thin you make it. Time will only be an accurate guide after you've had a successful run and kept track of how long it took... and you'll have to figure that out for every thickness you decide to do and maybe even every oven you do it in.
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post #16 of 16
So very glad if anything I wrote was helpful.

BDL
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