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Valentine Chocolate Mousse

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi, all

Valentine is coming, I understand your needs.
Here is a great recipe for the date. This Valentine Chocolate Mousse is super sweet, fancy with Perfect texture. The Aztecs considered this Chocolate Mousse as a power as V.
The recipe video is at Valentine Chocolate Mousse - BeTheCook - Food & Cooking Recipes


Ingredients

  • 3.5 oz dark chocolate bar
  • 1 tablespoons butter
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1 tablespoon white granulated sugar
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 1/8 tsp ground chipotle
  • very tiny pinch of salt
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp heavy whipping cream
  • extra cream and chocolate shavings to garnish - optional
Instructions


Step 1

Take 3.5 oz dark chocolate bar, chop or break in small pieces (you can get away with).
Put the chocolate pieces, 1 tablespoons butter
and 2 tbsp water for chocolate into a bowl.
Step 2

Pour water into a pan over a low heat, Put the chocolate bowl above the pan.
This is to let the chocolate melt. When the chocolate melts, Stir them well.
Step 3

Put 2 large egg yolks, 2 tbsp water, and 1 tablespoon white granulated sugar
into a bowl. Put the bowl on the pan with water. Stir well.
Step 4

Then dump the egg mixture into the chocolate bowl, Mix well.
Add in 1/8 tsp ground chipotle, Mix well.
Set aside Let them come to room temperature.
Step 5

Put 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp heavy whipping cream into a bowl.
Stir well.
Step 6

When the chocolate has cooled, add in very tiny pinch of salt and half heavy whipping cream.
Use the folding method to mix them.
And dump in the remaining heavy whipping cream. Mix well.
Step 7

Now spoon chocolate and cream mixture to cups. Wrap them and refrigerate overnight.

Step 8

To serve, Add extra cream and chocolate shavings to garnish.

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post #2 of 7
Ya know, Chefguy, if you were a little less anxious to promote your site, and a little more anxious to truly share, maybe you'd have gotten this right.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 7
That's hilarious.

Braised beef as a valentine mousse.:talk::talk::talk::talk::talk:
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
I was a little hurried the day, now the recipe is completed.
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Glad you like it. It is really a great, sweet and delicious Chocolate Mousse for Valentine Date. Hope you enjoy, and the recipe match your name sweetly...
post #6 of 7

What is the difference?

What is the difference between chipotle and chili powder? I have chili powder and was wondering if it would change the flavor of the mousse. Looking forward to trying this recipe, I have been craving a good mousse.

Drummin' Up Dishes
The Late Baker
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Late Baker View Post

What is the difference between chipotle and chili powder? I have chili powder and was wondering if it would change the flavor of the mousse. Looking forward to trying this recipe, I have been craving a good mousse.

Drummin' Up Dishes
The Late Baker

A chipotle (pronounced /tʃɨˈpoʊtleɪ/ chi-POHT-lay; Spanish: [tʃiˈpotle]), or chilpotle, is a smoke-dried jalapeño chili used primarily in Mexican and Mexican-inspired cuisine, such as Mexican-American and Tex-Mex.

There are many varieties of jalapeños which vary in size and heat. In Mexico, the jalapeño is also known as the cuaresmeño and gordo. Until recently, chipotles were almost exclusively found in the markets of central and southern Mexico. As Mexican food became more popular abroad, especially in North and South America in the late 20th century and into the 21st century, jalapeño production and processing began to expand into Northern Mexico to serve the Southern United States, and eventually processing occurred in the United States and other places, such as China.
 

There are two different piquant ("hot") spices commonly called Chili powder, chile powder or chilli powder (British English).[citation needed]

One is a powder consisting purely or mainly of powdered hot chili peppers, usually (but by no means always) of the species Capsicum annuum, and the other is a powdered spice mix intended as the principal flavor ingredient in chili con carne.

The former, which is sometimes also called cayenne pepper can be made from virtually any hot pepper including the eponymous cayenne, ancho, jalapeño, New Mexico, and pasilla chilis. Its piquance ("heat"/"spicyness") varies widely depending on which are used (and their proportions if several types are mixed).

This type of chili powder is widely used in traditional Indian cuisine. In Indian_English chilli powder always means this one, not the spice mix.

The chili powder spice mix contains hot chilis and often mild paprika chilis as well, and other ingredients which usually include cumin, oregano, garlic powder, and salt. [1][2] It may also include any or all of the following additional spices: black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, mace, nutmeg, and turmeric.[citation needed] Again the piquance and flavor will vary widely depending on the exact ingredients used and their proportions.

The spice mix is especially popular in American cuisine as the primary flavor ingredient in chili con carne. The first commercial blends of chili powder in the U.S. were created in the 1890s by D.C. Pendery and William Gebhardt for precisely this dish.[3]

 

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